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Thread: Shots from Natchez, MS

  1. #1
    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Shots from Natchez, MS

    I visited family last week to attend my niece's HS graduation, and had a chance to go to nearby Natchez, MS. The Mississippi River was at an all-time record level, so of course I took my camera. C&C is invited and appreciated.

    #1 The Casino: By law, all casinos in the state are required to float... literally, on water.
    Shots from Natchez, MS

    #2 The Saloon Under-the-Hill: Under-the-Hill is the oldest, historic part of town, and the location of Jim Bowie's famous knife fight. The saloon was open, but the toilets were closed because high water had flooded the sewers.
    Shots from Natchez, MS

    #3 Old Man River: This is an all-time record level for N. America's largest river.
    Shots from Natchez, MS

    #4 The Flood: This was taken Under the Hill.
    Shots from Natchez, MS

  2. #2
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Shots from Natchez, MS

    #2 is the pick of this set for me. lovely tight composition with the chair, the doors and the brick wall each being equally important and strong elements of the image. Lots and lots of atmosphere. A really good one, Al.

    In the first one, I'd want to get rid of that water tower. It really drags attention away from the boat.

    The one (of the river) is obviously a record to make of a historic event and for that reason needs to be kept. But it is not, you'll agree, a pwerful artistic image. But I don't think it's meant to be.

    #4 is a bit overcooked on the pp for my personal taste. But, again, an important historic record showing water levels at their all-time high.

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    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Re: Shots from Natchez, MS

    Thanks, Donald, your comments are right on the money, as usual.

    #2 is my favorite of this group, as well, but I keep thinking I should burn the doorknob a bit. I wish I had taken some close-ups of the saloon doors, the texture and detail of the wood are just incredible in the full size image. I love the way the top of the door opens, as can be seen on door on the right.

    Photo #4 is the problem child here because of the light on the water. I tried Jiro's contrast technique to try to pull out more detail in the water, but I just don't have the hang of this technque yet. More practice required.

  4. #4
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: Shots from Natchez, MS

    I love Natchez because of its history. The Mississippi is truly "Father of Waters" which I believe its name derived from...

    When I visited that city last year, I learned that the "Natchez-Under-The-Hill" of today is not exactly the same area as the historic and notorious "Natchez-Under-The-Hill" of the 19th Century. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers did flood control construction which changed the Mississippi flow a bit.

    http://rpcrowe.smugmug.com/Travel/Na...77527103_wZvsm

  5. #5
    rwfarnell's Avatar
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    Re: Shots from Natchez, MS

    I love #2
    Thanks for sharing

  6. #6
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    Re: Shots from Natchez, MS

    Quote Originally Posted by rpcrowe View Post
    I love Natchez because of its history. The Mississippi is truly "Father of Waters" which I believe its name derived from...

    When I visited that city last year, I learned that the "Natchez-Under-The-Hill" of today is not exactly the same area as the historic and notorious "Natchez-Under-The-Hill" of the 19th Century. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers did flood control construction which changed the Mississippi flow a bit.

    http://rpcrowe.smugmug.com/Travel/Na...77527103_wZvsm
    Thanks for the link to your photos, Richard. I was born in Natchez, and although we moved about 60 miles east when I was a young child, I visited the city often when I was growing up. I remember touring through Rosalie when I was in high school, and being invited to play the piano shown in your photo of the music room. Talk about intimidated... I certainly never expected to be asked for an inpromptu recital on an antique instrument that seemed a priceless museum piece! Later, we went outside and my friend rang that ship's bell... absolutely ear-splitting!!!

    I'll post some images later of the ruins of Windsor mansion (located a bit north of Natchez, near Port Gibson).

  7. #7
    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Re: Shots from Natchez, MS

    Quote Originally Posted by rwfarnell View Post
    I love #2
    Thanks for sharing
    Thanks, Rob.

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    Re: Shots from Natchez, MS

    Could I vote for number #2? My kind of image which I felt was very well done. Maybe I would have liked to have seen the top of the door. But I accept that this may not have been possible.

  9. #9
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    Re: Shots from Natchez, MS

    Quote Originally Posted by ucci View Post
    Could I vote for number #2? My kind of image which I felt was very well done. Maybe I would have liked to have seen the top of the door. But I accept that this may not have been possible.
    Your vote is gratefully accepted, Ken. I wanted the top of the door in the shot, too, but there was an awning over the sidewalk, and some modern commercial logos that were inconsistent with the context. These doors are quite tall and narrow; doors of modern dimensions would have fit into the frame comfortably. As I said earlier, I wish I had taken some close-ups of these doors; given the texture and tone, they would be interesting photographic subjects in their own right.

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