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Thread: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

  1. #1

    Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    The Osteospurmum was shot in the garden (no wind). I took 5 shots manually focussed, and stacked them. The water-droplets are real - it had just stopped raining. I was going to post a blow-up of the central flower head as it's so attractive, but I noticed Jim B, had one in his CiC albumn which looks better than mine - here http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/for...achmentid=3763

    The Dandelion was picked in the garden and taken indoors. Natural lighting, backlit with light from North-facing window. First one is BW version of the colour shot that follows it. There wasn't much colour there anyway.

    C&C welcome.

    Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)


    Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)


    Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

  2. #2

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    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    I love the composition on the Osteospurmum.
    Looks like you managed to find a dandelion that had not lost any of it's seeds, and managed to get it inside without dislodging any. I like the colour version better.

    Wendy

  3. #3

    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Quote Originally Posted by ScoutR View Post
    Looks like you managed to find a dandelion that had not lost any of it's seeds, and managed to get it inside without dislodging any.
    I had to walk very carefully from the bottom of the garden!

  4. #4
    Jim B.'s Avatar
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    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Rob,

    All 3 are really nice! I like both versions of the Dandelion.Outstanding detail in the daisey. I'm going to attempt some image stacking this weekend.I've downloaded a trial version of Zerene Stacker.
    What are you using for your stacked photos?

  5. #5
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    I vote for the coloured one too (dandelion, I mean)

    Seems to me that focus stacking is to macro what RAW is (compared) to jpg - no contest!
    Just gonna have to give a try soon

    Do I need to say "brilliant shots" Rob?

    I tend to take that for granted these days (as I hope you know when I forget to mention it)

    Cheers,

  6. #6

    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim B. View Post
    Rob,

    All 3 are really nice! I like both versions of the Dandelion.Outstanding detail in the daisey. I'm going to attempt some image stacking this weekend.I've downloaded a trial version of Zerene Stacker.
    What are you using for your stacked photos?
    I use Helicon, and it's very good. You can download a trial for free if you want to kick it around. Hope you don't mind me linking to your shot (it's very good) Was it the Tamron macro lens?

  7. #7
    Petracsr's Avatar
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    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Could you explain what is invloved with stacking? Beautiful shots.

  8. #8

    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Quote Originally Posted by Petracsr View Post
    Could you explain what is invloved with stacking? Beautiful shots.
    Stacking is using is a program that creates one completely focused image from several partially manually focused images by combining the focused areas. You shoot your subject by taking a series of shots, starting at the front of the depth of field range, and then move through the focus range by adjusting slightly the focus each time to a different point further back. You end up with typically 5-10 shots each with part of the image in focus. The software stacks them together taking the most in-focus part of each. The end result gives the impression to the viewer of a shot that has full depth of field focus. The added bonus being they either think you are very clever, or have a very expensive macro lens!

  9. #9
    Jim B.'s Avatar
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    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Quote Originally Posted by carregwen View Post
    I use Helicon, and it's very good. You can download a trial for free if you want to kick it around. Hope you don't mind me linking to your shot (it's very good) Was it the Tamron macro lens?
    I don't mind at all.I used a Canon 100 macro.

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    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Nice detail on all three. Never thought to bring the flower indoors. No wind and good lighting, More fun trying to confuse the elements outside. Wind, bugs, shade, bright sun, etc.

  11. #11
    Petracsr's Avatar
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    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Rob,
    Thanks for explaining. I think I follow you. For example: I have a dog with a large head and a big nose. On close-up shots, if I focus on his eyes, his nose is blurry and vice versa. So stacking would be one way to get a really close up shot with all of his features in focus, correct? Way down the road for me, but very interesting.
    You guys are very clever.
    Petra

  12. #12

    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Quote Originally Posted by risingwolf View Post
    Never thought to bring the flower indoors. No wind and good lighting, More fun trying to confuse the elements outside. Wind, bugs, shade, bright sun, etc.
    You don't get the natural 'feel' of an outdoor shot, but you certainly do get much better conditions in which to do something different.

  13. #13

    Re: Osteospurmum (African Daisey) and Dandelion head (both stacked)

    Quote Originally Posted by Petracsr View Post
    I have a dog with a large head and a big nose. On close-up shots, if I focus on his eyes, his nose is blurry and vice versa. So stacking would be one way to get a really close up shot with all of his features in focus, correct?
    Yes, you could get your dog's face all in focus, predicated on your ability to get him to sit still! If the subject moves too much, the stacking software can't do a match (it works up to about 4% variance, that's all)

    I'm not sure, but I think stacking was originally more use in the scientific arena. I think there are a quite a few people who prefer images to have some out-of-focus areas. I suppose it's a matter of taste. An alternative method is to get say the first 50% of the image subject perfectly in focus then let it trail out into OOF. That looks more natural.

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