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Thread: Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

  1. #1

    Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

    A journey through PP. Not that happy with the end product yet but I got a little carried away

    Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

    Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

    Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

    Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

  2. #2
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

    are you suggesting a nuclear meltdown in the final photograph? Could also be interpreted as technical progress.
    Last edited by McQ; 27th November 2010 at 11:05 PM.

  3. #3

    Re: Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

    #4 is obviously into your medicine-cabinet-fuelled-retro-1969-psychedelic-Warhol phase. And I think it's my favourite. I find #1 most engaging too. It's odd how hidden eyes are actually more invasive than those you can see.

    Your photographic style is developing astonishingly as it segues through the tedium and dross of everyday cultural banality. And I don't just mean Warrington.

  4. #4
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

    What I'm most interested in from a learning point of view is to explore what you mean when you say, "Not that happy with the end product yet ...".

    I look at it and I see what I would be very satisfied calling a finished product. So, what is it that isn't meeting your expectations or vision?
    Last edited by Donald; 27th November 2010 at 11:05 PM.

  5. #5

    Re: Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

    are you suggesting a nuclear meltdown in the final photograph?
    Yes John I titled it 'Witness'. I saw some newsreel of American soldiers in trenches watching a nuclear detonation through welding goggles and when I saw my son with his swimming goggled I immediately thought of children witnessing our folly.

    #4 is obviously into your medicine-cabinet-fuelled-retro-1969-psychedelic-Warhol phase. And I think it's my favourite. I find #1 most engaging too. It's odd how hidden eyes are actually more invasive than those you can see.
    Thanks Rob, I have a theory that the less the eye sees the more the brain is stimulated. If you present all the information the brain has little to do. Keep it minimal and the brain has to work hard to fill the gaps....

    Your photographic style is developing astonishingly as it segues through the tedium and dross of everyday cultural banality. And I don't just mean Warrington.
    I am a great fan of Stanley Spencer. His paintings of urbanity and ritual life all contain something that is actually far more prolific. I will have you know that Warrington is the cultural capital of the North! We have a Marks and Spencer, Next and IKEA. We have Subway, Pizza Hut, Kentucky Fried Chicken and several McDonalds. We even had 2 sex shops at one point...they had some very interesting artworks and classical English bedroom attire I can tell you.

    What I'm most interested in from a learning point of view is to explore what you mean when you say, "Not that happy with the end product yet ...".

    I look at it and I see what I would be very satisfied calling a finished product. So, what is it that isn't meeting your expectations or vision?
    Donald, I was not happy with the reflection in the goggles. It is the only area of the image that is totally manufactured and I kept seeing this every time I looked at it. Now I have slept on it it does sit better with me. I could not get the orange tones to my liking and went through a couple of versions including a black and white conversion. I came to the conclusion that the image needs the colour to accentuate the message

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    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Swimming Goggles to Holocaust

    Quote Originally Posted by Wirefox View Post
    Donald, I was not happy with the reflection in the goggles. ... I could not get the orange tones to my liking and went through a couple of versions including a black and white conversion. I came to the conclusion that the image needs the colour to accentuate the message
    Well, to my colour-blinded vision, it looks good. The tones are, of course a matter for you to determine. But, for what it's worth, I think it looks like a reflection rather than a colour painted on to the front of the lenses of the goggles.

    And, yes, it's got to be colour. I couldn't see it working in B & W.

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