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Thread: Name that item

  1. #1
    ucci's Avatar
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    Name that item

    Okay. How is this for arrogance? Without permission of the Authorities who over see this site I have had the cheek, (would have said effrontery were I able to spell it and indeed knew what it meant) to post these items and throw it open to all who wish to have a go at guessing what they are. There will be no prizes offered to the smarties who guess right. Haven't worked out yet how to post the answers as yet for those who don't know but would like to. Have to think on that one. Of course all this assumes anyone will be interested. Maybe no one will be in the slightest bit interested. In which case the posting of answers will be a total irrelevancy!

    Cheers
    Old ucci

    Name that item

    Name that item

    Name that item

  2. #2
    jeeperman's Avatar
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    Re: Name that item

    I will have a go at #3.....

    They are called Codd bottles.
    Early soda bottle with a marble stopper. It held other liquids but mostly sodapop. it was injected with its contents and left to cure upside down to seat the marble stopper. When one bought it, they would the put pressure on the marble and force it to loosen and then rest in the middle of the neck where the formed glass channel kept the glass marble from falling to the bottom and breaking. clear and green marbles are the most common as the glass color was cheapest, although there were other colors.
    Last edited by jeeperman; 12th September 2011 at 02:11 PM.

  3. #3
    Steaphany's Avatar
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    Re: Name that item

    Antiques from a bush farm theme.

    The first one is a Butter Churn, put cream in the jar, screw on the churn, turn the crank and soon your have fresh butter. It is a bit over kill, I've made butter in a jar with a simple lid screwed on. Pour cream into a jar, screw on the lid, and give it a repeated shake. It will start out as slosh - slosh - slosh and be finished when it goes slosh - thunk - thunk, Yummm Butter !

    The second one looks like a Wool Shear to shear Sheep. It would connect to a mechanical power transfer flex cable that connects to a large motor or engine that would be too heavy to hold along with the shear head.

    I'm not familiar with the glass bottle as it specifically what it is for. I did catch seeing the Kangaroo on the bottle which is how I knew these all came from a bush farm or Sheep shearing station.

  4. #4
    FrankMi's Avatar
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    Re: Name that item

    That's easy! The first one is a Thingamagig, the second one is a Whatchamacallit, and the third one is glass bottle!
    Last edited by FrankMi; 12th September 2011 at 02:39 PM.

  5. #5
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Just add 'MacKenzie'

    Re: Name that item

    Aawh, it's all been answered before I got a chance to get to the thread!

  6. #6
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: Name that item

    Quote Originally Posted by Donald View Post
    Aawh, it's all been answered before I got a chance to get to the thread!
    Ditto,

    Too easy Ken!
    (assuming they're correct, they look/sound right)

    Try again with something harder!

  7. #7
    arith's Avatar
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    Re: Name that item

    butter maker; hair trimmer and an ornate bottle there is no prizes, the only time i get anything right, there is no prizes.

    Or if your pedantic, there isn't any prizes.

  8. #8
    ucci's Avatar
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    Re: Name that item

    Well. that didn't last long did it? So, we can close this thread. There are some very clever people out there! Just as a closing aside the Marble soft drink bottle shown which dates back to the early 1900's ... current valuation? Around $2000AUD. The shearer's hand pieces are a dime a dozen, just of historical interest. And no idea on the value of the English made glass butter churn.
    Thanks to all who got involved in a bit of fun. Bad luck Dave. Maybe next time you will be out of the starting blocks a little faster Okay, I am off to look for something more challenging.
    Cheers
    Old ucci

  9. #9
    Steaphany's Avatar
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    Re: Name that item

    You could post photos of trees and ask people to identify them.

    I know Victoria and Tasmania have 141 different Eucalyts alone, so that can be a bit more of a challenge.

  10. #10
    ucci's Avatar
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    Re: Name that item

    Quote Originally Posted by Steaphany View Post
    You could post photos of trees and ask people to identify them.

    I know Victoria and Tasmania have 141 different Eucalyts alone, so that can be a bit more of a challenge.
    Hi Steaphany
    Don't know your background on Eucayptus trees. But what I will say that it takes an expert to identify and discriminate between the various gum trees. Requires in depth study of the fruit, flowers, nuts, leaf shape and venation, crown shape, colour and type of bark. It is a very complex and difficult task which simply cannot be done from a single photograph. It is complicated further by the fact that there are more than 1000 identified gum species in Oz with more appearing all the time as people transplant them for various reasons. Gum trees are very adept at hybridizing into new species which often then go on to breed true. So new species keep cropping up. My wife and I have made a bit of a study of this as we are into natural dyeing of wool and silk and the leaves of the gum trees can produce a wide range of magnificent colours, with and without the use of mordants, for this purpose.
    On the surface yours is a good idea. But I reckon it would be too difficult.
    Cheers
    Ken

  11. #11
    Steaphany's Avatar
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    Re: Name that item

    Ken,

    Why do you think I followed my suggestion with the smiley ? Combine that with the fact that I knew how many species of Eucalypts are in just those two states should have been a clue that I knew a bit more on the subject than most. I also kept it vague since I doubt many out side of Australia realize the shear variety that the genus encompasses, from the 100m Mountain Ash to the mallees and shrubby species from harsh environments. ( A "How hard could that be" joke for those who presume Eucalypts are tropical and eaten by Koalas )

    I do have a personal interest in Eucalypts since I know the climate here in North Central Texas is much like that in parts of Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia. I also purchased and imported several species of Eucalypt seed from CSIRO and other sources including the Blue Gum and Mountain Ash and I also have the book "Eucalypts of Victoria and Tasmania" by Dean Nicole which I purchased from CSIRO's book site.

    When I purchased and moved to my ranch back in 1991, one characteristic that I noted, especially since the Texas stereotype has "Everything is bigger in Texas", is how small the trees are. The Live Oak, considered to be a big tree, only grows to 25m, the Mountain Cedar 10m, and Mesquite is mallee like at just 6 to 9m. There are areas with taller, such as the Piney Woods of South Eastern Texas were the Pines can range from 20 to 47m.

    My goal is to silvaculture a crop of Blue Gum on some of my acreage since they are a fast growing self replenishing timber. I'll also plant a variety of others about my property for ornamental, honey, and as a wind break plus I want to get some Mountain Ash growing just for the fun of having 100m tall trees.

    I'd love to give directions to my ranch by telling people to look for the place that looks like your in Australia
    Last edited by Steaphany; 13th September 2011 at 10:34 AM. Reason: alter formatting

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