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Thread: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

  1. #1

    The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    An eye cup makes it easy to take a picture since it minimize extraneous light and vision fatigues. But will it make any other impacts, since it makes to keep the eye little bit away from the view finder (the original position) of the camera ??

  2. #2

    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    I use one that takes the cup about 25mm from the camera. I have taken the optics out of it though since I could not get the diopter adjustment right (I remove my specs to shoot). Apart from this there is a slight dimming of the viewfinder at the extreme edges (almost imperceptible). It does make for a more comfy shooting position and keeps my big sweaty conk off the LCD. I bought a third party version for my 40D but I suspect this is not really an item you should skimp on (hence having to remove the cheapo optics)

    Steve

  3. #3

    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    thank you for your valuable fast reply ....

  4. #4

    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    I think it's a common fault that most people don't look thoroughly around the viewing area when they take a shot. How many times have we all taken a shot and then when chimping the result we see something that we were sure wasn't there when we pressed the shutter release. I haven't tried a cup, but I can't see how it can help that problem, but yes, it might make it more comfortable.

    EDIT: Please ignore the last six words above. I'm 50+ and I must stop talking about comfort. Next thing, I'll be getting a Thermos and tartan rug for landscape shoots...

  5. #5
    arith's Avatar
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    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    Yes, well. Too clever for me this lot and I sometimes look through the viewfinder and sometimes don't. Well

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    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    Quote Originally Posted by carregwen View Post
    Next thing, I'll be getting a Thermos and tartan rug for landscape shoots...
    Golf trundler. That's what you need....

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    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    In all seriousness, I'm sure that many photographers with perfect vision look through the viewfinder, but still don't see much. Something I'm constantly learning is different things to look for; "where is the model looking?" - "any stray hairs?" - "How's the clothing?".

    Personally I like my eye right up against the cup - any further away and I can't see the periphery of the viewfinder - but then again, the FF camera does have more to look at.

  8. #8

    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    Quote Originally Posted by Klickit View Post
    Golf trundler. That's what you need....
    Only if it's electric. (insert sad git smilie)

  9. #9

    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    In all seriousness, I'm sure that many photographers with perfect vision look through the viewfinder, but still don't see much. Something I'm constantly learning is different things to look for; "where is the model looking?" - "any stray hairs?" - "How's the clothing?".

    Personally I like my eye right up against the cup - any further away and I can't see the periphery of the viewfinder - but then again, the FF camera does have more to look at.
    I'm surprised no one has mentioned liveview. I find with liveview that it's easier to see the whole frame - it's a larger physical area, and you have the space and comfort (that word again, Rob) to view it.

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    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    Quote Originally Posted by carregwen View Post
    I'm surprised no one has mentioned liveview. I find with liveview that it's easier to see the whole frame - it's a larger physical area, and you have the space and comfort (that word again, Rob) to view it.
    I find live view great for low-light work - and for when the camera is low to the ground (there's something about lying on boulders to get a composition right that just doesn't do it for me) - unfortunately for middle of the day shots it's too hard to see anything though

  11. #11
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    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    I agree. Sometimes after looking at the results I find objects in the picture that should not be there. Although my camera has a live view option I do not use it often because I do not like the uncommon camera handling while using it. I can hold the camera more stable when looking through the viewfinder. Therefor if a heavy lense is used I find liveview even more uncomfortable.
    But as usual, a rule has always an exception. I like liveview in interaction with a tripod, especially if manual focusing is necessary. No uncommon camera handling and a good preview of the expected picture.
    I did not use an eye cup yet, but I use an angle finder. Both handling and results are very pleasant. I use it mostly for low angle shots so I do not have to lie on the ground. The picture in the viewfinder is a litte bit magnified (x1.25). I have not recognized darker corners yet.

    Robert

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    Re: The benefits impacts of using a eye cup

    Probably a good example of how we have to train our eyes would be a bride to be looking at a wedding dress in a shop window -v- a photo of the same dress in the same window. When viewing the dress in person all the bride sees is a great looking dress - but when we look at the photo we see the fingerprints on the glass - unwanted reflections etc. So what we need to do when we're looking through the viewfinder is train ourselved to be as critical as we would be evaluating a photo, not as if we were just looking at the scene.

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