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Thread: Purchasing camera

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    Purchasing camera

    Hi I recently joined photography course and confused which camera I may purchase.Which camera is better cannon or nikon . My budget for purchasing camera is between 30,000 to 50,000 Indian currency. Please give me advice what to purchase.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Quote Originally Posted by poonam View Post
    Hi I recently joined photography course and confused which camera I may purchase.Which camera is better cannon or nikon . My budget for purchasing camera is between 30,000 to 50,000 Indian currency. Please give me advice what to purchase.
    Both Nikon and Canon are as good as each other, it's just a matter of personal preference. I started learning photography with a Canon point & shoot (SX120IS). So, when I wanted to upgrade to a DSLR, naturally I bought a Canon 550D as I was well accustomed to Canon system. The best deal for this camera in ebay india is
    around Rs. 29,000/- at the following link:
    http://www.ebay.in/itm/CANON-EOS-550...item20c9d31979

    So if you go for this, you will still be left with around Rs. 20,000/- (from your max budget of Rs. 50,000/-) which can be spent on getting some of the accessories like:

    1. a tripod and/or
    2. a speedlite and/or
    3. a prime lens, etc.

    You will also require a decent post processing software, I think GIMP is a free software which you can download from net.
    Other more experienced members will definitely give you some more valuable suggestions. Welcome to the fascinating world of photography, Poonam.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    You shoot cannon balls with a cannon and take pictures with a Canon camera
    I would suggest that either Adobe v.9 or v.10 or or Paint Shop Pro x4 is a better purchase and both are reasonably priced as your editing programme ...both have a tough learning curve but once you get the hang of what you can do with them you are unlikely to look further. I am biased because I have been using PSP for the past decade or so. A reasonably good free download is Paint.Net When I also had Adobe Photoshop I did an exercise with PN,PS and PSP and got similar results from each ...though I had to use fairly devious routes with PN So Elements or PSP is better if you can afford either.

    What accessories you NEED depends on what you want to do, I rarely use a tripod* or speed light and never a prime lens. I suggest when you get the camera and its kit lens you really learn to use it before thinking you need anything else.
    It is a fatal sickness to the person's pocket when they buy an inter-changable lens camera that they immediately think they need other [ and expensive] lenses etc.

    *Over the years I have acquired three or four tripods, more speed lights and three or so prime lenses for various cameras I have owned.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    I posted this quote earlier but, it bears repeating:

    "If you aren't getting extraordinary images from today's dSLRs, regardless of brand, it's not the camera!" - Bill Fortney, Nikon Corp.

    That is not to say that there are no differences between the various cameras in the market. I would venture to guess that there are more differences between the various level cameras within the same brand as there are between comparably priced cameras made by Nikon and Canon...

    I would also venture to say that the majority of differences across cameras are in the controls and the ergonomics of those cameras, rather than in the image quality achieved by the cameras...

    Another difference between cameras is the speed and accuracy of the auto-focus capability. This is quite important in shooting moving subject such as in sports and in capturing birds in flight and not so greatly important for other types of photography because most of today's DSLR cameras have adequate A/F capability...

    I also suggest that when purchasing a camera, you research the various components (flashes, lenses, etc.) that are availble for that camera because buying a camera is like marrying into a family. You are (except for divorce which is usually expensive - and switching brands which can also be expensive) stuck not only with the bride you have selected but with her entire family...
    Last edited by rpcrowe; 21st August 2012 at 02:11 AM.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    I've done a quick conversion as to the amount of money you have available to spend on a camera. 30000 - 50000 Indian Rupees works out to $US540 - $US900. I don't know what camera prices are like in India, but I would be able to get a new entry-level DSLR or even a step up from one of the major manufacturers like Canon or Nikon, plus a kit lens for that amount of money. I don't know the Canon line, but certainly the Nikon D3100 or even D5100 and the 18-55mm lens would work out for you.

    As for the course you are taking, you should perhaps ask there what they recommend. A number of courses I have taken assumed a DSLR rather than some of the other camera options out there.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Let me add something to my above statement. When you mentioned that you are beginning a Photography Course, I assumed that you would want a camera which into which you can grow. To me, this means a DSLR camera of whatever brand or level you can afford.

    If you buy a Canon camera. I am mentioning Canon because I know the brand pretty well and because ALL entry level DSLR Canon cameras can work with ALL Canon and all new Canon mount third party lenses (some older, used. Canon mount Sigma lenses can be chancy with newer Canon DSLR cameras).

    Nikon entry level cameras have a problem in that they all do not work with all Nikon lenses.

    This would sway me into the Canon camp, if I were not already in that camp. If an aspiring photographer buys an entry level Canon DSLR camera with a kit lens and wants to upgrade, he or she can make a major upgrade simply by purchasing better glass. All Canon autofocus glass (EF and EFS mounts) can work on all Canon 1.6x cameras from the very oldest and lowest entry level camera (such as the Canon 300D) to the newest and most expensive Canon DSLR cameras (such as the 60D and the 7D).

    In addition to buying new, you may a greater selection of used Canon glass available out there. I am making that assumption based on the above mentioned fact that all auto-focus Canon lenses will fit all 1.6x crop Canon DSLR cameras. As an example, I have and use two of the original Canon EF autofocus lenses (50mm f/1.8 Mki and 135mm f/2.8 Soft Focus) on all my DSLR cameras from the latest 7D back to one of the original Canon DSLR cameras the D60 (not 60D) which I have modified for full-time infra red photography.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    The fact that there are some F-mount lenses that will not autofocus on some of the entry level Nikon cameras should be of no concern to a new camera buyer unless they actually have a collection of such F-mount lenses that they are going to use on their purchase. There are over a hundred different lenses currently produced that work with all Nikon cameras. There are a few new and a larger number of old lenses that will not auto-focus on the low end Nikon cameras, but it is not a great mystery to determine what lenses will work fully on your camera -- and an awful lot of people use lenses that don't autofocus with their entry level Nikons without any problems (if the lens will autofocus on ANY Nikon digital camera, it will provide focus ranging visual feedback on the entry level cameras -- it's just that you need to provide the "motor" by turning your wrist. This limits these lenses to situations where you don't need continuous autofocus or rapid acquisition of focus.)

    I emphasize this because the lack of a focusing motor is the least interesting reason to avoid the entry level Nikons, but it is the one that tends to get emphasized. The real disadvantages of the entry level Nikons include: they have pentamirror viewfinders instead of pentaprism viewfinders, so they are noticeably less bright than the higher-end cameras; they do not include the built-in Commander mode for support of off-camera flash, so you need to buy separate control units if you want to explore that functionality; they lack two-wheel control, so you need to use the menu system more often than with the higher-level models; and they lack an LCD on the top of the camera if you have become used to looking there for the camera settings. There may be a few other things, depending upon the low-end model. For example, the D3x00 cameras lack exposure bracketing and can only be remotely fired with an IR trigger (personally, I like an actual cable but that may be just a quirk of mine). All of these things are potentially interesting features that you have to do without on the entry-level cameras. Needing a built-in motor on the lenses (which is always preferable if you have the option anyway) is pretty much of a yawn. Or so ISTM.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    With the limited funds you appear to be starting with it seems to me that the size of the family is irrelevant ... and to learn about photography to start with you need a camera with manual over-rides. It is only the unfortunate bias of the DSLR user that says you need one of them. The DSLR is required in the professional situation but not to learn. The bridge camera is quite capable of being a teaching instrument with some limitation to working in low light levels but M4/3 overcomes that but may cost the same or more as the entry level DSLR.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Quote Originally Posted by rpcrowe View Post
    Let me add something to my above statement. When you mentioned that you are beginning a Photography Course, I assumed that you would want a camera which into which you can grow. To me, this means a DSLR camera of whatever brand or level you can afford.

    If you buy a Canon camera. I am mentioning Canon because I know the brand pretty well and because ALL entry level DSLR Canon cameras can work with ALL Canon and all new Canon mount third party lenses (some older, used. Canon mount Sigma lenses can be chancy with newer Canon DSLR cameras).
    This is only true if you don't count all the Canon FD mount lenses that I believe were manufactured into the early 1990s. And of course there are a few Nikon F lenses that can't be used because of interference issues with the mirror, but excluding those few, you can use most Nikon lenses manufactured since 1959 on any F mount camera, albeit with manual focus.

    Regardless, any camera whether it be a Canon or Nikon (or Sony or Pentax, etc.) would fill the roll quite nicely. I try to be brand neutral with my responses because I believe that the photographer, not the camera makes the image.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Quote Originally Posted by GrumpyDiver View Post
    I try to be brand neutral with my responses because I believe that the photographer, not the camera makes the image.
    Well, that explains my problem...

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Quote Originally Posted by tclune View Post
    Well, that explains my problem...
    I don't think you are alone there....

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    It is often said that it is the photographer, not the camera, that makes the picture.

    The example often given is that a top-line photographer with a lower-line camera will always achieve better results than a less capable photographer with the best camera. I will totally agree with that premise but, there are times when better equipment is necessary to get the images that people need or want. One venue that is often remarked upon is indoor sports such as volleyball, basketball or gymnastics, especially at below the professional or collegiate level where the lighting in gymnasiums is often sub par. We read posts by parents who desire to shoot their kids in this type of venue using entry level cameras with kit lenses. Usually, the answer to that question is that more sophisticated equipment (faster lenses and cameras with higher ISO capabilities are needed).

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Hi every body,
    I am a new-comer into this truley valuble site as well as the realm of photography. I will be so thankfull if anybody could help me to choose the camera which best suits my needs in photography. the important factors in my choice are sensor size( I prefer full frame), speed, effective pixeles. I need a camera which is well adapted to low light atmospheres and fast moving objects. to narrow down the choices, I should say my favorite makes are canon and nikon. I will be appreciative of u to guid me to choose the best suited camera of my own. I

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Leyla View Post
    Hi every body,
    I am a new-comer into this truley valuble site as well as the realm of photography. I will be so thankfull if anybody could help me to choose the camera which best suits my needs in photography. the important factors in my choice are sensor size( I prefer full frame), speed, effective pixeles. I need a camera which is well adapted to low light atmospheres and fast moving objects. to narrow down the choices, I should say my favorite makes are canon and nikon. I will be appreciative of u to guid me to choose the best suited camera of my own. I
    Hi Leyla and welcome to CiC - both Canon and Nikon make cameras that meet your requirements. That is the good news, the bad new is that full-frame cameras are professional and semi-professional models and are extremely expensive. Current full frame camera bodies cost start at around $3000US and go up. Appropriate lenses are also quite expensive (the lenses I use run at around $2000 each). Effective pixels need to be aligned with what you are planning to do. If you are going to be printing very large photos, high pixel count is perhaps an important factor, but if you are planning to display on a computer or share on the internet, something more modest is going to be better.

    If you are not made of money, you might want to scale back your requirments and look at something more suited to your knowledge and skill level. I think a better place to start is to look at how much money you are willing to spend and start there. The camera you choose should match you skill level as well.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Leyla, to me, it somewhat doesnt really matter if your camera is a pro or not. as long as you have a DSLR, lens and skills, Your good to go. But if you really want to know what kind of camera you want, we need to know your budget. but your low light atmosphere and fast moving objects thing will need a lens with a high aperture. that way, you can gather light more and not worry about your high shutter speed.

    My suggestion if your looking for a pro camera is Nikon D7000 or Canon 60D.
    For a amateur-semipro camera is Nikon D3200/D5100 or Canon 1100D. i dont know how high the MP of the 1100D is, but im sure the d5100 has at least 15 or 16Mp. thanks for reading!!

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Hi poonam,
    Feel it, smell it, taste it and if you like it buy it. No matter what you buy if the individual behind the camera is good the shot will be good.
    Follow your own head and get whatever fits your budget.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Fstop Manalo View Post
    My suggestion if your looking for a pro camera is Nikon D7000 or Canon 60D.
    For a amateur-semipro camera is Nikon D3200/D5100 or Canon 1100D. i dont know how high the MP of the 1100D is, but im sure the d5100 has at least 15 or 16Mp. thanks for reading!!
    The D7000 and 60D are pro cameras? No, both are higher-end amateur cameras. The D5100 is a mid-range amateur camera and the D3200 and 1100D / Rebel T3 are entry level cameras. All of these cameras are crop frame, not full frame.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Dear Gabriel And Manfred,
    Thank u very much for the reply, In fact the budget which I've considered for the camera and the equipments is around 6000 to 8000 $ . moreover, even though I am not that much skilled in photography at the time being, but I suppose I'd better look down the road in order not to spend extra money later to replace my camera for a much suitable one. Anyway, I ll take ur offers and see if they are compatable with my needs. In addition, What's ur opinion about canon EOS 5D mark iii, canon EOS 1DMK IV, Canon 5D markii and nikon D3? May I have ur reviews over these types? And also what would u recommend me to get as the very firstly essential lenses and other equipments?

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    Administrator Manfred M's Avatar
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    Re: Purchasing camera

    Quote Originally Posted by Leyla View Post
    Dear Gabriel And Manfred,
    Thank u very much for the reply, In fact the budget which I've considered for the camera and the equipments is around 6000 to 8000 $ . moreover, even though I am not that much skilled in photography at the time being, but I suppose I'd better look down the road in order not to spend extra money later to replace my camera for a much suitable one. Anyway, I ll take ur offers and see if they are compatable with my needs. In addition, What's ur opinion about canon EOS 5D mark iii, canon EOS 1DMK IV, Canon 5D markii and nikon D3? May I have ur reviews over these types? And also what would u recommend me to get as the very firstly essential lenses and other equipments?
    It sounds like you are realistic in your budgeting. I shoot the full-frame Nikon D800 and the two lenses that I primarily use are the f/2.8 24-70mm and the f/2.8 70-200mm; so that basic equipment will set you back in the $7000 - $8000 range. Both of these lenses are quite fast. The Nikon D3 has been replaced by the D4, so the full-frame end Nikons are the D800 / D800E and the D4.

    Flashes (for low light work), filters, tripod a camera bag and a host of other equipment should be on your list. With digital photography, you should also look at investing in image editing software. Adobe Photoshop Elements is entry level software. I use Photoshop CS6 for much of what I do, but it is expensive and has a long learing curve, but is the "gold standard" for photo editing. Adobe Lightroom is another option, that I sometimes use.

    Much like you, I restricted myself to Canons and Nikons when I went into the DSLR line, and had a hard look at both lines. These companies have roughly equal market share, so you can't go wrong either way. I shot a number of models from both companies and ended up going with Nikon because the were more intuitive to use and fit my hands better than the Canons. I shot Canons last weekend; the first time in about 18 months and the things I didn't like when I first tested them still bother me, but I got great shots regardless.

    If you are just getting into photography, I do caution you that all of the cameras that you are looking at are complex and can be overwhelming. To a large extent (unless you are into some speciality work), the camera itself is far less important to the photo than the photographer. I have quite a few stunning shots taken with a cheap point & shoot camera and have been shooting an amateur DLSR for the past 3-1/2 years.

    Higher end digital cameras are running on a 3 or 4 year replacement cycle right now, for new models and both Canon and Nikon have just refreshed their lineup this year. The Canon 5D Mk III and Nikon D800 are competing for the same market and the Canon 1D Mk IV and Nikon D4 are the top end pro cameras for both companies. The Canon 5D Mk II is an older generation.

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    Re: Purchasing camera

    thank u sooo much for being so helpfull and taking the time and trouble to explain that much long and clearly. u really passed me great information.

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