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Thread: I'm wondering if the metering system is telling it it's too dark

  1. #1

    I'm wondering if the metering system is telling it it's too dark

    I did a quick google on the camera and as far as I could tell it's quite a normal DSLR.

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    Remco

    Re: I'm wondering if the metering system is telling it it's too dark

    Well, with the ample information provided, I'm sure you'll get a lot of useful answers...

  3. #3
    Administrator Manfred M's Avatar
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    Manfred Mueller

    Re: I'm wondering if the metering system is telling it it's too dark

    A camera uses a reflective light metering systems, so the camera's designers have built in some assumptions of what an "average" scene looks like into the metering algorithms. If you take a picture of a scene that is not close to the design point, it will fool the meter and deliver results that are too light or too dark.

    That being said, you can only tell if this is the case by looking at the camera's histogram display or viewing the image on a computer monitor, as you camera's built in screen is not a good way to judge exposure.

  4. #4

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    J stands for John

    Re: I'm wondering if the metering system is telling it it's too dark

    I wonder if you are using a manual or semi-manual mode? If you work in auto mode the camera will take the photo whatever the light level.
    In the manual modes if the lens is not fast enouugh the camera might have a mode which stops it taking the photo at that shutter speed.
    The camera needs to be adequately supported when working in auto mode to stop camera shake with a long exposuire in your hands. Digital cameras are wonderful and can take pictures in most light levels but their operator needs to understand that in low light levels the camera does it by picking a long opening of the shutter ... if the camera moves ever so slightly during this long opening the picture will be bluirred. Even if the camera is kept stationary if the subject moves it will be blurred.

    You are new here with this your first post and perhaps the camera is new to you and you to photography so even though you have a DSLR it is worth while using auto until you get to know the camera and maybe photography better. When I bought my last camera it was so complicated I worked in auto until I started to get the hang of what all the knobs on the camera were and could do for me

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