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Thread: How do you know what's been post-processed? Does it matter?

  1. #21

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    Re: How do you know? Does it matter?

    Quote Originally Posted by ashwin View Post
    Comment and suggestion welcome

    How do you know what's been post-processed? Does it matter?
    Sorry Ashwin, but it just looks like a blown capture - I think you have to push things MUCH further to get away with it (I started with a full 3 stops).

  2. #22
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    Re: HIGH-KEY effect in Photoshop

    I feel that the image posted by Colin comes into the high contrast, rather than high key area. I'm a rank beginner, but my mind is somewhat set on this. To me, high key involves lighter greys through to whites with maybe the smallest token of black. I can see some colour high key, but in general, a high degree of desaturation is another necessity. But I'm not saying that someone else's interpretation is not correct. No way. It's like many areas of photography and image making, such as tone mapping - what blows one persons socks off is a travesty to someone else.

  3. #23

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    Re: HIGH-KEY effect in Photoshop

    Quote Originally Posted by Klickit View Post
    I feel that the image posted by Colin comes into the high contrast, rather than high key area. I'm a rank beginner, but my mind is somewhat set on this. To me, high key involves lighter greys through to whites with maybe the smallest token of black
    You could well be right, although forcing high amounts of contrast on an image will also give large areas of black whereas in my original high-key shot I kept the tonal range anchored, but pushed skintones up around 3 stops - so yes, it's increasing the contrast (by definition), but also up-shifting large portions of the tonal range. Whether or not this qualifies as high-key, I don't have a clue, as I don't shoot high-key

    Personally though, unless an image has enough black to "anchor" the tonal range - to me - they just look flat and bl**dy aweful.

  4. #24

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    Re: How do you know? Does it matter?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Humphries View Post
    It is about having a light toned subject on a light toned background, with very few mid or dark tones in the composition, say < 5% image content by area - now that scene should be properly exposed, so the whites come out white, not grey. You might 'get away with' a little pushing into over-exposure of some mid-toned background, but it won't (to me) be as good as if properly shot.


    So here's

    Dave, that is the look I would like to try for. When it is done well, I find it attractive.

    Thanks for all the replies! Donald, I am going to check on the availability/price of the book you mentioned. Colin, your photos always look great. Thanks for giving it a go even though it isn't your favourite style

    And yes, there are a lot of different examples and techniques for high key on the net! I tried a couple and was not really happy with the results. One involved creating an arc in levels until only the discernable elements of the photo remained and then converting it to black and white. The tutorial example look nice (baby's face), but my attempt did not.

    Thanks!
    Myra

  5. #25

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    Re: How do you know? Does it matter?

    Interesting discussion. I'm a big fan of what I define as High Key photographs. My definition is more in line of what Dave describes. I agree with Steve the definition does not really matter, but is it possible that there is confusion between what is termed as High key lighting as opposed to what is termed as High key photography. Don't know, but the high key lighting aspect that has been demonstrated here, is not something that would grab my attention. The white on white that I consider High Key though is a look that I really like. Same goes for Low Key.
    There are 3 nice examples at the link below. The spring thing, the rose, and the low key portrait near the bottom. I like them all. The one with the model in the red top is not something I would think of as high key, because of the bright red. That's just me though, I don't know where I came up with my definiton. I might have made it up myself.

    http://www.diyphotography.net/lighti...ey-and-low-key
    Last edited by ScoutR; 31st July 2010 at 12:06 PM. Reason: added info

  6. #26
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    Re: How do you know? Does it matter?

    2. Does it matter if the image is generally pleasing?
    I ask because I’ve seen the term “photoshopographer” and am not sure if that is someone who doesn’t bother to learn correct techniques and continually tries to “fix” their work in post processing, or if it is someone who goes overboard with PP effects.
    I do #2 , I suck it and see and if it doesn't work post it anyway as 'art', but in reality something didn't work. I like this but I can guarantee nobody else will but I like it because it shows what goes wrong in my camera at high iso and underexposed, with considerable noise reduction done twice with different methods but leaving essentially the essence, a candle, wall safe and flower.

    This is Low Key, I used to like B+W low key

    How do you know what's been post-processed? Does it matter?

  7. #27

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    Re: How do you know? Does it matter?

    Just to add my comments.......

    The following is my philosophy......High and low Key

    High key lighting is when all the tones in a scene are between middle gray and white. Low key is the opposite is when all the tones are between middle gray and black.

    • High Key
    o Contains tones ranging from white to 18% gray - Creates a 'light and bright' final image
    o Often conveys a youthful, open, and happy mood.
    o Mostly used to reduce contrast in the model's skin reducing visible blemishes and wrinkles.
    o Good high key photographs maintain edge separation between the subject and the white background.
    o Makes use a front lighting, careful not create a image that is too flat it becomes formless
    o Lighting ratio is usually less than 3:1

    • Low Key
    o Contains tones ranging from 18% gray to black
    o Often conveys a more serious, formal, dignified mood.
    o Mostly used to show the character, or personality of the model by emphasizing shape, texture, and making use of 'mood' lighting
    o Good low key maintains detail in the blackest shadow area.
    o Lighting requires more side and back lighting, to produce large shadow areas.
    o Makes good use of gobos, barn doors, or other light focusing devises.
    o Careful use of fill lights is necessary to maintain low-key mood while filling the shadows just enough to give detail.

  8. #28
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    Re: How do you know? Does it matter?

    Quote Originally Posted by willgoss View Post
    Just to add my comments.......

    The following is my philosophy......High and low Key

    High key lighting is when all the tones in a scene are between middle gray and white. Low key is the opposite is when all the tones are between middle gray and black.

    • High Key
    o Contains tones ranging from white to 18% gray - Creates a 'light and bright' final image
    o Often conveys a youthful, open, and happy mood.
    o Mostly used to reduce contrast in the model's skin reducing visible blemishes and wrinkles.
    o Good high key photographs maintain edge separation between the subject and the white background.
    o Makes use a front lighting, careful not create a image that is too flat it becomes formless
    o Lighting ratio is usually less than 3:1

    • Low Key
    o Contains tones ranging from 18% gray to black
    o Often conveys a more serious, formal, dignified mood.
    o Mostly used to show the character, or personality of the model by emphasizing shape, texture, and making use of 'mood' lighting
    o Good low key maintains detail in the blackest shadow area.
    o Lighting requires more side and back lighting, to produce large shadow areas.
    o Makes good use of gobos, barn doors, or other light focusing devises.
    o Careful use of fill lights is necessary to maintain low-key mood while filling the shadows just enough to give detail.
    That is very interesting; I see high key as a modelling/fashion thing where the photographer is trying to show detail in clothes and bright colours. It is not necessarily artistic but more functional to hide imperfections and is a clothes horse.

    Low key is mid tone to black where black is black without detail but hints or fools the viewer into seeing things suggested by shape, and the best low key to me includes over exposure but in a very tiny amount, like a light in the models eye.

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