Helpful Posts Helpful Posts:  0
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Deep Blue Sea

  1. #1
    JK6065's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    611
    Real Name
    Jeroen

    Deep Blue Sea

    Today I dripped about 4 litres of water with a camera in front of it. I tried some new things and one of them is capturing a water drop collision.
    Unfortunately I have to time the shot's by hand so it's difficult to get it all like I want it.

    Nevertheless, what do you think of this attempt.

    Deep Blue Sea
    0.6s . f/13.0 . ISO 200 . 125 mm Flash: manual 1/64

    Things to work on are still
    - only shooting the first two drops for a smoother surface
    - a deeper bin with more equal surface (you can see the bin through the water at some places)
    - Different colours
    - something for the timing to make that easier

  2. #2

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Jeroen

    Very good effort there. Four litres, eh?

    I can't remember now, did you see Ash's tutorial on Talk Photography? this one http://www.talkphotography.co.uk/for...d.php?t=208624 He uses aquarium pumps and lines (quite cheap) to pump the droplets - he gives the Amazon reference link.

    I think a little less exposure in yours, it seems on the point of blowing out. Do you use food dye for the colour? Why not use f/22 as you have plenty of flash power, or do you want some of the shot to be OOF?

    Ash also uses washing machine rinse to add viscosity to the water. I read somewhere else that a deeper dish creates a higher plume - which presumably affects the collision when it happens. I'm redoing my study/studio this week so I can't try this, but I'm keen to have a go next week.

    We could try the Hadron Collider next?

  3. #3
    JK6065's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    611
    Real Name
    Jeroen

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Well, as said before ( I don't know who said it) but it's quite addictive.

    I use something similar like on Ash's tutorial. The exposure was about correct, though I pushed it a bit in PS (too much?). I was looking for this bright and clear look with intense colours.
    For the colour I set the white balance to tungsten, though food dye would be interesting to experiment with in the future. So is the washing machine rinse, though I wonder what it'll do with the surface tension. Generally speaking soap eliminates surface tension and I doubt if that's preferable. Maybe it bit less surface tension would enable the drop to dig out a larger crater. I don't know yet.

    Well, if you want to risk yourself and your gear, the Hadron Collider would provide some spectacular sights for sure

  4. #4

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Quote Originally Posted by JK6065 View Post
    I use something similar like on Ash's tutorial. The exposure was about correct, though I pushed it a bit in PS (too much?). I was looking for this bright and clear look with intense colours.
    It's up to you, but if you want to post the RAW file http://uploading.com/ here I'll download it and try processing it. Send me the link if you do it.

  5. #5
    JK6065's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    611
    Real Name
    Jeroen

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    well, here it is. You may have a try, just tell me exactly what you did

  6. #6

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Quote Originally Posted by JK6065 View Post
    well, here it is. You may have a try, just tell me exactly what you did
    Thanks, Jeroen. I won't pretend - this wasn't easy. The main problem was there seemed to be quite a lot of noise/dust in the shot - probably just the surface of the water causing that.

    Here are the settings for RAW process. I used a lot of recovery to get rid of the blow-outs, but then increased the light areas on th the curves. Used vibrancy to boost the colour slightly.

    Deep Blue Sea Deep Blue Sea

    In CS4 I added a 'linear' curves layer to give a tad more contrast. The main problem was noise and debris. I used the healing tool to get rid of the debris and blotchy spots. I then selected the area outside the central plume and used /noise/dust and scratches in CS4 with a setting of '3'. This got rid of most of the 'dust' but also made the water more softer. Not sure if that really worked well. I cropped some off the top, and I also did a much tighter crop to match the original that you posted here.

    It strikes me that you need to get a very smooth even finish, and as you say, the colouring is important. I think you also need to get a lower angle, but the problem there is you will get the edge of the tin. How about (brainwave cap on here) putting a sheet of coloured waxed paper on the floor of the tin and curve it up at the back of the tin to create an 'infinity curve' as you would in a studio? That way you get the colour, you get a lower angle, and you might get a more interesting light.

    With slight crop off top
    Deep Blue Sea

    With full crop
    Deep Blue Sea

  7. #7
    JK6065's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    611
    Real Name
    Jeroen

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Again a splashing evening today

    The aim was a better tin, less surface reflection and better lighting. Therefore I used a larger white tin (instead of black), white light from the back and blue light from the top.
    I also adjusted my drop system for better control of the drop rate.
    (the hardest one to crack will be the timing of the shot, still figuring out...)

    Well here's just a nice cornet to begin with:

    Deep Blue Sea
    1s . f/18.0 . ISO 100 . 125 mm Flash: 1/64 manual

    and an "Umbrella" collision

    Deep Blue Sea
    1s . f/18.0 . ISO 100 . 125 mm Flash: 1/64 manual

  8. #8

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Excellent, Jeroen. Very good blue colour, and I love that umbrella. They are getting better, I think.

    I was looking at the latest from Ash over on Talk Photography earlier. It made we want to give up photography and take up sewing patchwork blankets.

  9. #9
    Rodders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Southland, New Zealand
    Posts
    104

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Amaizing shots there Jeroen!

  10. #10
    JK6065's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    611
    Real Name
    Jeroen

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Thank you for your kind words,

    Rob, I don't know if you're familiar with Martin Waughs work, but if you would need an extra reason to quit you'll find it here. It so amazing how he's able to get about any shape and situation in the water with colours everywhere. It's so inspiring!

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    1,541
    Real Name
    Sahil Jain

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Wow! The umbrella Collision is fantastic!

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Posts
    1,015
    Real Name
    Rick

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Hi, Jeroen;

    These are wonderful shots! I especially love the "umbrella." You're really hitting it (no pun intended).

    Cheers,
    Rick

  13. #13
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Windsor, Berks, UK
    Posts
    16,064
    Real Name
    Dave Humphries :)

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    Hi Jeroen,

    Just a line to add my not inconsiderable physical bulk to the well deserved congratulations.

    You have a fine set of images, but as you say, when you look at Martin Waugh's work ... it makes you want to try harder.

    I wonder if his colours are done in PP (I don't think so), using disimilar liquids, and/or by narrow slit lit with gelled flash(es)?

    Cheers,

  14. #14
    JK6065's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    611
    Real Name
    Jeroen

    Re: Deep Blue Sea

    a lot of things in his work are still a mystery for me, but there are some things you can do in colouring your droplets.

    At first you can ad colour to the flash light. The colour you ad to the background light will give any flat surfaces in the water that colour. The colour you ad to the light from above will give the verticals in the water a colour (the light hits the sculptures in an angle an reflects towards the camera). In my last two shots I used blue light from above and white light from the back.
    For visualisation I recommend this video. I know it's been posted several time but it's worth watching.

    You can also ad some colour to the drop liquid, by using food dye or something. This will only give the drops a colour and can be quite useful for collisions.

    Ash, the author of the tutorial Rob pointed out says about this:
    The basic rule is: the splash will be the colour of the droplets, the spout will be the colour of the base liquid and the water surface will be the colour of the reflector/back-lighting box.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •