Helpful Posts Helpful Posts:  0
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Living with Nature

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Living with Nature

    Final shot from the series tonight ... hope you all enjoy!

    Living with Nature

  2. #2
    Nicola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Toscana, Italy
    Posts
    993

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    Final shot from the series tonight ... hope you all enjoy!

    Living with Nature
    Yes! I really enjoy!
    good work and nice silhouette

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicola View Post
    Yes! I really enjoy!
    good work and nice silhouette
    Thanks Nicola

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA USA
    Posts
    1,382
    Real Name
    Mary... or Lucy... either is fine with me. ;)

    Re: Living with Nature

    Yes. I did enjoy. I love the sunbeams streaking through the clouds. Beautiful, Colin.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by ilovelucydog View Post
    Yes. I did enjoy. I love the sunbeams streaking through the clouds. Beautiful, Colin.
    Thanks Mary,

    I'd hoped to capture a wide-angle colourful setting sun behind it, but the sun wouldn't "play the game" tonight, and the stack was too high to use a longer lens for a narrower view

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA USA
    Posts
    1,382
    Real Name
    Mary... or Lucy... either is fine with me. ;)

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    Thanks Mary,

    I'd hoped to capture a wide-angle colourful setting sun behind it, but the sun wouldn't "play the game" tonight, and the stack was too high to use a longer lens for a narrower view
    I think it's perfect. It looks so peaceful and warm.

  7. #7
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Glenfarg, Scotland
    Posts
    19,982
    Real Name
    Just add 'MacKenzie'

    Re: Living with Nature

    You've retained, in my view, just the right amount of detail in the 'tepee' and surrounding ground. And, again, what a amazing sky. And for all of us who speak constantly about learning and growing our knowledge and experience, this is a perfect example, I think, of the experienced photographer in action - who knows what will be achieved by using the right lens for the occasion and then executing it so well.

  8. #8
    Nicola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Toscana, Italy
    Posts
    993

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    Thanks Mary,

    I'd hoped to capture a wide-angle colourful setting sun behind it, but the sun wouldn't "play the game" tonight, and the stack was too high to use a longer lens for a narrower view
    Colin
    what focal lenght for this picture did you use?
    thanks
    N


    ---- ok ... found in exif. 16mm
    thanks anyway!
    Last edited by Nicola; 30th April 2011 at 11:51 AM.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by Donald View Post
    You've retained, in my view, just the right amount of detail in the 'tepee' and surrounding ground. And, again, what a amazing sky. And for all of us who speak constantly about learning and growing our knowledge and experience, this is a perfect example, I think, of the experienced photographer in action - who knows what will be achieved by using the right lens for the occasion and then executing it so well.
    Thanks Donald,

    I'll take you on a quick journey ...

    When I was flying light twin-engine aeroplanes, one of the things we "enjoyed" practicing regularly was engine failure drills (as you can imagine, in a twin engine plane, it creates one hell of an asymetric thrust issue). So it goes something like this ... (if climbing) ...

    Counter the yaw with opposite rudder - lower the nose to obtain blue-line speed - mixtures fully rich - pitch full fine - throttles wide open - check/retract flaps - check/retract undercarriage - identify the failed engine - verify the failed engine (by retarding the throttle) - feather the prop on the failed engine - cowl flaps (open working engine, closed failed engine) - trim. On a good day the instructor would fail an engine at about 300 feet after takeoff - again on the downwind leg of a circuit - and again turning finals to land. As you can imagine, it's about the busiest 4 minutes of a pilots life - never a second to spare - always something to check / recheck / do ...

    ... and the funniest thing is -- I'm thinking about as hard on a typical shoot. Not quite "life and death" stuff, but I'm always looking for where elements are falling in the composition - trying to think of a way to make it better - thinking about shutterspeeds / aperture & depth of field / ISO / Exposure - and what combinations will be needed for what effects I'd like (or think may "work) - what else is happening in the environment (is there a boat approaching - is this something I can use to my advantage - or do I need to compensate for it in some other way. Etc. etc etc, all whilst the light is changing (as it does - quickly - with sunrise/sunset shots).

    So for me it comes down to thinking on my feet - using the experience I have - doing the best job I can - and leaving the rest up to mother nature. Sometimes it works, and works well, other times it "just doesn't fly" - but at least I get an education on what doesn't work.

    In the case of this shot, at the time I knew I wanted the branches leading out of the frame at bottom right - I knew I wanted the overall shape of the stack to be "fairly meaningful" in the composition. I would have preferred a wider field of view (well more background, less stack horizontally), but there were other factors that came into play preventing me from doing much about it (stack too high, drop off behind me). I knew I wanted the sun behind the stack - and I knew a wide-angle lens could give me some nice clouds. So that was the plan ... which turned to custard when the sky just didn't colour up. So this shot was taken just before sunset (not when I'd normally shoot), and the other one ("where there is there's light, there is hope" shot was actually taken with a much longer lens to cover the part of the sky that did colour up. So a bit of a "plan B / save" at the last minute.

    PS: I was also thinking about the "just the right about of shadow detail" -- to the point where I had a could of 580EX II's firing into an umbrella; don't think I actually used it on this shot, but I did for others. It's the type of shot where I can't use a GND - so I was relying on the fill light slider / dodge tool, with the speedlites as a "backup"
    Last edited by Colin Southern; 30th April 2011 at 01:09 PM.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA USA
    Posts
    1,382
    Real Name
    Mary... or Lucy... either is fine with me. ;)

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    Thanks Donald,

    I'll take you on a quick journey ...

    When I was flying light twin-engine aeroplanes, one of the things we "enjoyed" practicing regularly was engine failure drills (as you can imagine, in a twin engine plane, it creates one hell of an asymetric thrust issue). So it goes something like this ... (if climbing) ...

    Counter the yaw with opposite rudder - lower the nose to obtain blue-line speed - mixtures fully rich - pitch full fine - throttles wide open - check/retract flaps - check/retract undercarriage - identify the failed engine - verify the failed engine (by retarding the throttle) - feather the prop on the failed engine - cowl flaps (open working engine, closed failed engine) - trim. On a good day the instructor would fail an engine at about 300 feet after takeoff - again on the downwind leg of a circuit - and again turning finals to land. As you can imagine, it's about the busiest 4 minutes of a pilots life - never a second to spare - always something to check / recheck / do ...

    ... and the funniest thing is -- I'm thinking about as hard on a typical shoot. Not quite "life and death" stuff, but I'm always looking for where elements are falling in the composition - trying to think of a way to make it better - thinking about shutterspeeds / aperture & depth of field / ISO / Exposure - and what combinations will be needed for what effects I'd like (or think may "work) - what else is happening in the environment (is there a boat approaching - is this something I can use to my advantage - or do I need to compensate for it in some other way. Etc. etc etc, all whilst the light is changing (as it does - quickly - with sunrise/sunset shots).

    So for me it comes down to thinking on my feet - using the experience I have - doing the best job I can - and leaving the rest up to mother nature. Sometimes it works, and works well, other times it "just doesn't fly" - but at least I get an education on what doesn't work.

    In the case of this shot, at the time I knew I wanted the branches leading out of the frame at bottom right - I knew I wanted the overall shape of the stack to be "fairly meaningful" in the composition. I would have preferred a wider field of view (well more background, less stack horizontally), but there were other factors that came into play preventing me from doing much about it (stack too high, drop off behind me). I knew I wanted the sun behind the stack - and I knew a wide-angle lens could give me some nice clouds. So that was the plan ... which turned to custard when the sky just didn't colour up. So this shot was taken just before sunset (not when I'd normally shoot), and the other one ("where there is there's light, there is hope" shot was actually taken with a much longer lens to cover the part of the sky that did colour up. So a bit of a "plan B / save" at the last minute.

    PS: I was also thinking about the "just the right about of shadow detail" -- to the point where I had a could of 580EX II's firing into an umbrella; don't think I actually used it on this shot, but I did for others. It's the type of shot where I can't use a GND - so I was relying on the fill light slider / dodge tool, with the speedlites as a "backup"
    So... when I'm like 95 I'll think of all these factors?

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by ilovelucydog View Post
    So... when I'm like 95 I'll think of all these factors?
    All I know is that the more I think about it, the more I think that flying was easier ...

    ... and cheaper!

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA USA
    Posts
    1,382
    Real Name
    Mary... or Lucy... either is fine with me. ;)

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    All I know is that the more I think about it, the more I think that flying was easier ...

    ... and cheaper!
    I really should stick to baking cookies.

  13. #13
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Glenfarg, Scotland
    Posts
    19,982
    Real Name
    Just add 'MacKenzie'

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by ilovelucydog View Post
    I really should stick to baking cookies.
    No.

    It's about acknowledging that you know an awful lot more than you did when you started out and that you are on a journey of discovery and learning.

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: Living with Nature

    Quote Originally Posted by ilovelucydog View Post
    I really should stick to baking cookies.
    Cookies - yumm (I wish they weren't). Thank goodness I don't bake them (the terms "small window-less buildings" comes to mind!).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •