Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Shutter speed

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    7
    Real Name
    Uzma

    Shutter speed

    Hi, please can someone help me with the following..have seen many wonderful photos with an action photo eg a horse rider or biker,,where the central figure is totally in focus and the bavkground is streaky to give an idea about the motion..i know its a commonly used technique.. What settings would those be ..thanks so much

  2. #2
    Andrew76's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,300
    Real Name
    Andrew

    Re: Shutter speed

    Hi Uzma. I think judging by how you've described your desired outcome, that you're talking about a 'panning' shot. You still want to have a fairly quick shutter speed - say around 1/200 depending on what you're shooting, and how fast it's moving, then, what you'll have to do is follow the subject you want in sharp focus with your camera, and snap the shot at the appropriate time.

    This will freeze the subject, and give you that 'streaky' background you desire. It takes some practice, to say the least! I often sit in the front yard and shoot cars driving by to hone my skills. It helps to try with different settings too, and see what types of artistic effects you can create!

    Hope this helps you out a little??

  3. #3
    rpcrowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    13,306
    Real Name
    Richard

    Re: Shutter speed

    Quote Originally Posted by Uzzfuzz View Post
    Hi, please can someone help me with the following..have seen many wonderful photos with an action photo eg a horse rider or biker,,where the central figure is totally in focus and the bavkground is streaky to give an idea about the motion..i know its a commonly used technique.. What settings would those be ..thanks so much
    Andrew is totally correct... I may be able to add a bit to his post... Panning (following a moving subject with your lens) can, if a slower shutter speed is utilized, provide a sharp image of the subject with a "streaky" background.

    1. It is easier to do this when all the movement of the subject is in one direction. As an example, panning with a car or a motorcycle can give you a sharp image of the car and motorcycle but a blurred background. The car or motorcycle can be sharp because all of the motion of either subject is in one direction and following the subject with your camera can nulify the motion of the subject.

    2. However, things are different with a horse, a runner or a person on a bicycle because that type of subject is not only moving in a single direction, the legs are moving up and down and arms can be pumping. A pan with a slow shutter speed may get a sharp image of the person's or the horse's body but not the legs or arms. However, often a blur about the legs or arms gives the impression of motion...

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: Shutter speed

    Keeping in mind too that if you have a IS / VR lens then you need to switch it to panning mode (or off) for these types of shots.

  5. #5
    rpcrowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    13,306
    Real Name
    Richard

    Re: Shutter speed

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    Keeping in mind too that if you have a IS / VR lens then you need to switch it to panning mode (or off) for these types of shots.
    That is certainly true. When a lens has two modes (Canon designates them Mode 1 and Mode 2) you select Mode 2 which will allow you to move the camera along a horizontal plane without fighting to keep the lens still. It will however, correct for vertical movement.

    However, some older Canon IS systems only have a single mode and that is when you need to shut off the IS prior to panning or the IS will fight to keep the lens still.

    I don't know how this works with other than Canon stabilization in lenses or how in the in-body stabilization of cameras that have such stabilization works with panning.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: Shutter speed

    Quote Originally Posted by rpcrowe View Post
    However, some older Canon IS systems only have a single mode and that is when you need to shut off the IS prior to panning or the IS will fight to keep the lens still.
    Leaving it on can produce some cool accidental effects though

    Shutter speed

    Shutter speed

  7. #7
    dasmith232's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    40
    Real Name
    Dave Smith

    Re: Shutter speed

    ...shutter speed around 1/200 depending on what you're shooting...
    +1 on the part about "depending on what you're shooting. 1/200 would be good for motorsports (cars, motorcycles) in a racing situation. For human-powered things (bicycles, running, etc.) you'll definitely benefit from mode-2 technology, but also much slower shutter speeds. I've done several cycling events and depending on my distance to the riders and really, how I'm feeling that day, I use speeds as low as 1/60, but often around 1/125.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •