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Thread: No Step

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    arith's Avatar
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    No Step

    How can anybody think this could be a step. RB211 but cannot get further away to get the whole thing in, apparently it moved 7.5 tons of air per second, or volcanic dust.

    No Step

    Oh yes almost forgot; if the camera metering is set to spot, doesn't ettl overide that with averaging? which is what I thought it was supposed to do.

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    Re: No Step

    Quote Originally Posted by arith View Post
    Oh yes almost forgot; if the camera metering is set to spot, doesn't ettl overide that with averaging? which is what I thought it was supposed to do.
    Hi Steve,

    Spot / Partial / Evaluative / Center-weighted Metering is for ambient light, ETTL / ETTL II is for the flash component of the exposure, and aren't particularly related (ignoring NEVEC).

    ... if I understand your question correctly.

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    arith's Avatar
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    Re: No Step

    Cheers Colin; I just noticed exif said spot and I had to dial -2 fec to get close. cheers

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    Re: No Step

    That's a lot of air, Steve. I like the close-up: gives a real impression of size. Is the 7.5 tons the weight of air, or dust? FWIW, I expect the "don't step" is to remind mechanics that they shouldn't step on those flaps/diverters or whatever they are. Of course, I'm probably giving a straight answer when you're making a joke.

    Cheers,
    Rick

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    arith's Avatar
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    Re: No Step

    Oh yeh cheers, I was always wondering about this. In the Phantom you can actually walk inside the intake and the first thing you notice is fur, It is a bit like fleece, I said sheepishly. Actually a jet engine is very simple, and has to be. Or it isn't simple, makes no difference. Cheers Rick.

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    Re: No Step

    Quote Originally Posted by rick55 View Post
    FWIW, I expect the "don't step" is to remind mechanics that they shouldn't step on those flaps/diverters or whatever they are.
    My memory is pretty hazy on this (and I did fail my Gas Turbine exam by 1 question!) - but I think they're movable vanes that "adjust" the angle of the air hitting the inlet stator vanes to prevent compressor stall. What aircraft was it Steve?

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    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: No Step

    They just look like some of the main engine core mounting struts to me, I think this is looking in the back end of the fan isn't it Steve?

    The "No Step" is for the 'benefit' of the mechanics.

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    Re: No Step

    Cheers Colin and Dave and Rick; I don't know what aicraft it comes off, the Rolls Royce Spey was used in the British version of the Phantom and Avon in the Lightning but this is way to big.

    No Step

    I think it probably comes off a Jumbo Jet.

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    Re: No Step

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Humphries View Post
    They just look like some of the main engine core mounting struts to me, I think this is looking in the back end of the fan isn't it Steve?
    Looks like you're right Dave

    A fellow photographer popped by the workshop a couple of hours ago ... who also happens to be an Aircraft Mainentance Engineer (including Gas Turbine powerplants). I showed him the image - as far as he can tell it looks like a support strut in the bypass section (and rear end) of one of the older engine used in a 747.

    One of these days I'll pass that darn exam just on principle!

    PS: Just did a little research ... this engine provided around 40,000 to 60,000 pounds of thrust ... around only HALF of what the latest engines like the GE90-115B can produce!
    Last edited by Colin Southern; 19th June 2010 at 03:00 AM.

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    Re: No Step

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    Looks like you're right Dave

    A fellow photographer popped by the workshop a couple of hours ago ... who also happens to be an Aircraft Mainentance Engineer (including Gas Turbine powerplants). I showed him the image - as far as he can tell it looks like a support strut in the bypass section (and rear end) of one of the older engine used in a 747.
    Thanks Colin,

    The knowledge is a product of a mis-spent (waaay too nerdy) youth

    In my defence, I did nearly accept an apprenticeship offer at B.O.A.C. for airliner maintenance, but my parents thought that long term, a job elsewhere was more secure. Considering the subsequent events, good advice, the only thing I miss is the free travel.

    Back to the picture, sort of:
    It did occur to me afterwards; it is possible the supports are 'holding on' the bits outside the core (e.g. outer fan casing), rather than the other way round, depends which bits attach to the aircraft proper.

    I did (after posting) google "RB211 cutaway" and found a diagram that shows these struts in bottom right corner, just to check my waffling. Talking of which, we're way off topic, so I'll pipe down.

    I gather they were also used on some Lockheed L1011 Tristars. (stop, Stop, STOP Dave)

    Cheers,
    Last edited by Dave Humphries; 19th June 2010 at 08:30 AM.

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    Re: No Step

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Humphries View Post
    I gather they were also used on some Lockheed L1011 Tristars. (stop, Stop, STOP Dave)
    Ah - the old L1011 Tristar - the first aircraft that could not only land itself (ala DC-10 and 747), but the L1011 also had auto-take off capabilities.

    In my youthful days I used to cycle out to the "local" airport (probably close to 20km from where I lived) and watch the planes landing and taking off (mostly F27 Friendships) ... and then in my Air Force days I was forever biking out to the "local" international airport (about 15km away). In those days I'd ask security if I could have a look around the cockpit of the likes of 747 / DC10 (try getting a clearnace to do THAT these days!) (and was never turned down) ... and ended up with the nickname of "Cockpit Colin" in the Airforce (yep, even at morning and afternoon tea times you'd find me in the cockpit of whatever aircraft was in the hanger being serviced).

    Ahhh - those were the happy old days

    (end of reminiscing!)

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