Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Dog portraits

  1. #1
    pschlute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    18
    Real Name
    Peter Schluter

    Dog portraits

    I have been experimenting with flash techniques this year (never really used flash creatively before), to photograph our own dogs and and some friends'. The first two are our furry ones.

    Dog portraits

    Dog portraits

    Dog portraits

    Dog portraits

  2. #2
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    31,798
    Real Name
    John

    Re: Dog portraits

    Nice series.

  3. #3
    bje07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Lorient France
    Posts
    1,965
    Real Name
    Jean

    Re: Dog portraits

    Very good lights, nice poses.

  4. #4
    rpcrowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    13,561
    Real Name
    Richard

    Re: Dog portraits

    Lovely images of some very beautiful dogs...

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    7,020
    Real Name
    Dan

    Re: Dog portraits

    The first two are really nice.

  6. #6
    Cantab's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Canada (west coast)
    Posts
    1,323
    Real Name
    Bruce

    Re: Dog portraits

    The first photo is exceptional. There's a combination of factors but it's partly because the dog is looking straight at the camera/the viewer yet his or her body is at a slight angle so it's not like a police mug shot. The lighting works very well.

  7. #7
    pschlute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    18
    Real Name
    Peter Schluter

    Re: Dog portraits

    Thank you all for your kind comments. I am lucky that my two, Ripley and Rio (1 and 2) both seem to be photogenic boys but are very temperamental models !

    Here is a very different one of Ripley I took outside without flash on 35mm film with a Pentax Super A and Pentax 85mm f2.2 Soft-focus lens. I have had mixed responses to it so i know it is not everyone's cup of tea, but I think it has a 1930's Hollywood starlet appeal to it !

    Dog portraits

  8. #8
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Windsor, Berks, UK
    Posts
    16,392
    Real Name
    Dave Humphries :)

    Re: Dog portraits

    Hi Peter,

    They are good and I'm sure I don't need to say that separation from the background (bg) is the tricky part on the dark bg ones - and you have, on the whole, managed it 'just'.

    I can't help thinking a rim light from opposite the key; i.e. rear of subject, camera right in #1 and #2 would improve this aspect.

    If you have another flash you can aim at the (back of the) subject (facing toward the camera), ideally gridded or snooted to prevent your lens picking up direct light and flaring, I think it would help.

    Look at it this way; it's an excuse to buy more kit
    (e.g. another RF/opto triggered flash, grid, bracket and light stand - or DIY equivalents)

    A silver reflector might help, but I fear it may cause flare problems and would be tricky to aim accurately and keep there, if, for example, you moved the key light.


    #1 and #4 are good because we see both eyes and their attention is not 'elsewhere'.

    My wife has a Ripley type dog, I can't imagine it sitting still long enough to take a picture of it - I mean I don't even like it but it still insists on coming in to my face, tongue at the ready for a good 'kiss' every time I get down to its level!

    Cheers,
    Dave

  9. #9
    pschlute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    18
    Real Name
    Peter Schluter

    Re: Dog portraits

    Dave

    Really apprciate you taking time to comment.

    I know what you mean about "just" managing to get the separation right. I resorted to darkening the background in Photoshop on some of these.

    Since I took these I have experimented with a snoot to provide rim lighting. I had limited success with it as the narrow throw of the light and the propensity of the model to go walkabout mid shoot made it somewhat unreliable. An assistant is really needed to keep the dogs in one place. I have honed my technique now so that I place the camera on a tripod and pre-focus and trigger by remote. This enables me to control the dog and also introduce a bit more animation in their expression.

    When I get a moment I will have another session and try out your suggestion.

    Thanks again

    ps. Yes one of the hazards of dog portraiture is getting the front lens element nicely smeared with a nose print.

  10. #10
    Cantab's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Canada (west coast)
    Posts
    1,323
    Real Name
    Bruce

    Re: Dog portraits

    Peter, a case can be made for increasing the separation between subject and dark background; however, the first portrait in particular struck me as being Rembrandtesque -- not an entirely bad thing!

  11. #11
    Digital's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Carrollton, Georgia (USA)
    Posts
    2,285
    Real Name
    Bruce

    Re: Dog portraits

    Peter, nice set of photos.


    Bruce

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •