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Thread: dslr display vs computer display

  1. #1

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    dslr display vs computer display

    I use a nikon d5100 camera. When I viewed photos from the camera's LCD display, they looks well saturated, colourful and vibrant. However when viewed from a computer display they look somewhat dull with less saturation. I tried with several computer monitors as well as a LED TV display. But the result is the same. What will be wrong. I'm not an advanced photographer but I have a basic knowledge to handle a DSLR. Is it a problem with my photography skills and techniques? How can i overcome this problem?

  2. #2
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    Is the LCD on your camera set to neutral brightness? How about your computer monitor?

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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    Were you shooting in RAW? and with what software did you open your shots in your computer?

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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    I took the photos in RAW. I viewed it with viewsonic VA1716W monitor in windows photo viewer.. The camera's LCD display brightness is neutral.

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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    Quote Originally Posted by pramodjayawardana View Post
    I took the photos in RAW. I viewed it with viewsonic VA1716W monitor in windows photo viewer.. The camera's LCD display brightness is neutral.
    HI,

    I asked because when I view my RAW images (shot with the same cam as yours, Nikon D5100), it also looks dull, underexposed when opened in LR4.4. But looks ok when opened in ViewNX2. Perhaps, you want to try opening in ViewNX2.

    Hope this helps.

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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    The two displays technologies really aren't comparable even from a basic monitor standpoint but that's only part of the consideration. Your camera is also applying the picture handling parameters the factory or you set for jpeg output. Unless you are using Nikon software, ViewNX or CaptureNX, then that appearance information will not be passed on to another editing process other than as a preset (eg Camera Calibration in LR)). You will have to re-add all that info and manipulate the data to get the picture, on a monitor or print, that you want. That's the purpose of raw data handling programs such as Lightroom, Elements, Gimp, etc.
    Last edited by Andrew1; 13th April 2013 at 03:27 PM.

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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    Hi pramodjayawardana,

    If you have started shooting RAW, you should know (or will soon learn) that you cannot expect the RAW image to be usable without some Post Processing (PP).

    As others have said, the image on the LCD has had some PP done to it (in camera), so that's why it looks better.

    I am trying to think of an analogy to the comparison you are making and the best I can up with is that if you buy a packet meal with dried ingredients, it will have a picture of the cooked meal on the packet, but if you tip out the ingredients onto a plate without cooking them, it won't look the same!

    However, it is more complex than that, there may be other factors at play - what colour-space are you shooting with? If the camera is set to AbodeRGB, windows photo-viewer may not know (or deal with) this and may be displaying assuming it is sRGB and that will give desaturated results.

    Photography is a big learning curve, especially when you're just starting digital and RAW, as I think you may be - but stick around, ask questions and we can help.


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  8. #8

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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    If the camera display shows enhanced previews. Can someone rely on it for adjusting the exposure settings. Generally we used to look for the preview to judge and adjust the exposure at the photography locations.

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    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    Quote Originally Posted by pramodjayawardana View Post
    If the camera display shows enhanced previews. Can someone rely on it for adjusting the exposure settings. Generally we used to look for the preview to judge and adjust the exposure at the photography locations.
    No, not really - I use the RGB histogram and blinkies (on my D5000)

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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    Quote Originally Posted by pramodjayawardana View Post
    Is it a problem with my photography skills and techniques?
    NO!!!!

    Hi Pramod,

    You should not let that little screen be an issue to you. I have also noticed the same thing and soon realised that the little LCD on the back of the camera is just a tool to review weather I got the shot or not. The more experienced you get the less you will use that little screen. It all depends on how intense the light is when you look at the LCD on the camera, and as mentioned, how bright you set it.

    What I have done is to “calibrate” my monitor as close as possible to the prints I had printed at a professional lab. Even though the image on the LCD on my camera may differ from what the image looks like on my computer monitor, I got used to compensating for the difference.

    Set your camera to default. All settings must be either natural, normal, neutral and/or default. Have a few images printed at a pro lab, straight out of camera and see how big a difference there is between the print and the camera LCD. Then you compare it to the images on your computer monitor and adjust your monitor to look like the print. Thereafter you will know how to compensate and what you can expect your prints to look like.

    I do not calibrate my monitor to my home based printer. My personal opinion is that prints from a professional lab should determine how you will adjust your camera and home based monitor. Unless of cause you have a very good printer at home and do most of your printing yourself.

    Most labs use sRGB. Set your camera to sRGB. Printed images are usually more vibrant and saturated than what you see on the computer monitor. You got to be careful not to over-saturate for images you will have printed at a lab.

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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    Thank you very much for all the replies. All your opinions are top most valuable for a person like me who just stepped to the world of photography.

  12. #12
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    Re: dslr display vs computer display

    Pramod

    Using the rear screen for anything other than a very quick check is all that you should do.

    As has been said it is a camera processed jpeg image, and if you are shooting RAW and post processing those RAW images, then the ultimate results should be much better.

    (and remember that a similar dichotomy occurs between computer screen and printer where you need to profile and adjust the equipment and image)

    Andre's comment regards sRGB is also very relevant if your shots are looking muted.

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