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Thread: Turkey Vultures

  1. #1
    Jim B.'s Avatar
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    Turkey Vultures

    Went to visit a friend yesterday.On the way it poured rain.It had stopped by the time I got to the farm,but was foggy from the temp change.Not my best,but I think these are still somewhat interesting.
    2 Vultures drying off on a shed roof.
    Turkey Vultures
    Just over the hill at around 80 yards.
    Turkey Vultures

    50D 300 f/4 IS f/5 ISO 400 1/160"
    Last edited by Jim B.; 23rd May 2010 at 05:57 PM.

  2. #2

    Re: Turkey Vultures

    I like #2, Jim, but I think the exposure is too much. What were the settings, may I ask?

  3. #3
    Jim B.'s Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Vultures

    Rob,

    300mm f/5 ISO 400 1/160".One of the reasons I don't use the 300 that often is the contrast is flat.I shoot neutral picture style with all settings at 0.
    I use it more for close up work than telephoto.One more point,I'm not the greatest at PP,I'm still on the uphill side of the learning curve.
    Here's the original.
    Turkey Vultures
    Last edited by Jim B.; 23rd May 2010 at 06:13 PM.

  4. #4

    Re: Turkey Vultures

    Jim

    Is that how it came out of the camera? Was it shot in RAW? If so, and you don't mind an edit, you could post it here and send me the link. http://uploading.com/signup/

  5. #5
    Jim B.'s Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Vultures

    Rob,

    I shoot RAW.I sent you a link to the file in PM.

  6. #6

    Re: Turkey Vultures

    Thanks, Jim, I downloaded it OK.

    It's not the processing - it's the shot. I really can't figure this one. You have a good camera (Canon 50D) and you used a very nice lens (Canon EF 300mm L). Yet the image quality is not good. The problem with the exposure is that you used spot metering,. I think this scene should have been evaluative to get a reading from the whole area. You probably picked up the metering from spotting a vulture, and being dark it bumped up the exposure. But even so, the image quality looks pretty rough, especially when you zoom in on the RAW. It's hard to see where it focused - I would guess the top bird, but I'm not sure. There seems to be quite a bit of noise; I see you used ISO400 - that should be OK in good light with the 50D (got one myself). I'm a bit puzzled if truth be told. Have you taken many shots with this lens?

    This was the best processing I could do. And here is the EXIF for others to see. Thanks for sending the file. Interesting. Maybe someone else can throw some light on it?

    EXIF data

    Turkey Vultures

    MOD NOTE: Manually added EXIF as the link above seems to require a login to view (private album?) - Dave
    Camera Maker: Canon
    Camera Model: Canon EOS 50D
    Lens: EF300mm f/4L IS USM
    Image Date: 2010-05-22 10:53:44 +0100
    Focal Length: 300.0mm
    Focus Distance: 4294967295.00m
    Aperture: f/5.0
    Exposure Time: 0.0063 s (1/160)
    ISO equiv: 400
    Exposure Bias: +1.33 EV
    Metering Mode: Spot
    Exposure: aperture priority (semi-auto)
    White Balance: Auto
    Flash Fired: No (Manual)
    Color Space: Adobe RGB (1998)
    Weather: Humid, moist and misty
    Last edited by Dave Humphries; 24th May 2010 at 09:26 PM.

  7. #7
    Jim B.'s Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Vultures

    Rob,
    Besides spot metering, I was shooting through pretty thick mist.Focus point is on the bird just above the Y on the center branch.
    Yes,I've shot a good bit with this lens and it produces much better images than this one.
    Definitely shooting conditions and user error here.I was excited to see this many vultures in one spot and didn't pay any attention to my settings.I'm sure there was some camera movement at 1/160".I only got 3 shots off before they spooked.
    Thanks for having a go at processing, it looks much better than my version.
    Here's a shot from same session.I was only 6 yards from the bird(and less excited) as apposed to 80 yards from the tree shot.
    EXIF is intact.
    Turkey Vultures
    Last edited by Jim B.; 24th May 2010 at 04:13 PM.

  8. #8

    Re: Turkey Vultures

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim B. View Post
    Rob,
    Besides spot metering, I was shooting through pretty thick mist.
    Doh! Of course - mist! I knew you were a better photographer than that image (insert creepy smilie here)

  9. #9
    Jim B.'s Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Vultures

    Yeah,I probably should have dumped the tree shots,but knowing I probably won't have an oppourtunity to get a shot like this again,I kept them.
    I'm glad I did because your edit made this one at least acceptable for web viewing.
    Again,thanks for your help.

  10. #10
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    Re: Turkey Vultures

    Why do you say you won't get another shot like that. I have been doing a little research on the turkey vulture, they have migrated as far north as New York state from South America, and will probably be more common in the coming years. They, the turkey vulture, are considered "New World Vultures" and cannot carry their prey because their talons are too weak. When frightened they hiss and are known to project a foul smelling bile at their attacker. The rest of the information requires a steady stomach to read.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim B. View Post
    Yeah,I probably should have dumped the tree shots,but knowing I probably won't have an oppourtunity to get a shot like this again,I kept them.
    I'm glad I did because your edit made this one at least acceptable for web viewing.
    Again,thanks for your help.

  11. #11
    Jim B.'s Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Vultures

    Hi Shadowman,

    I should have been more clear on my statement. I don't know if I'll have another chance at a photo with a dozen vultures together at such a close distance.
    80 yards doesn't sound that close,but these birds can see you coming from a lot farther away and usually will take flight immediately upon seeing you.
    They weren't feeding on anything,just drying off after a downpour.
    I'm thinking about putting a blind up.Might raise the odds for me.
    I agree with your statement that they are becoming very common here.Growing up it was rare to see vultures.Now I see them everywhere.
    The water fowl population has exploded here also. A good example,Steve S.(a member here) has been photographing Great Blue Herons in a rockery not far from my house.There are at least 50 birds nesting there in Sycamore trees 300 yards from the interstate.
    I've read that global warming has a lot to do with the change.

  12. #12
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Vultures

    I think scarce food supply might also be a possibility. We see more seabirds inland, an increase in falcons and hawks in the city, and an increase in foxes. Animals seem to be adapting to the human population and scavenging on our garbage. So I guess overpopulation into the wild animals environment plays a big part in the migration pattern. There is also a controversial practice in upstate NY where beekeepers are being allowed to trap (mostly using snares) black bears.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim B. View Post
    Hi Shadowman,

    I should have been more clear on my statement. I don't know if I'll have another chance at a photo with a dozen vultures together at such a close distance.
    80 yards doesn't sound that close,but these birds can see you coming from a lot farther away and usually will take flight immediately upon seeing you.
    They weren't feeding on anything,just drying off after a downpour.
    I'm thinking about putting a blind up.Might raise the odds for me.
    I agree with your statement that they are becoming very common here.Growing up it was rare to see vultures.Now I see them everywhere.
    The water fowl population has exploded here also. A good example,Steve S.(a member here) has been photographing Great Blue Herons in a rockery not far from my house.There are at least 50 birds nesting there in Sycamore trees 300 yards from the interstate.
    I've read that global warming has a lot to do with the change.

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