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Thread: Which DSLR?

  1. #1

    Which DSLR?

    I'm thinking about taking the plunge and buying a DSLR. I'm thinking about buying a Nikon D3000 or D5000? I don't want to spend more than that on a camera since this will be my first dslr, and I'm thinking if I get one of these I can invest more in lenses and upgrade to a better camera later when I can afford it.
    I have a regular point-and-shoot right now, but I want more. I love to take pictures, but I need something more capable. I mainly take pictures of my family. I want a camera that is capable of capturing their expressions when they are active (sports, dancing, sliding) without the blur. My old camera isn't fast enough for that. Plus, I need something that does better in low-light settings.
    I am willing to look at Canon cameras as well if anyone wants to suggest any of those. I've just done more research on the Nikon cameras.

  2. #2

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    Re: Which DSLR?

    I would say your first choice is between an 'entry level' body and a 'semi pro' version.

    I'm a 'Canon man' now so I will talk about them. Their starter cameras, like the 500D, are a good piece of basic kit, but for a little extra cost you could consider their semi pro range, like the 50D. Although these are more expensive they are a stronger build with, in my opinion, easier to use controls. But on the downside, apart from cost, they are slightly larger and heavier.

    I would recommend going to a shop where you can handle both ranges and see which feels right for you. Nikon have similar ranges but I won't quote numbers in case I get them wrong.

    While getting good lenses is extremely important, purchasing the 'wrong for you' body then changing it for something else will only waste money which could be put to better use. So think carefully before purchase.

    As an alternative, you may find a good 'semi pro' secondhand body, like the Canon 40D which is still an extremely popular camera; in fact some people actually prefer it to the newer 50D. The 50D, however, has a higher burst rate, frames per second, which is something which may interest you. I mostly shoot wildlife or static subjects so mostly use the single shot setting.

    But I expect one the the Nikon enthusiasts will be along soon to give you some more facts about that range.

  3. #3

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    Re: Which DSLR?

    Well put Geoff - couldn't have put it better myself!

    @ tdelekhan: Keep in mind also that for some situations (sports at night etc) that NO relatively inexpensive camera / lens may give you ideal results ... often these things are a compromise.

  4. #4
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: Which DSLR?

    Hi tdelekhan,

    One Nikon fan reporting for duty

    I have a D5000 and would recommend it over a D3000 due to the 5000 having Live View and the sensor being a bit better at low light.

    However, for maximum lens versatility, you might want to consider the Nikon D90, as that has a built in AF motor which means it can auto-focus with a wider range of lenses than either the D3000 or D5000. It is probably more equivalent to the 40D/50D in Canon's range.

    Welcome to the CiC forums from ...

  5. #5
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: Which DSLR?

    Keep in mind that just because you upgrade to a DSLR you will very likely have the same problems you did with your point and shoot. That is unless the point and shoot you currently have has no functions. My very first digital point and shoot was a Polaroid Digital 320. It had 640x320 resolution, 16MB internal memory, and no zoom setting. It was pretty much one of those one time use cameras with memory. When and if you upgrade to a DSLR you will find certain circumstances where you will not be able to get a shot that works well for you. Take the time to look through the tutorials and forums to see if there are similar problems you were having with the point and shoot. If you can find some of the answers that will help you perfect your shots with the point and shoot, you will be more than prepared when you finally get your point and shoot. Check out the link below for settings to improve your photography with a point and shoot.

    http://www.hp.com/united-states/cons...ips/modes.html

    Quote Originally Posted by tdelekhan View Post
    I'm thinking about taking the plunge and buying a DSLR. I'm thinking about buying a Nikon D3000 or D5000? I don't want to spend more than that on a camera since this will be my first dslr, and I'm thinking if I get one of these I can invest more in lenses and upgrade to a better camera later when I can afford it.
    I have a regular point-and-shoot right now, but I want more. I love to take pictures, but I need something more capable. I mainly take pictures of my family. I want a camera that is capable of capturing their expressions when they are active (sports, dancing, sliding) without the blur. My old camera isn't fast enough for that. Plus, I need something that does better in low-light settings.
    I am willing to look at Canon cameras as well if anyone wants to suggest any of those. I've just done more research on the Nikon cameras.
    Last edited by Shadowman; 12th April 2010 at 11:19 PM. Reason: Adding weblink.

  6. #6

    Re: Which DSLR?

    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff F View Post
    I would recommend going to a shop where you can handle both ranges and see which feels right for you.
    While getting good lenses is extremely important, purchasing the 'wrong for you' body then changing it for something else will only waste money which could be put to better use. So think carefully before purchase.
    I agree. I definitely need to go to the store and handle them and I think that will make my main decision whether to buy a Canon or a Nikon. I've known more people with Nikon so I've researched them more, but I also like what I've seen with the Canon. Basically, I'm not set on either brand right now. At least I have a starting point on which cameras to look at, and from there I'll see which one I feel most comfortable handling. I already take a lot of pictures, so I need something that I can learn with and feel comfortable with.

  7. #7

    Re: Which DSLR?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowman View Post
    Keep in mind that just because you upgrade to a DSLR you will very likely have the same problems you did with your point and shoot. That is unless the point and shoot you currently have has no functions. When and if you upgrade to a DSLR you will find certain circumstances where you will not be able to get a shot that works well for you. Take the time to look through the tutorials and forums to see if there are similar problems you were having with the point and shoot. If you can find some of the answers that will help you perfect your shots with the point and shoot, you will be more than prepared when you finally get your point and shoot. Check out the link below for settings to improve your photography with a point and shoot.

    http://www.hp.com/united-states/cons...ips/modes.html
    Thank You. I've actually played a lot with the settings on my point and shoot to help get better pictures and studying tips on better photography, and I can get some good shots on it, but the response time on it isn't great for kids on the move. I had actually planned on keeping my point and shoot a little longer to learn more on, but it was recently dropped. It still takes pictures, but they don't seem to be as good of quality and the LCD screen has a nice pixel problem that really irks me when I try to take pictures. I have a huge blue and pink mass on it, but at least it doesn't show too bad on the actual pictures themselves. I figure now it's time to learn with a DSLR, which I have always wanted. I expect there to be a learning curve, but I love to take pictures.

    Thank you Dave. I think I'll look at the Nikon D5000 just so that I can get a few extra lenses. But first, before I commit to a brand and their whole system I'll take a trip and try out the cameras.

    Thank You for all of the input!

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