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Thread: Free photography tips

  1. #1

    Free photography tips

    Peter Ryan said...

    Free photography tips
    When you take a shot like this and know you will need to correct for linear perspective later on you need to allow at least 15% more room all around for the correction.
    And Janis, who's image he was commenting on, said...

    Quote Originally Posted by purplehaze View Post
    I hate when I do that too. Thanks for the tip about the 15% margin, Peter. We should compile a list of photography's magic numbers and put that one in it.
    What a good idea! So here it is.

    SOME GUIDELINES

    1. One tip per post, but you may add as many as you like.
    2. Please change the title (advanced edit) and give the tip a short simple keyword-strong title. Example: 'Tripod stability'. Then in the text you could say "Use a carrier bag full of rocks suspended from your tripod for extra stability" (There's another tip!)
    3. No strolling down Tangent Avenue. Keep to the subject.
    4. Use brevity (that means few words). Then, people new to the thread can quickly scan through picking out what they need. No essays, polemics, internecine warfare, or your life history (you can PM me that bit).
    5. Please do not start discussions about someone else's post. We want to keep it tight. If you disagree with the content of a tip, please PM me.
    6. No recommendations to buy specific gear. But you can give general recommendations such as 'Get a tripod'.
    7. Please keep things simple and general. We don't really want to know about some obscure layer icon in CS5.
    8. Please do not add any posts other than tips. If you have an issue with something, please PM me.
    9. I reserve the right to amend/remove any tip post that is innacurate, misleading, or not a tip.
    10. You may include a shot to demonstrate something. Or include a screen-grab to show a screen/manu.


    WHAT SORT OF THINGS CAN I GIVE A TIP FOR?


    • Composition - tips for framing a shot.
    • Anything theoretical or practical, so long as it's connected to photography, but do not make it too specific.
    • Photo-editing - general points, but remember not everyone uses GIMP, or even PS.
    • How to treat gear.
    • Tips on macro shooting
    • Business tips
    • Anything to do with using a camera to take shots.
    • Educational tips
    • PG Tips (no, that's wrong that's a tea)
    • BW conversion tips
    • Anything, in fact.




    Last edited by carregwen; 22nd December 2010 at 02:07 PM. Reason: trivial stuff

  2. #2

    Camera gear precautions

    When you are out taking shots, never, ever put any gear down on the ground, or a 'handy wall' You may well lose it. Put it in your camera bag. Always check the area before you leave.

  3. #3

    Learning to use your camera

    Read the manual!

    Manufacturers go to a lot of trouble, so don't disappoint them.

  4. #4

    Changing lenses

    When changing SLR lenses always point the camera down to the ground, and avoid windy conditions. Amazing how many people don't do this. Never leave the lens off without a cover.

  5. #5

    storing macro extension tubes

    Always keep macro extension tubes wrapped in storage (not just in a box) If they are lying around they can gather dust as they are open (no glass), and when you put them on your camera the dust will transfer to the sensor.

  6. #6

    Photography training

    If you are new, or at intermediate level, try local colleges. They often run good-quality training courses at very reasonable costs.

  7. #7

    Shooting - look back

    When shooting outdoors, always look behind you as well as in front. You will be surprised how often you get an interesting and unexpected view.

  8. #8

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    Changing lenses

    Never change your lens with the camera in the "On" position.
    Last edited by carregwen; 22nd December 2010 at 02:10 PM. Reason: added proper title

  9. #9

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    Using the camera - waterproofing

    I also make my students carry a plastic wrap (newspaper tube they use on rainy days) for that "sudden" rain and to protect the camera from excessive salt spray when shooting at the beach. A small wrap of painters tape secures the bag to the camera without leaving harmful residue. I make it a part of their kit.
    Last edited by carregwen; 22nd December 2010 at 02:11 PM. Reason: added proper title

  10. #10
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Minimising flare

    Always use a lens hood

    ... well, unless there is a valid reason not to; other than laziness or "I don't have one" (get one)

  11. #11
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    Batteries and memory

    Get into a habit of downloading your images (preferably backing them up also) and reformatting your memory cards after each shoot (don't just erase the card in your camera). That way you will be ready for your next shoot without worrying if your batteries are up and if you have room on your memory card...

  12. #12
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    Keep your gear safe

    A tip from one of my teachers: Never park at your shooting location, take gear out of the trunk, and walk away. Stop before you get to the location and get out the equipment you need, so that you don't signal to potential evil doers that you have a bunch of expensive camera equipment in your car. Similarly, don't run into a store for a second and leave your Mark II on the front seat -- "smash and grab" robberies are becoming a real problem.

  13. #13

    Shooting landscapes - choosing a spot

    When shooting landscapes, never walk up to a scene, plant the tripod and take a shot. Walk around. Look at foreground and background objects, their relationships, and choose your position when you have the best composition.

  14. #14

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    Re: Shooting - positioning yourself

    Ever so often, drop down to ground level and have a looksee. It's amazing the things you miss when looking down as opposed to looking up.
    Last edited by carregwen; 22nd December 2010 at 08:25 PM.

  15. #15

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    Re: Using your camera

    NEVER leave home without your camera....I cannot believe I did this, because what was supposed to be an up and back has turned into a two and a half day adventure...and I am cameraless...bah-humbug!

  16. #16

    Composing - Liveview

    take advantage of live view if your camera has it. so many different perspective can be added to your shots

  17. #17
    Peter Ryan's Avatar
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    Re: Shooting - Look Up

    There are many interesting images if you only remember to up, particularly in forests.

  18. #18
    Peter Ryan's Avatar
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    Re: Focusing

    Check out the focusing options in your manual. The default setting for cameras is 'Closest to the Camera Subject Priority’. The camera chooses what it focuses on i.e. whatever is closest. A friend of mine using an ultra-wide angle lens always had his feet in focus.

    Try changing to Single Area (or Single Servo) mode. Keep the focus area centred just point it at what you want in focus, press the focus lock and then recompose. Very simple, very quick and always effective.

  19. #19
    Peter Ryan's Avatar
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    Re: Polarising Filter

    Try using a polariser when shooting in forest to cut the glare off the leaves and saturate the colours. This will reduce your exposure by nearly 2 stops so a tripod is almost inevitable.

  20. #20
    Peter Ryan's Avatar
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    Re: Seeing Light

    Light is either direct, which casts shadows, or indirect with very little or no shadows at all.

    In trying to understand light and the contrast range (dynamic range) in your photography learn to see shadows and their relative strength (i.e. how dark they are?).

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