Helpful Posts Helpful Posts:  0
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Hdr

  1. #1
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    29,246
    Real Name
    John

    Hdr

    Just wondering if this exposure has enough range for an HDR image. I didn't do any post processing yet, just downsized the jpeg copy.
    Hdr

  2. #2
    FrankMi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Fort Mill, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    6,294
    Real Name
    Frank Miller

    Re: Hdr

    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowman View Post
    Just wondering if this exposure has enough range for an HDR image. I didn't do any post processing yet, just downsized the jpeg copy.
    Hdr
    Hi John, if you open the original in Lightroom or Photoshop you could determine if the histogram showed blown shadows and/or highlights. Assuming it has both, then by definition this image has high dynamic range. If you determine that it is a candidate for HDR, how were you thinking of processing the image? For example, if it was shot in RAW, you may be able to recover some of the detail in the shadows and highlights.

    Seeing the contrast range in the composition, this is an image for which I would have taken three shots on a tripod; one at normal exposure, one at plus 2 EV and one at minus 2 EV so that I could do HDR Tonemapping with the images. If you only have one image at normal exposure, there still may be some recovery that is possible using single shot HDR techniques. Usually you will want to determine how you intend to shoot and process HDR images before you press the shutter. Hope this helps!

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,342
    Real Name
    Steve

    Re: Hdr

    Nice shot john, there is no need for a hdr. The shadow detail is just fine, and the highlights can easily be recovered. IMO , save the hdr for the shots that need it.

  4. #4
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    29,246
    Real Name
    John

    Re: Hdr

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankMi View Post
    Hi John, if you open the original in Lightroom or Photoshop you could determine if the histogram showed blown shadows and/or highlights. Assuming it has both, then by definition this image has high dynamic range. If you determine that it is a candidate for HDR, how were you thinking of processing the image? For example, if it was shot in RAW, you may be able to recover some of the detail in the shadows and highlights.

    Seeing the contrast range in the composition, this is an image for which I would have taken three shots on a tripod; one at normal exposure, one at plus 2 EV and one at minus 2 EV so that I could do HDR Tonemapping with the images. If you only have one image at normal exposure, there still may be some recovery that is possible using single shot HDR techniques. Usually you will want to determine how you intend to shoot and process HDR images before you press the shutter. Hope this helps!
    Hi Frank,

    The photo was taken in RAW format, I did not bracket the shot as the D60 doesn't have this function. I checked for blown highlights and there were only a few small areas in the columns which could be quickly fixed with PSE8. Also this was handheld, I only had the 70-300mm lens with me and couldn't compose it any better with traffic directly behind me. I know that true HDR requires bracketed shots and that is how I would usually do this, but I happened to be standing in front of this building about 7:00PM, it was directly behind me and I thought that the range of tones would be suitable for HDR. Traffic is so heavy at this time of day that unless I could find the perfect elevation I would get nothing but intrusive automobiles in the shot and by the time traffic slowed the light source would have changed.

    Thanks for the suggestions and comments.

  5. #5
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    29,246
    Real Name
    John

    Re: Hdr

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve S View Post
    Nice shot john, there is no need for a hdr. The shadow detail is just fine, and the highlights can easily be recovered. IMO , save the hdr for the shots that need it.
    Thanks Steve,

    I don't really go for the extravagent HDR conversions when I do try the method, but always on the lookout for a scene that would benefit from it. If and when I do find that perfect shot I hope the HDR is so subtle that no one could recognize it.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucharest,Romania
    Posts
    1,323

    Re: Hdr

    Hi,
    Raw offers the possibility to "dig" in deep shadows and to "cover" highlights,enough as You could see below.But a good hdr(around 5 shots) helps more.

    Hdr

  7. #7
    Seriche's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Bailiwick of Guernsey
    Posts
    347
    Real Name
    Seri

    Re: Hdr

    John,

    I'm siding with Steve on this one. I like it better as it is. Those lovely reds and mauves are really attractive, and the textures are beautiful as they are. Personal taste, as always, when talking about HDR...

    You said that you'd only want to do a subtle bit of HDR. What is it that you think is lacking in the original?

    Seri (Ducking )

  8. #8
    FrankMi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Fort Mill, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    6,294
    Real Name
    Frank Miller

    Re: Hdr

    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowman View Post
    Hi Frank,

    The photo was taken in RAW format, I did not bracket the shot as the D60 doesn't have this function. I checked for blown highlights and there were only a few small areas in the columns which could be quickly fixed with PSE8. Also this was handheld, I only had the 70-300mm lens with me and couldn't compose it any better with traffic directly behind me. I know that true HDR requires bracketed shots and that is how I would usually do this, but I happened to be standing in front of this building about 7:00PM, it was directly behind me and I thought that the range of tones would be suitable for HDR. Traffic is so heavy at this time of day that unless I could find the perfect elevation I would get nothing but intrusive automobiles in the shot and by the time traffic slowed the light source would have changed.

    Thanks for the suggestions and comments.
    Hi John, I am continuously experimenting and still have a LOT to learn but I believe it comes down to personal taste and the tools and techniques you use to achieve your goals. You can apply any technique to any image to achieve a particular goal. There are no rules that dictate what you must do or how you must do it. I usually prefer to reproduce an image that is as close as possible to what I saw when I took the shot, but for fun, I sometimes break my own rule!

    I like to work with high contrast images so I tend to use certain techniques more often. For example, I have used Tonemapping on a single contrasty image to get a certain look. Why didn't I shoot three or more images on a tripod? Simple. The subject was moving! I have also taken three different exposure hand-held images of the same contrasty object and used Tonemapping with alignment to merge them together. Why? Because I didn't have (or couldn't use) a tripod at the time I took the shot. I have taken a single RAW and produced three or more copies at different exposures and then used layers to manually merge the highlights and shadows back into the original. Why? Because I can achieve a sharper image with less noise, particularly in the shadows. Not all of the images I used these techniques on would be considered 'HDR' by a purest because the images may have had some detail in the shadows and highlights.

    By the way, my D3100 doesn't do Auto-Bracketing either. I just push the shutter three or more times, changing the EV between each shot.

    Listen to your heart, experiment, explore, and have fun!

    OK guys. I have my flack suit on, fire away!

  9. #9
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    29,246
    Real Name
    John

    Re: Hdr

    Quote Originally Posted by Seriche View Post
    John,

    I'm siding with Steve on this one. I like it better as it is. Those lovely reds and mauves are really attractive, and the textures are beautiful as they are. Personal taste, as always, when talking about HDR...

    You said that you'd only want to do a subtle bit of HDR. What is it that you think is lacking in the original?

    Seri (Ducking )
    Seri,

    Looking for anything that will give a 3D effect.

  10. #10
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    29,246
    Real Name
    John

    Re: Hdr

    Quote Originally Posted by Radu Dinu Cordeanu View Post
    Hi,
    Raw offers the possibility to "dig" in deep shadows and to "cover" highlights,enough as You could see below.But a good hdr(around 5 shots) helps more.

    Hdr
    Radu,

    I have a bridge and a 4/3s that will only do +/-1 EV and the Nikon can be done manually +/- 5 EV. The 4/3s will also do WB, FL, and ISO bracketing but that would be too strange. I haven't tried it yet but imagine blending WB images.

  11. #11
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    29,246
    Real Name
    John

    Re: Hdr

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankMi View Post
    Hi John, I am continuously experimenting and still have a LOT to learn but I believe it comes down to personal taste and the tools and techniques you use to achieve your goals. You can apply any technique to any image to achieve a particular goal. There are no rules that dictate what you must do or how you must do it. I usually prefer to reproduce an image that is as close as possible to what I saw when I took the shot, but for fun, I sometimes break my own rule!

    I like to work with high contrast images so I tend to use certain techniques more often. For example, I have used Tonemapping on a single contrasty image to get a certain look. Why didn't I shoot three or more images on a tripod? Simple. The subject was moving! I have also taken three different exposure hand-held images of the same contrasty object and used Tonemapping with alignment to merge them together. Why? Because I didn't have (or couldn't use) a tripod at the time I took the shot. I have taken a single RAW and produced three or more copies at different exposures and then used layers to manually merge the highlights and shadows back into the original. Why? Because I can achieve a sharper image with less noise, particularly in the shadows. Not all of the images I used these techniques on would be considered 'HDR' by a purest because the images may have had some detail in the shadows and highlights.

    By the way, my D3100 doesn't do Auto-Bracketing either. I just push the shutter three or more times, changing the EV between each shot.

    Listen to your heart, experiment, explore, and have fun!

    OK guys. I have my flack suit on, fire away!
    Frank,

    I have bracketed a few images manually and as I said I usually apply HDR subtly so no extravagent images yet. I'd like to do one or two and take it to the extreme, but if I can achieve the same in camera that would be even better.

  12. #12
    FrankMi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Fort Mill, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    6,294
    Real Name
    Frank Miller

    Re: Hdr

    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowman View Post
    Frank,

    I have bracketed a few images manually and as I said I usually apply HDR subtly so no extravagent images yet. I'd like to do one or two and take it to the extreme, but if I can achieve the same in camera that would be even better.
    Hi John, I don't apply HDR techniques to every image and I'm not fond of 'overcooked' HDR images. For example, owing to the extreme dynamic range of the shot below, I couldn't have gotton the view outside the window, in the glass cabinet or the dark Dining Room without multiple exposures and HDR techniques. Fortunately being indoors, I could have complete control over the environment as I was learning. This is one of the first HDR images I took when I graduated to a DSLR from my Point 'n Shoot in February.

    Hdr

    When I compare the image to the actual kitchen, the colors and patterns are very close to the original, which was my goal. The HDR process was anything but subtle (more like brute force), but the result is nothing like I could have gotton with conventional photographic techniques. This is what I started with...

    Hdr
    Last edited by FrankMi; 19th July 2011 at 11:48 PM.

  13. #13
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    29,246
    Real Name
    John

    Re: Hdr

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankMi View Post
    Hi John, I don't apply HDR techniques to every image and I'm not fond of 'overcooked' HDR images. For example, owing to the extreme dynamic range of the shot below, I couldn't have gotton the view outside the window, in the glass cabinet or the dark Dining Room without multiple exposures and HDR techniques. Fortunately being indoors, I could have complete control over the environment as I was learning. This is one of the first HDR images I took when I graduated to a DSLR from my Point 'n Shoot in February.

    Hdr

    When I compare the image to the actual kitchen, the colors and patterns are very close to the original, which was my goal. The HDR process was anything but subtle (more like brute force), but the result is nothing like I could have gotton with conventional photographic techniques. This is what I started with...

    Hdr
    I like both, the original has a more realistic tone to it but I also like what HDR did to the glass, ceramics, and metals. Also, as you said, it did bring out the detail of the other room and exterior.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •