Helpful Posts Helpful Posts:  0
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: camera shake

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Barry, Wales
    Posts
    2

    camera shake

    Does image stabiliser feature on len/camera have influence on camera shake caused by mirror movement when operating the shutter release

  2. #2
    HaseebM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Chennai India
    Posts
    627
    Real Name
    Haseeb Modi

    Re: camera shake

    I don't think so, at least I have not seen any while using the IS feature in both 100mm Macro and 18 - 55mm. As far as I know, Mirror shake MAY be noticeable while doing long exposures such as in astrophotography. There is a disable feature ( mirror lock ) on my camera though.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    4,496
    Real Name
    wm c boyer

    Re: camera shake

    There is a specific SS range, somewhere in the range of 1/2 sec, that the vibration is not
    controlled by image stabilization even tripod mounted. You could use mirror lock-up to avoid it.
    More info...http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...mera-shake.htm

  4. #4
    Rob Zijlstra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    IJmuiden, The Netherlands
    Posts
    53
    Real Name
    Rob Zijlstra

    Re: camera shake

    Quote Originally Posted by chauncey View Post
    There is a specific SS range, somewhere in the range of 1/2 sec, that the vibration is not
    controlled by image stabilization even tripod mounted. You could use mirror lock-up to avoid it.
    More info...http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...mera-shake.htm
    You should never use IS with a tripod (at least in the Nikon world).

    The original question I'm not sure of. It's indeed a very interesting question!

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: camera shake

    Quote Originally Posted by fizzog View Post
    Does image stabiliser feature on len/camera have influence on camera shake caused by mirror movement when operating the shutter release
    According to Canon's Chuck Westfall, yes (at least on some models).

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    4,496
    Real Name
    wm c boyer

    Re: camera shake

    You should never use IS with a tripod (at least in the Nikon world).
    https://support.nikonusa.com/app/ans...nses-on-tripod

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: camera shake

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Zijlstra View Post
    You should never use IS with a tripod (at least in the Nikon world).

    The original question I'm not sure of. It's indeed a very interesting question!
    It's been "mantra" since IS units were first released, but in reality (in the Canon world anyway), it only applied to first and second generation IS units -- after that they had tripod detection built in, but even then it's not that cut and dried.

    The following is a snip from some eMails that Chuck Westfell and I exchanged a few years ago ...

    "Hi, Colin:

    For reasons known only to themselves, the folks who approve the instruction books in Japan usually seem to prefer leaving that section of the IS lens booklets somewhat ambiguous. I tried to get them to change the books for the IS super-telephotos (300/2.8L IS, 400/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, 600/4L IS and eventually 400/4 DO IS) 7 or 8 years ago, shortly after I stumbled upon the added capabilities of those lenses while testing them, but no dice. It looks like they are finally admitting that the "Tripod IS" mode that I described online several years ago actually exists, at least with the EF200mm f/2L IS USM lens that has just been released, but I doubt that the instructions for the older lenses will ever be rewritten.

    The IS mechanism in the EF70-200mm f/4L IS USM is effectively disabled when the lens detects that it is mounted on a tripod, as I previously described to you, but it is not as sophisticated as the ones in the IS super-telephotos because it does not correct for mirror slap or other subtle movement when the lens is mounted on a tripod. However, it is important to understand that this form of disabling is different than shutting off the IS function with the mode switch on the lens. In the latter case, the IS mechanism is centered and locked into place, whereas in the former case, the IS mechanism shifts the image downward slightly for a second or so, then stops moving. It's not moving, but it's not centered or locked, either. It's effectively on standby, so that it can resume its corrective capabilities instantly if movement is detected. Again, you can see this for yourself by looking through the viewfinder while pressing the shutter button halfway for at least several seconds, assuming the lens is mounted on a tripod and the IS switch is on.

    To my way of thinking, this is not the optimum way to use the equipment. In my opinion, if you use the EF70-200mm f/4L IS USM on a tripod, it would be best to turn off the IS mechanism via the switch on the lens, rather than depending on the tripod detection capabilities of the IS mechanism.

    Best Regards,

    Chuck Westfall
    Technical Advisor/Professional Products Marketing Division
    Consumer Imaging Group/Canon U.S.A., Inc.
    "

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Grafton, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,352
    Real Name
    Allan Short

    Re: camera shake

    Going with the tripod part, I shoot mostly landscapes I only remember to turn it off 20% of the time. That said I have often set up a shot in 20mph winds, on wooden platforms when someone walks by the hold thing moves, how about in sand and the water is lapping around the legs or even in the middle of a stream with the lower 1/4 to 1/2 the length of the legs are in the water. Will turning off the VR when on the tripod make any difference I think not.
    As for mirror slap vibration I could see if shooting something in the 1/8 to 1/2 seconds, however if one of the subjects is moving say lapping water is it going to make any difference, however it the object is in a controlled environment and there is no chance of movement and you are shooting that slow OK lock it up but if the shot is 30 seconds is it going to make a difference to the sharpness of the image again I think not.
    The thing is in the real world of shooting one rule does not fix all things.
    Just my humble opinion.

    Cheers:

    Allan

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •