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Thread: New Techniques Page: Animated 3D Stereo Photography

  1. #1
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    New Techniques Page: Animated 3D Stereo Photography

    This page is not yet accessible from the main website menus, so you need to use the direct link below. It describes an interesting trick that can be fun to experiment with. The article can be viewed via the following direct link:

    How to Create Animated 3D Stereo Photographs

    As usual, any suggestions/feedback/corrections are always welcome.

    FYI, to receive email updates when new articles are added, there's a new feature here.
    Last edited by McQ; 5th October 2010 at 08:57 PM.

  2. #2
    David's Avatar
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    Re: New Techniques Page: Animated 3D Stereo Photography

    Hi Sean - I posted on stereoptic images sometime ago:

    Stereoptic Images

    While the wobble effect is very useful, if you can master a cross-eyed technique the images really jump out. I got used to doing this as a student and then lecturer in chemistry as 3D molecular shapes were being drawn by advanced (for the time) computers with Calcomp plotters. In my experience, you can get the hang of it very quickly, there is no problem using the technique, and there is no eye strain. It's one of those "learning to ride a bicycle" things - once you've got - no probs!

    Regarding separation distances, for close images I found that 2 - 4 inches is usually enough for static cross-eyed viewing. I use a converted bar with a standard 1/4 inch tripod bolt to which I attach the camera. This in turn is fitted to a tripod and the two images are taken by sliding the camera along the bar. While I agree that you want to have a couple of fixed points for aligning separate images, I've also found that you will need to re-angle the camera between shots as well as sliding it along the bar. All this sounds as if if it's a hassle to do, but, again, once you've got the technique there's no probs.

    For longer views you do probably have to have a wider separation, but then you have the interesting feature that you are introducing a 3D effect that normally we cannot see or do not see well. If you look into the distance and obscure anything in the foreground, then there is virtually no stereoptic effect, each eye sees the same. If you use a device that artificially separates the eyes to a greater extent (binoculars with lenses wider than the eye distance), then you do see a 3D image, but it's an artefact of the device, as it is in 3D images such as you discuss. Some people find this disconcerting.

    Cheers

    David

  3. #3
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    Re: New Techniques Page: Animated 3D Stereo Photography

    Thanks for the feedback David. Yes, I agree with you that the stereo image pair technique is much better -- IF you can master the cross-focus technique. The problem is that many people cannot get the hang of this (including myself on most days, which is odd because I can see stereograms almost immediately). Your points about separation distance are helpful, and you bring up a good point about how 3D with telephoto lenses is really adding depth to something that we don't normally see.

  4. #4
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    Re: New Techniques Page: Animated 3D Stereo Photography

    I have an old Pentax point and shoot that would produce a similar effect, however not animated. Two photos would be combined in camera, printed out and then viewed through 3D glasses.

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