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Thread: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

  1. #1
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    The bit of branch in the bottom left is the same one as here.

    There were amazing patterns in the sky all day yesterday, this sort-of stripe effect. Wish I understood clouds and weather better than I do.

    Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire
    40D, 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM @ 28mm. ISO 100. 1/10 @ f22. Manual 12:43pm
    Last edited by Donald; 24th January 2011 at 10:21 AM.

  2. #2

    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    I looked at this one 15 minutes ago and I'm still thinking. Of course, it's lovely but, after the other one, it doesn't seem to have that transcendent, ethereal quality that the other one had. Also, I can't quite put my finger on it, but, I really like those amazing branches and wish that the story was more about them, maybe. Maybe, they're competing with the view beyond or something like that and I wish that it was more about them or more about the hills. Sorry, Donald, I can't quite work it out. (or maybe more about the sky and the branches - see! I really can't figure it out.)

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    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    Thanks Katy. I can see where you're coming from here. Maybe there are too many 'bits' in it.

    I was aware of the pattern in the sky effectively having an edge. So I hung about until it had moved over and was at the edge of where the branches were. The sky was the main driver for the picture.

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    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    The "stripes" in the clouds is a wave, caused by layers of air moving in different directions. Think of water in a stream flowing over a stone... it's sort of the same thing, but here the surface of the water is replaced by the "surface" between air layers. The lower layer of air flows over a mountain range (instead of a stone in the stream), and a wave is formed downstream. This is fairly common in mountainous areas, and can sometimes be seen even when there are no clouds. Look for this when a weather front is approaching, especially a cold front. If the clouds are thin, you can sometimes see a line of clouds at the peak of each wave.

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    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    Thanks Al. Fascinating stuff.

    It's not something I've seen around here often and we are in a fairly hilly area. It just must have been the coming together of all the various factors that result in this happening. It certainly was quite awe-inspiring.

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    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    I'm not familiar with European weather patterns, but it's quite common in the US desert SW. I still remember a wave I saw in the desert at sunset over 20 years ago. There were no clouds at all, but the sunset turned the air layers different colors, making a beautiful wave of color across the entire sky. I wish I'd had a camera back then... it was incredible!

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    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    I didn't read the note you put at the top until a second look but immediately looked at that branch and thought aloud it was the same one...funny, our observational skills.

    As per the cloud patterns, watch your weather reports for converging warm and cold fronts...or in your case, a colder layer coming atop an existing cold layer. It is this same layering effect that creates tornadoes in the midwest, though with cold and warm fronts converging.

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    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    Hi Donald,

    I think I'm in agreement with Katy on this. I feel constrained when I look at the photo. I want you to zoom in or zoom out and I feel like I'm working a bit too much to find the subject. I wanted to comment on this because it's a feeling I get often when I try to shoot landscapes. I know what I what the composition to be, but I can't get into a position that will allow it. It frustrates the hell out of me. One solution for this shot as composed might be to clone out all the grass in the foreground, leaving the log and the tree as counterpoints.

    By the way, the other shot is beautiful.

    Steve

  9. #9

    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    Donald, this one lacks your usual simple and bold compositional elements. The eye does not naturally rest anywhere and the composition is not strong enough to be without a main element of interest. Looks like you may have been having a brushed steel and red apple day.....except the other image you posted is a real treat.

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    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    You're right folks. This is an example of pushing something too far just because the idea you had seemed a good one and you don't want to let it go.

    Lesson - Even when you feel you're reasonably experienced you can still make the mistake of not knowing when to pull the plug and dump it.

    Already took it off my website.

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    Re: Loch of Craiglush, Perthshire

    Donald

    Sorry to hear you dumped it. I guess I'm alone in my view of this but I think the branches give more depth to the photo. I feel like I'm standing on a little knoll just back from the tree and looking across to the distant hills.....and the clouds add an additional element. I guess the old saying is right...beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

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