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Thread: Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

  1. #1
    triggerhappy's Avatar
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    Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

    hi.

    I got this night shot yesterday taken from 60th floor of an observatory there.

    Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

    Enjoy.

    Mark
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    Last edited by triggerhappy; 27th June 2010 at 02:08 PM.

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    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

    I take it from the light trails on the right this was a long exposure. Were you using a high ISO?

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    Re: Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

    It was just 3 sec. I was a little hesitant that the left side will be over exposed.

    It was ISO 200.

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    Re: Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

    I'm kind of new to nighttime photography, but I read that it helps to focus the camera on a nearby image, what was your focal point in the image?

    Quote Originally Posted by triggerhappy View Post
    It was just 3 sec. I was a little hesitant that the left side will be over exposed.

    It was ISO 200.

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    Re: Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

    Very cool shot, Mark. It might be worth trying with a longer exposure, let the part on the left get blown. Is it so bright just because of a lot of the business and street lights? That's a lot of light.

    Cheers,
    Rick

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    Re: Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

    What I have found successful lately with night shots is the following:

    1. Select aperture priority and one stop smaller than maximum unless you need a far greater DOF and unless you want a longer exposure to register light trails

    2. Use a relatively high ISO 400 or more if required (again, unless you specifically want a longer exposure to provide light trails)

    3. Set exposure compensation to -1 stop

    4. Select auto exposure bracketing -1, 0, +1

    5. Select burst mode (I use low speed burst on my 30D and 40D cameras) Canon DSLR cameras will shoot a burst of three exposure bracketed shots and then stop.

    The above will provide three shots with the following exposure: two stops less than meter, one stop less than meter, as meter reads.

    Most often one of these three shots will be right in line with the exposure that I want for my scene. I have found by experience that if I did not decrease the exposure bracketed sequence, the +1 stop exposure is almost always over exposed and wasted - quite often too far gone even for HDR composites.

    If I use a tripod (which I frequently do when shooting night shots) I have the option of combining the shots into an HDR image if I desire to do so. Using a cord or cordless release will reduce the chance that the camera will shake due to your finger pressing the shutter release button. If no external release is available, the self-timer will allow any possible camera shake to dampen. The self-timer will work in the three shot mode on my Canon DSLR cameras.

    Of course, shooting at the magic hour, when the lights are on and there is still some residual daylight is probably the best time to shoot and will result in a more 3-D image since the buildings will be outlined.

    During the Winter season, daylight fades early while most buildings have their lights lit. I like shooting in Winter, at magic hour, during a work-day which will resut in the magic hour occurring early enough to catch buildings with all lights (including office window lights) lit.
    Last edited by rpcrowe; 27th June 2010 at 08:45 PM.

  7. #7
    triggerhappy's Avatar
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    Re: Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

    Thanks for the comment guys.

    I'm kind of new to nighttime photography, but I read that it helps to focus the camera on a nearby image, what was your focal point in the image?
    I just used my standard kitlens 18-55mm lens. So focusing would i think impossible. Focal point is 18mm.


    Very cool shot, Mark. It might be worth trying with a longer exposure, let the part on the left get blown. Is it so bright just because of a lot of the business and street lights? That's a lot of light.
    I'll try it next time. I really wonder what will be the outcome.


    What I have found successful lately with night shots is the following:

    1. Select aperture priority and one stop smaller than maximum unless you need a far greater DOF and unless you want a longer exposure to register light trails

    2. Use a relatively high ISO 400 or more if required (again, unless you specifically want a longer exposure to provide light trails)

    3. Set exposure compensation to -1 stop

    4. Select auto exposure bracketing -1, 0, +1

    5. Select burst mode (I use low speed burst on my 30D and 40D cameras) Canon DSLR cameras will shoot a burst of three exposure bracketed shots and then stop.

    The above will provide three shots with the following exposure: two stops less than meter, one stop less than meter, as meter reads.

    Most often one of these three shots will be right in line with the exposure that I want for my scene. I have found by experience that if I did not decrease the exposure bracketed sequence, the +1 stop exposure is almost always over exposed and wasted - quite often too far gone even for HDR composites.

    If I use a tripod (which I frequently do when shooting night shots) I have the option of combining the shots into an HDR image if I desire to do so. Using a cord or cordless release will reduce the chance that the camera will shake due to your finger pressing the shutter release button. If no external release is available, the self-timer will allow any possible camera shake to dampen. The self-timer will work in the three shot mode on my Canon DSLR cameras.

    Of course, shooting at the magic hour, when the lights are on and there is still some residual daylight is probably the best time to shoot and will result in a more 3-D image since the buildings will be outlined.

    During the Winter season, daylight fades early while most buildings have their lights lit. I like shooting in Winter, at magic hour, during a work-day which will resut in the magic hour occurring early enough to catch buildings with all lights (including office window lights) lit.
    Thanks for sharing your idea. I will try it also next time around. Would ND filter will be helpful too? I have ND-2 filter but I haven't use it yet.

    How long do you often set you exposure time for this kind of shot?

    Mark

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    Re: Nightshot at Ikebukuro, Tokyo, Japan

    Quote Originally Posted by triggerhappy View Post


    Would ND filter will be helpful too? I have ND-2 filter but I haven't use it yet.
    Hi, Mark;

    If you want to have a slower shutter speed to get longer light trails from cars, the ND2 will help you. ND2 lets half the light through, so a shutter speed twice as long gives the same exposure.

    Cheers,
    Rick

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