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Thread: Query : Acceptable ISO

  1. #1

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    Kaushik

    Query : Acceptable ISO

    Hello Forum,

    Any one got idea on how much max ISO value can be set in Samsung NX11 to get 6X4 print photographs without grainy or any visible patch

  2. #2

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    Urban Domeij

    Re: Query : Acceptable ISO

    Your question is a bit akin to the one about the length of a string. We all have different ideas of how much noise or other visual effects unrelated to the scene that we might accept.

    What happens visually when you increase ISO is twofold. Noise increases and dynamic range decreases. So beyond being a simple question, the answer not only depends on preferences, but also on the content of the photograph, its dynamic range, what tonality would be preferred and the number of fine detail that should be preserved.

    So to make a guess, considering phase of the moon and how the wind blows, I would guess that there is no visible difference in a six by four print up to ISO 800, while at higher settings you would notice degradation when you scrutinise the image. But some image content might not suffer, while other image content might be ruined by image noise.

    As you have the camera, the best way to find out is to try it out.

  3. #3

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    Re: Query : Acceptable ISO

    ISO not only varies by camera model, but also is unique to each individual camera. Each camera of a specific model will be close, but not the same. Testing your specific camera is the only way to know what it can do acceptably.

  4. #4
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: Query : Acceptable ISO

    Quote Originally Posted by DTruex View Post
    ISO not only varies by camera model, but also is unique to each individual camera. Each camera of a specific model will be close, but not the same. Testing your specific camera is the only way to know what it can do acceptably.
    It is also related to the aperture you use and to an extent the shutter speed. If you are using a tripod then you have eliminated some of the concern regarding an in focus image related to camera shake. This really calls for an experiment by you and you will need to record your camera settings until you get an image that is to your liking, but even then it will only relate to the lighting conditions in which you were currently photographing.

  5. #5
    Hansm's Avatar
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    Re: Query : Acceptable ISO

    To get the maximum out of a camera, correct exposure is very important.
    Underexposure will create much more noise then correct exposure.
    If the image has a lot of darker areas it's better to adjust the exposure on these areas.
    If possible use a tripod and make several exposures and after that match them together during PP.

  6. #6
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: Query : Acceptable ISO

    Noise is also increased with underexposure. However many post processing programs will reduce the impact of noise. I personally would rather have a noisy image that doesn't suffer from camera shake than an image that is noise free and is blurry from camera movement.

  7. #7
    Peter Ryan's Avatar
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    Re: Query : Acceptable ISO

    Noise will also depend upon your post processing. Sharpening an image will also sharpen the noise and amplify it in the final print. Judicious sharpening can help reduce keep noise to a minimum and render a good quality image.

    Noise is also less noticeable in print that on the screen so trying to evaluate it on screen will not show what will happen in print.

  8. #8

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    Have a guess :)

    Re: Query : Acceptable ISO

    It's always a compromise. If you keep ISO low to minimise noise then you'll either have to slow down the shutterspeed (and risk camera shake and/or subject motion) or open the aperture, and risk insufficient depth of field. As a rule, high-ISO noise is far less damaging to an image than either of the other two - so put another way, use as high an ISO setting as you need to to minimise the risk of damage from the other two.

    Additionally, people worry about ISO noise far too much - often it's visible at 100% magnification on a monitor, but undetectable on an actual print - especially a small one. The key to low noise photos are (a) don't crop the shot excessively, (b) don't under-expose the shot. It's better to use a high ISO and correctly expose then it is to use a low ISO - under-expose - and then correct in post-processing.

    Hope this helps

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