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Thread: Paper selection

  1. #1
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    Paper selection

    As a hobbyist, I've recently begun printing my images using an Epson 1400 (dye) and would appreciate being pointed in the right direction with respect to paper selection. I'm sure this does become a matter of personal preference, but is there a general usage guide as to which paper finishes lends itself to type of image, ie landscape, B&W, portrait, fine detail, etc.? I've tried some searches, but haven't identified many sources of information. I would appreciate any insights from your experiences.

    Thanks in advance for any replies.

  2. #2
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    Re: Paper selection

    Anyone?

  3. #3
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Paper selection

    Sorry you haven't had a reply on this. I'm afraid I'm completely ignorant on the subject (at the moment). I had hoped to see some posts coming through so that I could learn as well.

    The only thing I know about paper is what I've picked up here

  4. #4

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    Re: Paper selection

    I'm using the Epson R1900.

    Basically I don't think there are any firm rules as long as you use good quality paper and real ink. It's all down to personal preference. Some people like a softer finish for personal portraits or a very glossy paper for outdoor events. For example a high gloss for a sports car but a matt finish for an old house. Black & white often looks effective on high gloss. Some people like paper which recreates those old black & white film prints. I have tried some of the classic Ilford papers for this effect.

    Just be creative. In the UK we are fairly limited as to what is commonly available but I understand that in the US you are spoilt for choice.

    While Epson paper works well with Epson printers, you don't have to be tied to one manufacturer. Although you can sometimes have problems getting true colours if you don't have the correct paper profiles linked to your printer. But for most people who aren't fanatical about this, a simple colour adjustment tweak to the printer will make a big difference. It can, however, take a bit of experimentation to work out the best adjustment so using a ready made profile is usually easier.

    So what do I normally use: Epson matte (good for insects etc where I want to see fine detail); Epson Premium Glossy (for general use); Epson ultra glossy (for anything requiring an extra smooth high gloss); Supermarket own brand best glossy (for proofs or quick cheap prints to take down the pub).

    Incidentally, as a totally unscientific experiment last year, I printed the same couple of images onto a selection of papers and took them to the pub (my fiercest critics) to ask which were the preferred papers. Glossy came first but, surprisingly to me, matte was close behind with several people asking where it could be obtained. Last of all was semi glossy with no votes at all.

  5. #5
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    Re: Paper selection

    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff F View Post
    I'm using the Epson R1900.

    Basically I don't think there are any firm rules as long as you use good quality paper and real ink. It's all down to personal preference. Some people like a softer finish for personal portraits or a very glossy paper for outdoor events. For example a high gloss for a sports car but a matt finish for an old house. Black & white often looks effective on high gloss. Some people like paper which recreates those old black & white film prints. I have tried some of the classic Ilford papers for this effect.

    Just be creative. In the UK we are fairly limited as to what is commonly available but I understand that in the US you are spoilt for choice.

    While Epson paper works well with Epson printers, you don't have to be tied to one manufacturer. Although you can sometimes have problems getting true colours if you don't have the correct paper profiles linked to your printer. But for most people who aren't fanatical about this, a simple colour adjustment tweak to the printer will make a big difference. It can, however, take a bit of experimentation to work out the best adjustment so using a ready made profile is usually easier.

    So what do I normally use: Epson matte (good for insects etc where I want to see fine detail); Epson Premium Glossy (for general use); Epson ultra glossy (for anything requiring an extra smooth high gloss); Supermarket own brand best glossy (for proofs or quick cheap prints to take down the pub).

    Incidentally, as a totally unscientific experiment last year, I printed the same couple of images onto a selection of papers and took them to the pub (my fiercest critics) to ask which were the preferred papers. Glossy came first but, surprisingly to me, matte was close behind with several people asking where it could be obtained. Last of all was semi glossy with no votes at all.
    Paper selection that matches the printer, this is what I have been told and I usually receive photo paper with my ink purchases so I usually stick with the printer brand. I sometimes try matte finish and some of the advanced photo papers but what usually works for me is to have a setting on the printer that allows more ink than usual and don't forget good photo ink cartridges.

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