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Thread: Nikon D3200?

  1. #1
    alexis88's Avatar
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    Nikon D3200?

    Hello everybody!
    I am thinking to buy a camera to my brother as a gift and I was thinking about Nikon D3200. I also have Nikon, so I ll stick to that brand!
    He has never had a DSLR, so I wouldnt want to buy something that would be really complicated to use.
    However, I also wouldnt want to buy one with limited abilities.
    What do you think about it? Any other suggestions?
    Thank you in advance guys!

  2. #2
    Clactonian's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon D3200?

    I'm just about to buy one myself as a lightweight travel camera as my D2Xs kit is not budget airline friendly. Yes there are a few advance features missing but most of the commonly used are still there, just buried in the menu system rather than accessible from buttons and switches. The 24Mp sensor may challenge the kit lens for anything other than smallish prints and web use, which is why mine will be accompanied by the 35mm F1.8. which apparently holds up a treat.
    All in all you are getting a lot of camera for your money and with the simple beginners interface an ideal camera to start in the DSLR world.

  3. #3
    GrahamS's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon D3200?

    The D3200 is a wonderful beginners camera and will allow plenty of advancement. However, I agree with Mike regarding the kit lens. The 18-55 isn't really up to the job with the 24mp sensor and you would be better advised to buy the 18-105 f3.5-5.6 VR instead.

  4. #4
    RustBeltRaw's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon D3200?

    I'd echo Mike & Graham. Get the body only, then look for a decent piece of glass on the used market. Personally, I'm in the "start with primes" camp, but first and foremost, the lens needs to match your brother's needs.

    Make sure you encourage him to ask questions any time. I find that not knowing where to turn is one of the things that holds new photographers back - helps if they have someone to call or text.

  5. #5
    New Member PhoTom's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon D3200?

    The 3200 is a good camera. As an alternative, you may want to see if there are any 5100s left. I bought a refurb with a kit lens for only $440 or $460 for my father. They have a swivel screen and with 16 MP, it won't challenge the kit lens like a 24 MP would. This is also a step up From the 3000 series in some ways. As already stated, the 3200 has most of the features and picture quality of the pro models, but they tend to be buried in menus.

  6. #6

    Re: Nikon D3200?

    The 3200 is a great choice. it has 24mp and really nice. Either the nikon 3200 or the canon rebel t3i are good for beginners. You don't need anything better as long as it is not a profession. You can see more specs and info of the D3200 at http://www.thehonestreviews.com/vide...camera-review/ if you're planning on getting one.
    Last edited by DreamBanger; 1st October 2013 at 03:05 AM.

  7. #7
    Clactonian's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon D3200?

    Quote Originally Posted by DreamBanger View Post
    You dont need anything better as long as it is not a profession.
    It would be a mistake to right off an entry level camera as not being good enough for a professional, which I hasten to add that I'm not. Most cameras these days make few compromises in the image quality department at this level. They mostly just lack the build quality and external controls but add some optional hand holding features that more expensive cameras do not have. Simply turn those off as confidence and competence grows.
    Interestingly an eminent photographic commentator suggested recently that the level of sophistication reached now at all levels of camera, and the pace of change, made it harder to justify spending thousands of pounds/dollars on a 'professional' camera that would last decades, and that most would be better off buying a cheaper model and 'throwing it away' when newer and improved models become available. Invest in glass and not the box that holds the sensor.

  8. #8
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon D3200?

    Hi Alexandros,

    You're probably aware of this, but I'll just mention that if considering purchasing a D3xxx or D5xxx series camera as Body Only, then looking for suitable glass; you need to ensure the lens(es) have the "AF-S" designation, it is easy to overlook this, more so with primes, where it might be easy to accidentally purchase a second hand "D" lens (say a 50/1.8), which won't then auto focus on those bodies (but the 50/1.8 AF-S will).

    All the best,

  9. #9
    Clactonian's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon D3200?

    There's no doubt, Dave, that auto focus is a boon, particularly if like me you wear glasses, but looking through some old images taken with manual focus cameras I don't see any more misses than I get now. The trouble with automation is the tendency to speed up and assume that this wonderful box of tricks is going to work it all out. Apparently Utopia doesn't exist!!
    You may have read my recent post relating to a Voigtlander 20mm manual focus lens I bought to accompany my D3200. Guess what, I've slowed down, am paying heed to to hyperfocal distances etc. and really enjoying the journey back to the old ways. There are still aids to help my poor eyesight and it is a simple job to switch on the rangefinder in the viewfinder.
    Arguably the inexperienced will learn more from going back to basics but that would generally mean buying older secondhand lenses that have an aperture ring and a distance/depth of field scale, that are sadly missing on modern lenses.
    I guess this is step too far for somebody new to a DSLR and therefore not to be recommended.

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