Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    3,594
    Real Name
    Greg

    Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    I want to purchase a remote shutter release for my Canon. There are two options: cable or wireless, both about the same price. From what I have read on retailers' websites, it seems only the cable release allows you to execute long exposures. ie with the cable you hold the button down for as long as you require, whereas the wireless fires off instantaneously. Is that right? Are there particular advantages to either type?
    Last edited by FootLoose; 1st March 2013 at 08:58 AM. Reason: wandering apostrophe

  2. #2

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Greg they come in all flavors so here is a site to start looking into to find just what your looking for. Hope this helps.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Re...8/N/4077634555

  3. #3
    Moderator GrumpyDiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    12,357
    Real Name
    Manfred Mueller

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    I can't comment on Canon specifically, but there are advantages and disadvantages to both approaches. There are three approaches out there; wired. wireless infra-red (IR) and RF (radio frequency). I'm going to stick to the Canon branded solutions, rather than the third party ones.

    1. Infra-Red - you have already mentioned long manual exposures. Add to that reliability of release. The wireless ones use infra-red light and your positioning has to be aligned with the camera's built in sensor to work. It is battery operated, so if your battery dies, you have no remote control. Range will be longer than the wired one, but not as long as the RF. These units are quite inexpensive. This type of unit works well for tripod mounted self-portraits. You must have a camera with an IR receiver built in for these to work. This generally means that some of the most expensive camera bodies might not support them.

    2. Wired - I find these to be generally more consistent than the IR model and as long as you are attached to the camera, you can fire this type of unit from any position. Some units have a "lock" position, so when shooting bulb mode, you can keep the shutter open indefinitely. No batteries increases reliability, but they can be susceptible to mechanical issues, either with the wires or with the electrical contacts with the camera. I tend to use one for long exposure tripod shots. These are generally fairly inexpensive, although the ones for the pro bodies tend to cost more than the IR units.

    3. RF - I haven't used the shutter release types (just the ones for off-camera flash). They tend to be the most expensive solution (and not one you seem to be considering). Their downside is generally high cost, especially the ones that are put out by the camera supplier, need batteries to operate and need to be mechanically connected to your camera body. They have long range, and can be used outside of line-of-sight applications (although their range is affected by physical structures, like buildings). The are often more than just simple remote release triggers and can have intravelometer functionality (time exposures, trigger at specific time, etc.) functions built in. They range from expensive (when compared to the other solutions) to very expensive when you look at their costs.

  4. #4

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    I use a third party for Canon. No problems at all, just need to keep extra batteries in case you need to change them out. I can live with that and it works like a charm. Will do the long exposures also and much more.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ss_Remote.html

  5. #5
    Thlayle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    243
    Real Name
    Randy Butters

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Greg, I'm shooting with a Canon and one of their wireless remotes. It works great! I believe there's no difference in functionality between it and wired remotes. For long exposures, just set it on 'bulb' and hit the remote. Shorter exposures - no problem.

    Also, consider buying it from another party, not Canon. I bought mine through a vendor at Amazon.com and it was ridiculously cheap. I even bought a second one (not Canon brand) because it was literally just pennies in cost. I have stuck the Canon though -- it works so well, no reason to even try the other.

  6. #6
    RustBeltRaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    1,009
    Real Name
    Lex

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    I use a Canon RC-6 infrared remote for slow-shutter and bulb shots with a monopod or tripod. For short-range work when you really want to avoid touching the camera, it's great, but I'm normally using it at a range of about 6in (~15cm).

    To put some numbers on Manfred's qualitative information, I have a trio of Pocket Wizard FlexTTL5 radios (finnicky, but useful), which can be used as remote triggers, and are one of the longest-range solutions. They list at $220 apiece (eBay got me well under that), and you need 2 (receiver and transmitter) to trigger a camera. The cable to connect the receiver to the camera costs more than Canon's RC-6 IR trigger. Fortunately, there are middle-of-the-road options like the Vello FreeWave radio trigger ($60 for a 100m range, bulb-compatible transmitter and receiver) at the top of the page Carl linked.
    Last edited by RustBeltRaw; 4th March 2013 at 02:05 PM. Reason: Technical correction.

  7. #7
    Thlayle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    243
    Real Name
    Randy Butters

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Greg (and Lex): I'm thinking it must be a model version or something. That is not my experience at all with the RC-6. On long exposures, using bulb mode, I just click the button and everything works, no holding the button. Maybe it is specific to the camera instead (I am shooting with a T2i (550D). Otherwise, on the timed settings in manual mode, just click the button and it stays on and shuts off at the time you set it for.

    So maybe check your camera model with Canon if you are thinking of pairing it with the RC-6. I can say that it works fine with my camera -- no annoying button holding.

  8. #8
    Thlayle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    243
    Real Name
    Randy Butters

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Quote Originally Posted by RustBeltRaw View Post
    I use a Canon RC-6 infrared remote for slow-shutter and bulb shots with a monopod or tripod. For bulb shots, you have to hold the transmitter's button for the whole duration of the shot. Not bad for anything up to about 1 minute, but something of a pain for really long exposures. For short-range work when you really want to avoid touching the camera, it's great, but I'm normally using it at a range of about 6in (~15cm).

    To put some number's on Manfred's qualitative information, I have a trio of Pocket Wizard FlexTTL5 radios (finnicky, but useful), which can be used as remote triggers, and are one of the longest-range solutions. They list at $220 apiece (eBay got me well under that), and you need 2 (receiver and transmitter) to trigger a camera. The cable to connect the receiver to the camera costs more than Canon's RC-6 IR trigger. Fortunately, there are middle-of-the-road options like the Vello FreeWave radio trigger ($60 for a 100m range, bulb-compatible transmitter and receiver) at the top of the page Carl linked.
    I have to add this too: as well as working without continuous holding of the button, the remote works as Canon claims -up to 2 meters away and the cost, even from Canon is much lower than the other brands mentioned here. However, there IS the MUCH shorter remote range (just 2 meters vs. the much farther distances cited) and it is DIRECTIONAL, meaning you have to be in front of the camera's infrared sensor. Maybe these radio remotes work better in that respect but it seems they cost a lot more.

  9. #9
    DanK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    3,711
    Real Name
    Dan

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    I use both. For simple things, I use a Yongnuo cable release I bought on eBay. they are dirt cheap, work fine, and have a slider to hold the shutter open. For more complex things, I use a Hahenel Gigabit Pro II wireless release:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._T_Pro_II.html

    It takes a bit to master, but it does everything. For single shots, it will start after a delay if you want, and it will hold the shutter open however long you tell it to. You can overlay a second program to take a series of shots--e.g., repeating the shot specified in the first program at a set interval, for a number of cycles you set.

    If you are interested in night photography with long exposures, the wireless wins hands down. You don't have to look at a watch, you don't need to risk ruining the exposure by turning on a flashlight to see a watch, and you can walk away and go somewhere screened if there are a lot of mosquitoes. For indoor macro work, I usually use the simpler cable release.

  10. #10
    dje's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brisbane Australia
    Posts
    4,148
    Real Name
    Dave Ellis

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Greg I use an RC-6 with my 600D. It works in Bulb mode by pressing it once to operate the shutter and pressing it a second time to close the shutter. This may vary between camera models however. I'd check your camera handbook to see if it has an IR receiver and how it works with the RC-6.

    I don't have a cable release but I understand with those you can half-depress the shutter as if you were using the shutter button on the camera. You can't so that with the RC-6. That's never been a problem for me but I guess it depends what you want to use it for.

    Dave

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    3,594
    Real Name
    Greg

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Thank you everyone, this has been really helpful and enlightening. I have a Canon 600D and the manual says either the RC-6 (wireless) or the RS-60E3 (cable) are suitable, but what concerned me is the note that says the RC-6 either fires instantly or with a 2 second delay. That didn't sound like it allowed timed exposures, but you have cleared that up for me.

    The manual also says that after pressing the button the camera autofocuses. I assume that is only in automode and that it will not adjust anything if you are shooting in Av or Manual.

  12. #12
    inkista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    1,398
    Real Name
    Kathy Li

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Whether you used wired or wireless, you'll have both half-press and full press with the triggers. The AF will happen at the half-press.

    I use all three. I have cable release for when I want to work behind the camera (IR remotes, it can be awkward getting the remote to point towards the sensor which is either on the front of the grip, or in the recessed valley between the grip and the lens). I use the long-discontinued RC-1 as an IR remote for when I want to work in front of it at relatively close range. And I'll repurpose my cheap flash triggers (Yongnuo RF-602s, abou5t $30 for the pair) for when I need to get past the line-of-sight or range limitations of the IR remote. With the Yongnuos, I use the transmitter as my remote, and I plug a shutter release cable into the receiver and connect it to the cable release port.

    My fourth and fifth tools for this kind of fun would be the smartphone TriggertrapMobile app (I use the iOS version with an iPodTouch), with cable and dongle, and the Magic Lantern firmware add-on. ML can add capabilities like an intervalometer, trap focus, and automated HDR bracketing (i.e., the camera analyzes the light and, with a set exposure interval), calculates how many bracketed images are needed to cover the full DR to extinction on both ends of the histogram, and with a single shutter press, takes the entire bracketed set). There's also bulb ramping (i.e., taking images at set intervals, and adjusting the exposure between shots for changing light intervals, as in, say, a timelapse of a sunset).

  13. #13
    dje's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brisbane Australia
    Posts
    4,148
    Real Name
    Dave Ellis

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Quote Originally Posted by FootLoose View Post
    The manual also says that after pressing the button the camera autofocuses. I assume that is only in automode and that it will not adjust anything if you are shooting in Av or Manual.
    Greg it will autofocus if the lens is set to autofocus, irrespective of the shooting mode the camera is set to.

    Dave

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    3,594
    Real Name
    Greg

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Ah ... of course. Thanks Dave.

  15. #15

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gujarat, India
    Posts
    171
    Real Name
    Bedanta

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Hi Greg, I have an Aputure CRC Combo Camera Shutter Control with wired and wireless for Canon which works fine in both the modes:

    http://www.amazon.com/Aputure-Shutte.../dp/B008BX60TS

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    396
    Real Name
    Yes

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    I always carry a cabled release - small, compact and if not canon make cheap, always works without needing a battery.

    I also have cheap units from China, no problems

    Also have Hahnel Giga T Pro II 2.4GHz Wireless Timer Remote, great apart from it turns off after a minute of not pressing a button, and its a pain to have to keep turning on, and sometimes moving to the function one wishes to use, I suspect there are better units for the price unless they have improved this model and removed whayt I consider a defect.

    The expensive wireless solutions, ie lots of cash are just that, expensive. They don't do more than much cheaper units.

  17. #17
    RustBeltRaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    1,009
    Real Name
    Lex

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    Quote Originally Posted by Thlayle View Post
    Greg (and Lex): I'm thinking it must be a model version or something. That is not my experience at all with the RC-6. On long exposures, using bulb mode, I just click the button and everything works, no holding the button. Maybe it is specific to the camera instead (I am shooting with a T2i (550D). Otherwise, on the timed settings in manual mode, just click the button and it stays on and shuts off at the time you set it for.
    Randy is correct, and I have changed my original post. I had a brain fart and confused my RC-6 with an old (but functional) Hähnel IR remote I've since replaced.

    Quote Originally Posted by inkista
    ...and the Magic Lantern firmware add-on. ML can add capabilities like an intervalometer, trap focus, and automated HDR bracketing...
    While some wired and wireless triggers (Vello ShutterBoss) can be used as intervalometers, I second Kathy's Magic Lantern recommendation (if your camera's compatible). It adds some really handy tools at no cost.

  18. #18
    arith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Burton on Trent, UK
    Posts
    4,788
    Real Name
    Steve

    Re: Remote Shutter Release: Cable or Wireless?

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/JYC-Digital-...411069&sr=1-11

    Works fine on my 50D, but take care setting the interval which has to be greater than the exposure.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •