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Thread: Filter quality vs. price

  1. #1
    New Member Hooksie's Avatar
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    Jun 2009
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    Rhode Island, USA
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    Filter quality vs. price

    (Hi guys, first post.)

    After much research, I'm about to buy my first dSLR (Nikon D5000) and I've been exploring filters to get.

    I will be starting with the basic 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G lens that comes as the kit. I am interested in both a UV filter and Polarizing filter.

    Will there be (and for that matter, will I even notice) a degrade in photo quality if I go with the cheaper $20 filters from Tiffen/Hoya/B+W? If yes, how much should I expect to spend to not adversely affect quality?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Re: Filter Quality

    The quality of the filter on a kit lens wont be as important as the quality on a better lens...
    I wouldnt even worry about it until u get better/professional grade lenses....Then be pepared to spend alot on filters...

  3. #3
    Raycer's Avatar
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    May 2008
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    Calgary, Canada
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    Re: Filter Quality

    Buy a bigger filter than you need. And buy a step up ring or two. That'll save you from having to buy another filter later.

    for example
    get 52 to 72 and 72 to 77 step up rings.

    and get the 77mm polarizer, you can use it for 70-200 and 17-55 in the future.

  4. #4
    crisscross's Avatar
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    May 2008
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    Herefordshire UK
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    Chris

    Re: Filter Quality

    Don't they give you a 'skylight' filter lens protector with the kit lens? If not simple circular one OK.

    For polariser and later possibly other filters you would be better off with a 85mm square filter and holder; the step-up rings for each lens are quite cheap.

    If its your 1st DSLR, I wonder if you should actually get a bit of practice with it first and get filters much later after choosing your main lens(es) and finding the areas where you really need filters that cannot be simulated in PP. Unless you know from previous photo experience that you need polariser a lot for water, glass etc.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    New Zealand
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    Have a guess :)

    Re: Filter Quality

    My suggestion would be to invest in a multi-coated filter at a minimum. Welcome to the world of "the better it is, the more it costs"

    PS: Welcome to CiC too (at least we're still free!).

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