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Thread: what camera do you suggest?

  1. #1
    sapphyrblud's Avatar
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    what camera do you suggest?

    hi, im sapphire. I will be getting a camera soon and i would appreciate your suggestions.
    im more landscape oriented though i also have a keen interest in macro photography and portraiture.
    im looking for a high quality canon which is not too specific in funtionality regardless of the expense.
    im a beginner so i dont want something highly complicated to use but it has to be excellent enough to last me at least six years.
    can anyone please help me out?

  2. #2
    Digital's Avatar
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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Sapphire, is there a camera store near where you live? Also, how much money do you plan to spend on your camera?


    Bruce

  3. #3
    sapphyrblud's Avatar
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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    there's not a camera store very close to where i live, and the highest amount i can spend is 5000 USD.

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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Good question to ask the sales rep in your camera store. The more expensive cameras have more features, but do not be discouraged if there is a lot. You can always work into the features as you get to know your camera. Ask about the differences in the sensors. How do they compare in size or quality between various models. Ask about lenses, do not get too many "kit" lenses to start with unless you get some sort of a package. Ask about the differences in the expense of lenses. Learn something about why some are more expensive than others. Also, be aware that there are some very good "kit" lenses.
    You might consider renting a camera for a week to try out a certain model you are considering. (Borrowlenses.com) is one.

    I did not do that with cameras, but have rented lenses.

    Whoops! I did not see the above post.....ie. no camera store near you. Wow spend around $1000 for your camera and invest the rest in lenses. Cover the range of mm's. Wide angle, macro and zoom. But, before you get a wide angle start with the mid range, eg. 24-105 range and a zoom, 70-200mm, or 70-300mm. As well as zooming in on landscapes, with a zoom you can stand maybe 3' or so from a subject and then zoom in close. Try it with a blooming flower. I would say to hold off on the wide angle for awhile since they are a bit tricky when it comes to composition. No need to over-load yourself with lens options until you get comfortable with your camera and photography.
    Last edited by rambler4466; 19th June 2014 at 02:47 AM.

  5. #5
    sapphyrblud's Avatar
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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Quote Originally Posted by rambler4466 View Post
    Good question to ask the sales rep in your camera store. The more expensive cameras have more features, but do not be discouraged if there is a lot. You can always work into the features as you get to know your camera. Ask about the differences in the sensors. How do they compare in size or quality between various models. Ask about lenses, do not get too many "kit" lenses to start with unless you get some sort of a package. Ask about the differences in the expense of lenses. Learn something about why some are more expensive than others. Also, be aware that there are some very good "kit" lenses.
    You might consider renting a camera for a week to try out a certain model you are considering. (Borrowlenses.com) is one.

    I did not do that with cameras, but have rented lenses.
    thanks a lot

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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Here is a site that I have found helpful with their youtube reviews.
    http://www.cameralabs.com/lenses/Lat..._reviews.shtml


    PS When I was a kid, Germany made the best cameras! (It has been awhile since I was a kid, ie. 1950s) ZEISS!!

    Note that many people list the lenses they own. See what some of your favorites are using.
    Last edited by rambler4466; 19th June 2014 at 03:45 AM.

  7. #7

    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Quote Originally Posted by sapphyrblud View Post
    there's not a camera store very close to where i live, and the highest amount i can spend is 5000 USD.
    You could be in good shape with half that.

  8. #8

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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Hi Saphire.
    $5000 USD is a very generous budget for a camera package - Camera, Lenses and Flash.

    The camera I chose last year and have been very happy with is the Canon 7d. It came on the market 5 years ago and has been a solid performer. With your budget, you can buy something above the Canon Rebel line of cameras. The 7d has many of the features of advanced cameras, but it also can be used in Automatic mode, where the camera decides the exposure (Shutter Speed, Aperture, and ISO)

    For lenses, I chose a 24mm-70mm zoom lens and a 70mm-200mm zoom. This gave me lens coverage from wide angle landscapes to close-up portraits. Lenses vary in quality and price from $200 to $2000 +. Find something in your budget.

    The Flash I chose was a Canon 430 EX ii. It can be used both on and off the camera.

    You will also need a spare battery for the camera, AA batteries for the Flash, and a CF data card.
    Put it all together in a bag, and there goes your $5000. (I have no idea of the camera prices in Germany)

    The best method of shopping would be to go to a couple camera stores and look through the different cameras and lenses. Ask lots of questions. Don't make a decision in the first day, or first store. You want to get the feel of what you are buying.

    Depending on how much you use your camera, and become interested in photography, your camera can last you 5 to 10 years, or you can upgrade it to a more advanced camera in just a couple years.

    Good hunting!

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    Black Pearl's Avatar
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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    What do you use now?

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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Hi Sapphire,

    With the budget you have I would go straight to a Full Frame camera. A FF will be the next step up from a crop frame camera.

    If you insist on Canon I would say an EOS 6D with a 24-70mm lens, it will set you back around $3000. With $2000.00 you can add accessories. Don’t be too hasty with the accessories, use the camera for a while and see what you really need. With the Canon you can add a flash as it does not have a build in flash.

    I would also consider the Nikon D610. The advantage the Nikon has over the Canon is build in flash, a much better focusing system and a few more MP. A D610 with a 24-85 lens will set you back around $3500.00.

    Remember, when buying a good camera you are buying into a SYSTEM and you will be bound by your decision unless you wish to start all over again.

    Both these cameras have a full Auto function to help you out in the beginning. Don’t be shy to use full Auto as it will help you get the shots. But make no mistake both can get very complicated when not used in full Auto. It does not matter if a camera has complicated functions as you will be using them in any case as you get to know your camera better.

    Add an 85 or 100 mm makro lens to either Canon or Nikon system and you will be on your way. For portraiture and landscape photography the 24-70 or 24-85mm lens will be a good choice. For landscape you can add a wide zoom (10 or 12 - 24mm) later (Tamron is not bad).

    Be careful before you buy. Think and read as many reviews as you can on the camera you are interested in. Both Canon and Nikon are excellent cameras that will not disappoint you. Follow your head and not your heart.

    Don’t let anybody convince you to go “cheap”, you will regret it. Cameras are like computers, buy the best you can afford. With the budget you have – DO NOT BUY INTO A CROP FRAME SYSTEM! If you are serious about going some ware with your photography, you will regret it if you waste your money by not investing in a Full Frame system.

  11. #11
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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    That's the trouble with photographers, they have several opinions each!

    I fundamentally disagree with Andre about full frame. There are very few photographers for whom a 70D, for example, would not be an excellent camera, and for whom a similar quality full frame would be worth the extra cost, size and weight. If I were starting out I would go crop frame (or even mirrorless, though that might be a bit controversial )

    Neither of us is right or wrong, it's really up to you to decide what meets your needs best. The good news is that Canon's pro-sumer, and pro cameras are excellent and will certainly do the job for you.

    Dave

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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    That's the trouble with photographers, they have several opinions each!
    I don't even agree with that!
    Remember, when buying a good camera you are buying into a SYSTEM
    Bodies come and go, but lenses are forever...examine lens prices and reviews, then choose body to match.

    Avoid a "kit" lens...maybe a 70-200mm to start, with maybe a set of Kenko extension tubes for a
    macro playing around, tripod...absolutely needed, heed the weight depending on your needs.
    Read that manual as well as the many you-tube videos explaining the use of whatever you buy.

  13. #13
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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Not highly complicated, easy to use, has many features and does not cost as much as the 6D would be the 70D. Excellent camera for the money. The macro lens is not cheap since you want to do macro work and a 100mm L is $1000 though even the non L version is excellent. Balance you could slowly spend on other lenses, flashguns, studio lights, PS or LR5 etc.,

  14. #14

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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Quote Originally Posted by davidedric View Post
    That's the trouble with photographers, they have several opinions each!

    I fundamentally disagree with Andre about full frame.
    Dave
    Dave might disagree about FF but no Landscape and/or Portrait Photographer will disagree with going for a FF camera – with a $5000.00 budget. You did say you wish to do Landscape Photography, did you not?

    A $5000.00 budget restricts you from purchasing a Professional camera and knowledge in using a Professional camera forces you to rather go for a prosumer camera (on a $5000.00 budget), like the 6D or D610 (both with a full AUTO feature).

    If for any reason you wish to stick to becoming a “happy snappy photographer” get yourself a bridge camera for around $300 and invest the balance in Unit Trust with a South African fund managing company, like Coronation Fund Managers. You should have about R45000.00 to invest at an annual return of 12-20% on capital, depending on what the world economy is doing and the fund you invest in.

    Good Luck!

  15. #15
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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    which is not too specific in funtionality regardless of the expense.
    im a beginner so i dont want something highly complicated to use but it has to be excellent enough to last me at least six years.
    Sapphire,

    My advice is: start slowly. Do not spend $5000 until you have some experience. You risk wasting your money because you won't know which things are most useful for YOU.

    Some specifics:

    -- All of the choices will be fairly similar in terms of how you use them. Some of the newer and more expensive cameras offer more options, and it can take time to choose between the options, but you can simply use them as they come out of the box. The main things you will have to worry about--learning to control exposure, learning the effects of aperture on depth of field, learning to use autofocus well, etc.--will be similar on any Canon digital SLR.

    --I see that your question has already caused the usual 'do you need to buy a full frame camera' argument. My short answer is: no. I own and use both full frame and crop sensor cameras. Full frame does offer some advantages. All other things equal, full frame cameras perform better in low light, and they provide more detail in large prints. However, they are much more expensive, larger, heavier, and require larger, heavier, and more expensive lenses to attain the same reach. And the fact is that when lighting is reasonable and you display either on the web or in modest-sized prints (say, A4), you really won't see much if any difference. My advice would be to buy a crop sensor camera for now and save the money. If you find later that a full frame is worth the extra, trade up. If you buy EF rather than EF-S lenses, you will be able to use the lenses on either format. However, for some ranges, the better choice will be to buy EF-S, or another brand made specifically for crop sensors, so I wouldn't worry about it.

    --In the Canon line-up, you get better controls with the 60D/70D/7D range than with the cheaper models. I don't trust rumors, but it seems likely that the 7D is about to be replaced by a new model. You might instead buy the 70D or wait a few months to see whether the 7DII is really coming.

    --given your interests, if you do buy a crop sensor camera, my suggestion for a starter lens is a zoom in the 17-50mm range. There are a number to choose from. Canon makes a very good (but expensive) 17-55. Sigma and Tamron both make competing lenses. For macro, a good compromise focal length would be 100mm. I have the 100mm L, which is a fabulous lens, but the fact is that cheaper macro lenses, such as the Canon 100mm non-L, are optically very close in quality, and you won't notice a practical difference. The main advantage of the L is image stabilization. For longer lenses, there are a lot of telephoto zooms in the 70-200 and 70-300 range, but picking one will take some work. Given your uses, I would feel comfortable with an f/4 lens (that is what I have) rather than the bigger, heavier, and more expensive f/2.8.

    --Given your interests in macro and portraiture, you will need a flash. I also use the Canon 430 EX II.

    In general, I would buy the minimum that you need-- a camera body, a flash, and at most a few lenses -- and get some experience before you decide what more you need. And if you can, try before you buy.

    Dan

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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    I'm with Dan on this one. Although it's temping because you have so much to spend to go big I would start slow and work my way up there is a lot to learn and you don't want to get frustrated. I would not even worry about buying a add on flash right now, flash photography is a skill with in it self and takes time to master. The Canon EOS Rebel T3i DSLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm IS II Lens Kit is perhaps the best selling kit out right now and a great way to get started in this wonderful hobby but that's just my two cents worth

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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Sapphire: I read back on some of your other posts, I found something most interesting in your very first post in Introduce your self, you say you are obsessed with photography and you want the very best. That is a very bad combination, to the way my brain works that tells me you are not thinking things through. The best camera and equipment will not produce good images, that is up to the person behind the camera and that is you.
    Now you are going to get lots of suggestions, full frame, crop-sensor, lens, etc., each has there own strengths and weakness, they are only a tool. Now by the way you write I am going to say you are young (compared to me) and by your name that would make you a young woman. Now I am pointing this out because your hands are likely small compared to a man's hands, and the camera you purchase is not just it's features but how it feels in your hands. You do not want to purchase a camera then once you get it is just does not feel right. So you need to get to a store, pick up the different models see which feels good in your hands, then go home decide which you liked the best, then get it. As for lens if you go with a crop camera, I would still purchase EF lens and not the EF-S lens because if you go at some later time to Full Frame the EF-S lens will not work, however the EF lens will work on the types of cameras. I would go with something in the 24-70mm range and 105mm macro which will also work great from portraiture. Also remember you also need a tripod, a cable release, maybe a flash unit, a monitor along with a system to profile it, you think you are going to get accurate colour from your laptop? Ever try to work on a 13" screen I would rather be killed by fire ants than work on a small screen. Did I also say anything thing about the post processing software, and do not get me going on printing.
    So you say you have $5000.00 US to spend on a camera and lens, think again. It is alright to be obsessed about photography, however be smart about it and think things out before jumping. It is not about the equipment, it is what is behind your to eyes that makes a good image, all the rest just helps you get there.

  18. #18
    Melkus's Avatar
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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    I agree with Allen best to always find a store that has the brand your looking for and see how it feel in your hands

  19. #19

    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    I suggest to you the Canon 7d camera, I think that it is perfect for beginner.

  20. #20

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    Re: what camera do you suggest?

    Some really good advice here from Dan and Alan. All I would add is that when you try out the various models (don't buy over the internet until you know what you are getting), don't dismiss interchangeable lens mirrorless cameras with DX size sensors. This is where all the development is and if you are making a six year investment in a system, the rate at which these cameras are improving will leave you with excellent performance into the future. I have both an SLR and a mirrorless camera, both with DX size sensors. For landscape work, I can't tell the difference in image quality but the size/weight factor has me using the mirrorless camera far more than my SLR. I shoot most weeks but I used my SLR for the first time yesterday in about two to three months and only then because I have longer lenses for that camera. The downside is that there are far less third party lenses and accessories for the current crop of mirrorless cameras but that will change.

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