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Thread: Auburndale Park in Fall

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    Alis's Avatar
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    Auburndale Park in Fall

    It is basically my first landscape. It is a bit boring but I thought it is better to post it here to get some comments, so please trash it if you like

    Auburndale Park in Fall
    Last edited by Alis; 26th October 2009 at 12:54 AM.

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Great shot Alis! This would have been a perfect canidate for HDR. I love the fall colors. Looks like the walkway has a bit of a red tint. Theres a few spots that seem to be crushed to black a little bit -- a little fill light in ACR would help that.

    Again, great shot!

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Quote Originally Posted by KentDub View Post
    Great shot Alis! This would have been a perfect canidate for HDR. I love the fall colors. Looks like the walkway has a bit of a red tint. Theres a few spots that seem to be crushed to black a little bit -- a little fill light in ACR would help that.

    Again, great shot!
    Thanks, Kent! Wow! You are right on target. Actually I am not sure if you commented on the first file I uploaded or the one that is here currently because I noticed the red tint and changed it immediately but I might have been late.

    Also, I agree with the black clipping point, I tried to be "aggressive", just did not know how much is enough!

    This is actually supposed to be an HDR, I have three shots of it, but I am not really good at using Photomatrix and thought just use this middle shot to play around.

    Thanks for the comments.

    Alis

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Hi Ali,

    You don't need HDR for this kind of shot - more than enough DR in a RAW capture (and then some)

    Nice composition - colours look great - BUT - you've over-sharpened the high-frequency components (making them frosty). I've added a blur over the image and then re-sharpened to give you an idea (unfortunately I can't get it any better without the original).

    Auburndale Park in Fall

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Thanks, Colin. Looks much better. I am still having difficulty with selecting the right setting for USM. But I am slowly reading the Fraiser's book will get there soon hopefully. The other reason I overdid it was that when I got home and looked at the images, I realized I did not focus on any specific point in the picture! I guess that is one thing I have to remember next time.

    Also about the need for HDR, I agree with you that it is not needed in this image, except for those areas of sky showing in between the leaves that are basically blown out. There is more sky in these shots that I cropped for this paticular image and the HDR was planned to take care of the larger sky area on top of rest of them.

    I am still trying to learn how to confidently carry all the gear with me and not trip. I had to try a few different postions to find the best way to carry the camera on top of the tripod. Hard!

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Quote Originally Posted by Alis View Post
    I am still having difficulty with selecting the right setting for USM.
    Do your capture sharpening first (300/0.3) - creative sharpening 2nd (perhaps 40/4 for this kind of image) - THEN down-sample the image and do output sharpening if needed (probably something like 150/0.3 for this kind of image but that MAY give too much frosting). Best trick is to simply toggle the preview off and on several times and see what it does to the image.


    when I got home and looked at the images, I realized I did not focus on any specific point in the picture! I guess that is one thing I have to remember next time.
    If you're stopped down you normally won't have to worry too much about that - your DoF will take care of it.

    Also about the need for HDR, I agree with you that it is not needed in this image, except for those areas of sky showing in between the leaves that are basically blown out.
    Yes - but that's going to look better than lowering the tones of the foliage - it's pretty normal for this kind of scene. You could always try recovering the tones with the under-exposed shot from the bracket you took.

    I am still trying to learn how to confidently carry all the gear with me and not trip. I had to try a few different postions to find the best way to carry the camera on top of the tripod. Hard!
    So long as my brackets are tight, I just hold it a bit "like a baby" with the business end in my left elbow (and left forearm reaching around from underneath) and my right arm grabbing the rest from over the top - seems to balance quite well. Wouldn't want to do it with a cheap ballhead though! (takes a little while to trust the mounting hardware with about 15 grands worth of camera and lens attached!).

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Actually I am not sure if you commented on the first file I uploaded or the one that is here currently because I noticed the red tint and changed it immediately but I might have been late.
    The red cast seems to be gone I must have jumped the gun to critique.

    Also, I agree with the black clipping point, I tried to be "aggressive", just did not know how much is enough!
    It's a bit extreme for my taste. I think you can still accomplish the nice constrast you have without crushing the blacks. Some of the tree branches are going to black, which causes my eye to go stright to them, as it disrupts the flow of the image.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alis View Post
    Also about the need for HDR, I agree with you that it is not needed in this image, except for those areas of sky showing in between the leaves that are basically blown out.
    I agree - that is what I was referring to. A strong blue sky would add an extra color element to the image that would really compliment it. I have a feeling that it was an overcast day, but nothing a little PP can't fix!

    Quote Originally Posted by Alis View Post
    I am still trying to learn how to confidently carry all the gear with me and not trip. I had to try a few different postions to find the best way to carry the camera on top of the tripod. Hard!
    You've got guts! I got myself a cheap manfrotto tripod to hold me over until I can afford the Gitzo I want. It holds my 5dmkII with my 24-105mm fine at moderate angles. Extremes though it slips, and because if this I wouldn't dream of moving the camera while on the tripod. Quick-release and put the neckstrap on and just carry the tripod for me.

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    Wouldn't want to do it with a cheap ballhead though! (takes a little while to trust the mounting hardware with about 15 grands worth of camera and lens attached!).
    Well, it is BH-55 PCL for ballhead (Really Right Stuff) and GT3541LS Gitzo CF6X for tripod. I just followed your recommendation and I am happy with it. I can put my whole car on it!

    Then I have the bracket for 70-200mm f/2.8 and that combination is really heavy. And what I noticed is that although the bracket to ball head attachment is nice and tight, the lens to camera attachment is not that great and it wobbles (trying to find the right word but it not as tight) so I was wondering what is the point of being so accurate with zero pixel drift for the ball head and tripod but having a loose connection somewhere else?

    In that Real World Sharpenning book, I noticed a picture of Jeff shooting a sandbag on top of a long lens. I thought it is to prevent movement of the camera on the lens perhaps?

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Quote Originally Posted by Alis View Post
    I can put my whole car on it!
    Now THAT'S a shot I'd like to see! (would certainly top the shot of me standing on mine!)

    the lens to camera attachment is not that great and it wobbles (trying to find the right word but it not as tight) so I was wondering what is the point of being so accurate with zero pixel drift for the ball head and tripod but having a loose connection somewhere else?
    I get a bit of "rotational slop" in mine - is that what you mean?

    In that Real World Sharpenning book, I noticed a picture with Jeff taking a picture on a long lens with a sandbag on top of the lens. I thought it is to prevent movement of the camera on the lens perhaps?
    Yes - I don't use one personally - if shutterspeeds are high enough I sometimes just lean down on the whole rig ("human sandbag"). They can also be used for :low level" tripods.

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    I get a bit of "rotational slop" in mine - is that what you mean?
    It rotates a little but I feel there is a gap between the two rings (on camera and on the lens) so the lens moves from one side to the other when I push it,not that much though but nevertheless it is there. May be it is my camera? Because I can feel it on more than one lens.

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Since we're on the topic of carrying camera... What are your thoughts on carrying the camera "by the lens"? When I have the grip on my camera it is much easier to hold the camera while walking by the lens where it meets the camera body. It feels pretty sturdy - but if I'm going to tweak the mount over time I'd like to know.

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    I'd hold the heaviest bit as a rule

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Quote Originally Posted by KentDub View Post
    Since we're on the topic of carrying camera... What are your thoughts on carrying the camera "by the lens"?
    I do - I can't see it as being any different from the camera hanging off a long lens mount.

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    Re: Auburndale Park in Fall

    Quote Originally Posted by Alis View Post
    It rotates a little but I feel there is a gap between the two rings (on camera and on the lens) so the lens moves from one side to the other when I push it,not that much though but nevertheless it is there. May be it is my camera? Because I can feel it on more than one lens.
    Not sure to be honest; if it works OK I'd probably be inclined not to worry about it. Perhaps compare to someone elses if you get the chance?

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