Helpful Posts Helpful Posts:  0
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Canon 50D weight

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Egypt
    Posts
    23

    Canon 50D weight

    I wounder if the heavy cameras such as Canon 50D would be hard to travel with and take lots of family pics, etc? would weight makes hand shaking when hold for too much? does it need a tripod for it's weight? or should it be skipped and go for something lighter like the 500D if one was searching for portability over performance? excuse me for asking lots of questions similar to each other, I hope you've got my point. thxx

  2. #2
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Windsor, Berks, UK
    Posts
    16,231
    Real Name
    Dave Humphries :)

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    Hi Ashooor,

    So, having looked it up, that's 730g vs 480g, both weights are without battery or memory card (or of course, a lens!).

    Quite a difference, although by the time those missing items are added to both, the difference will be less (as a percentage of total I mean).

    My D5000 (560g), plus a 'chunky' 18-200mm comes out at about 1120g, it is quite heavy after a while, but I think I need a better strap

    Cheers,

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    Quote Originally Posted by ashooor View Post
    I wounder if the heavy cameras such as Canon 50D would be hard to travel with and take lots of family pics, etc? would weight makes hand shaking when hold for too much? does it need a tripod for it's weight? or should it be skipped and go for something lighter like the 500D if one was searching for portability over performance? excuse me for asking lots of questions similar to each other, I hope you've got my point. thxx
    In theory, the higher the weight, the less camera shake, as it's harder to change the camera's position due to the increased mass. In reality though, good technique has a LOT to do with it (keeping camera braced over your centre-of-gravity - hand/arm position - breathing etc).

    Joe McNally (who's shot more covers of National Geographic than I've ever read) did a short video on how he does it (I've seen him shoot 1/20th of a sec in an aircraft and still have a sharp shot)

  4. #4
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    30,326
    Real Name
    John

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    I've found that even with a good strap the heavier cameras and lenses create a lot of stress on the neck and shoulder muscles. So a good arm support is necessary and you should not rely on the strength of the strap to protect the camera. The same goes for taking photographs, the bulk of the camera will create stress on the arms and even with a good vibration reduction system you will still get blurry images unless you use a tripod or nearby support. Also, holding the camera steady will be even more difficult if you are photographing from a moving vehicle.

  5. #5
    PopsPhotos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Washington (state) USA
    Posts
    984
    Real Name
    Pops

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    I use a strap on my lighter cameras, but have mounted harnesses on the heavier ones. This helps a lot when spending more than a few hours lugging the thing around.

    Heavier cameras do reduce some shake, but not enough to be noticeable after an hour or more of holding the thing up to your eye. I don't find the heavier cameras bothersome and actually prefer the psychological feeling of having a tool in my hands, rather than a toy. (That comment should get some feedback. )

    Pops

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    466

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    seriously? my 50d and 70-200 f4L is my everyday , walk around setup. even wear it hiking...so i guess u might want to try it yourself..it just sounds like a bizarre question.. I have no idea how large or how strong u are...my take on it really is this.....

    If a better picture quality is important too you, then you'll find a way too put up with the weight....
    Last edited by kevinbythebeach; 1st January 2010 at 04:33 AM.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    466

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    (I've seen him shoot 1/20th of a sec in an aircraft and still have a sharp shot)
    yah but what lens?
    Last edited by Dave Humphries; 2nd January 2010 at 08:15 AM. Reason: fix quote tag

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    82

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    There's no doubt in my mind that a 40D is easier to hold steady than a 400D (these are comparable to the 50D and 500D). The larger grip makes it easier to hold and the extra mass helps to resist camera shake. It is noticably larger and heavier, but I don't find that to be a problem myself. Having said that, I kept my 400D and I still use it quite a lot with a light lens, particularly outdoors. You can get a couple of stops worth of stability, even with a smaller camera, just by leaning against something.

    Will

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    South Devon, UK
    Posts
    11,601

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    It really just comes down to what you are comfortable with.

    Personally I prefer a larger heavier camera (currently use a 40D) with large easy to read dials and controls that I can grip easily. And the heavier cameras give a better balance if you regularly use larger lenses. I wouldn't want one of the 400D range now.

    Some people do find the 40/50D difficult to hold and heavy to carry all day. For me, after a lifetime of hard physical work, carrying a heavy camera plus a couple of large lenses and a tripod on a 2 or 3 mile trek is an absolute holiday! (I was a commercial fisherman for 35 years).

    But different people have varied requirements; hence 2 ranges of cameras from both Canon and Nikon.

  10. #10
    Amberglass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    343

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    Quote Originally Posted by kevinbythebeach View Post
    yah but what lens?

    How's this Kevin. Shot with a Canon 40D with 50 mm f1.4 (stepped down to f4), ISO 1600, hand held at 1/6th shutter speed. I took this shot on a dare from my son, who asked me how well I can hold still. Not bad for an old broad.

    Canon 50D weight

    All it takes is proper hand and body ergonomics/gripping and breathing techniques. 3 deep breathes in, slowly releasing the 3rd breathe as you release the shutter release. It's the same breathing technique that marksmen uses to steady their aim and accurately make their marks.

  11. #11
    Amberglass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    343

    Re: Canon 50D weight

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    In theory, the higher the weight, the less camera shake, as it's harder to change the camera's position due to the increased mass. In reality though, good technique has a LOT to do with it (keeping camera braced over your centre-of-gravity - hand/arm position - breathing etc).

    Joe McNally (who's shot more covers of National Geographic than I've ever read) did a short video on how he does it (I've seen him shoot 1/20th of a sec in an aircraft and still have a sharp shot)
    Weight is a necessary evil in photography as Colin mentioned. Fatigue is another factor that can cause camera shake were weight can also be beneficial to steady your hands.

    If you're using a non image stabilizing lens and worry about camera shake, but don't want to carry a mono/tripod. This is the poor man's version to the correct the problem. Not going below 1/60th of a shutter speed (or no lower than your focal length) for most beginners will avoid blurring images depending on the available lighting.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Af3aJ...rom=PL&index=3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •