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Thread: first try macros

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    james

    first try macros

    Today I put my kenko tubes on my 200mm . Not a clue as to what I should do, I freehand shot these. Kinda guessing at my sett]ings. Sure would like some help. Thanks all. first try macros first try macros first try macrosfirst try macros

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Bobo

    Re: first try macros

    Pretty good for a first time. My first time with tubes was a disaster...

    Later on I started with these base settings and got reasonable results - f16, 1/125, diffused flash if needed but not pointed directly at the subject.

    One other thing you could try is using the short lens and going in close, the results can be pretty good too.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    South Devon, UK
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    Re: first try macros

    Just adding a little to Bobo's reply.

    A tripod is essential for good macros. Sometimes you get luck with a hand held shot if the shutter speed is OK but expect a lot of rejects.

    Using flash on virtually all shots will help to produce consistent results. I normally set up the camera with manual settings then adjust the flash output to suit. Needs a couple of test shots before getting serious each day, or if the light changes.

    My experiments using manual settings around 1/250, F14, Iso 200 suggest that adding a flash diffuser doesn't bring any advantages for average outdoor shots if flash exposure compensation is used correctly with the modern 'intelligent' flash units.

    Reducing the light by means of a diffuser just causes the flash unit to increase the flash strength in order to adjust for what it regards as reduced light conditions.

    It was different in the old days of fixed output flashes where manually reducing the output was essential.

    An aperture around F11 to F16 will give best depth of focus and, for outdoor shots, a shutter speed of 1/200 or a little faster will prevent blur problems caused by wind rock or subject movement. But don't go faster than your max flash exposure limit. Usually around 1/200 to 1/250, unless using high speed flash.

  4. #4
    WJT's Avatar
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    Jan 2012
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    Darwin, Australia
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    Wayne Turner

    Re: first try macros

    Hi James, there are some fantastic macro photographers on this site but I'm not one of them. However I have learnt a lot from posting my efforts on CiC. What I would suggest is to post the ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed to give those experienced macro photographers a bit more to go on. One thing I have learnt is that a flash can really sharpen up a shot and to use a small aperture setting (20 plus), which usually means a higher than normal ISO setting.

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