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Thread: Masts of the Tall Ships

  1. #1

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    Masts of the Tall Ships

    Tall ships from around the world visited Baltimore, Maryland to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812.

    C&C always encouraged.



    Cuawhtemoc, a Mexican Navy training ship

    Masts of the Tall Ships



    Cisne Branco, a Brazilian Navy training ship

    Masts of the Tall Ships



    Dewaruci, an Indonesian Navy training ship (two images)

    Masts of the Tall Ships



    Masts of the Tall Ships
    Last edited by Mike Buckley; 19th June 2012 at 09:36 PM.

  2. #2
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: Masts of the Tall Ships

    I especially like #1.

    You couldn't pay me enough to climb to the top of a mast like this in heavy seas.

    However, in 32 years of Navy service, I never had to do anything like that!
    Last edited by rpcrowe; 19th June 2012 at 03:08 PM.

  3. #3

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    Re: Masts of the Tall Ships

    Richard: As my wife and I were walking around, she also wondered about the merits of training on a sailing ship.

  4. #4
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: Masts of the Tall Ships

    This is pretty well off the subject but, I also wonder if the time spent learning the intracies of handling sails could not be more effectively utilized in some other learning venue. Obviously, any naval training program is limited as to the time allocated. Even such a four year program such as our U.S. Naval Academy doesn't have unlimited training time.

    Cetainly, learning on a sailing ship will make good mariners out of the midshipmen. However, it seems to me that small sailing boats (like used at our Naval Academy) would provide basic seamanship training at a lower cost and in a more expedicious manner. And training on more modern vessels would be more appropriate to the modern era of naval warfare.

    When I attended Navy Boot Camp there was a lot of wasted training time. We learned how to wash our uniforms, nice but, any Navy ship at that time used laundries as a more water efficient way of washing clothing. I never washed a darn thing after boot camp. So why spend hours studing how to remove stains from uniforms and the best way to wash them? TRADITION...

    We also spent days on studying knots and ropework. However, except for ratings like Boatswain's Mate, most sailors never ventured further into knots and ropework than tying their shoelaces. Why spend so much time studying knots and ropework.. TRADITION, TRADITION...

    And yes, those sailing ships are nice to watch and can provide pride in those people viewing them. But, are they really worthwhile, I think not. Why are they used? TRADITION, TRADITION, TRADITION!

    Along the same lines, why not begin infantry training using muzzle loading firearms of the 18th and 19th Century Eras?

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