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Thread: A revisited HDR

  1. #1
    arith's Avatar
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    A revisited HDR

    From November 2009 and really difficult to do even now. It is a panorama of two frames each five HDR images.

    I was trying to get a sense of darkness even though with the HDR the effect really looked like daylight.

    New:
    Sequence: {nov00136_RT16.tif: TV=1.000000, AV=1.0, Bias=-2.0} {nov00137_RT16.tif: TV=1.000000, AV=1.0, Bias=-1.0} {nov00138_RT16.tif: TV=1.000000, AV=1.0, Bias=0.0} {nov00139_RT16.tif: TV=1.000000, AV=1.0, Bias=1.0} {nov00140_RT16.tif: TV=1.000000, AV=1.0, Bias=2.0}

    A revisited HDR

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    A revisited HDR

    I cannot find any proper exif beyond shot with Canon 10D.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________

    A little High Pass Filter; I can't remember how it is applied and so I applied it to an Overlay blend. Seems to work.

    A revisited HDR
    Last edited by arith; 21st May 2012 at 11:45 PM.

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    Re: A revisited HDR

    From my rather limited experiments with HDR, I have found that combining the shots is just the start of the process. The resulting merge then needs some conventional selective editing, with adjustment layers etc, before I end up with something that I really like.

    Are you trying to extract exif information from the merged image or from one of the original shots? I haven't checked it, but I assume it would be impossible to read that information from the finished image.

  3. #3
    arith's Avatar
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    Re: A revisited HDR

    No the exif has all gone Geoff. What I wanted to know is, is it better to combine the pairs and then do HDR or, as here carefully match the HDR's to be combined in a panorama.

    Does it need extra sharpening, it hasn't had any.

    Should it be brighter in the shadows, it can be like daylight but that is defeating the reason for the shoot.

    ect ect

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    Re: A revisited HDR

    I very much like the darker photo. Yes, I believe the image would benefit from sharpening. In this case, to emphasize the outlines, I would recommend High Pass Sharpening.

    Ina

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    Re: A revisited HDR

    First question Is it a panorama?
    These are normally letter box shape due to nature of what your are shooting, this seems a strange picture for a pano more of a square.

    2. HDR on a pano would be done with making the pano first, but of course all the data has gone as it is now one shot, so most HDR programs will allow you to tone map a single image, much the same way as doing "normal" HDR after you have blended the number of shots.

    The 2nd attempt is much more realistic and show better processing on your behalf, and yes it wouldn't hurt to sharpen it a little

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    Re: A revisited HDR

    Yes it is a pano Paul; I only had a 28mm lens then and I did HDR PP on the right, and using the same settings applied to the left using photoceptor then merged and blended the resulting two into the pano.

    But before that I applied DeNoise and Deconvolution and Detail sharpening to each of the 10 frames. But forgot that blending actually might cause the end result to look a bit softer and anyway a little sharpening will brighten it a little.

    Cheers Ina; I like the darker one and it is a skill to get it just right.

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    Re: A revisited HDR

    I would think, Steve, that the best way would certainly be to produce the merged HDR images first then stitch them together to create the finished image.

    I have a friend who produces mega panoramas (6 ft x 2 ft is small to him) and he often shoots with multiple focus points which are combined before stitching.

    When I have had a play with HDR I have always shot Raw and produced synchronised adjustments before merging. Getting the adjustments equal is always a risk with any panorama.

    With regard to sharpening. How about creating a duplicate layer, sharpening that then applying a mask so only the brightly lit windows are sharpened?

  8. #8
    arith's Avatar
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    Re: A revisited HDR

    Cheers Geoff, but I killed two birds with one stone. Sharpening did a spot of brightening, it always seems to. Hard to sharpen though and I had to blur some sky.

    Not easy is it; because the curtains are a bit noisy. Although it might not show on a print how exactly do you print, normally I have to brighten dark images a couple of notches 10/50.

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    Re: A revisited HDR

    Yes, my printer tends to be a little darker than my screen. As a check, I like to take some pixel values from pure white, or close to it; if there is any. If I get these to around 240 to 250 strength, it seems to print OK.

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