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Thread: Colour Space Black & White

  1. #1

    Colour Space Black & White

    Hi

    I am using CS5 for post processing of RAW files and I really dont like the look of the image when I change to Black and White. is it the colour profile or the colour that is on the original image thats the issue? maybe its my colour setting in my camera? (D300s) what do I do?

    Clare

  2. #2
    davidedric's Avatar
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    Re: Colour Space Black & White

    Hi Clare,

    You really need to post one of the photographs that is concerning you, and why, and some more details of the changes that you made in CS. I'm sure the b&w hot shots here will be able to help

    Dave

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    Administrator Manfred M's Avatar
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    Manfred Mueller

    Re: Colour Space Black & White

    It's also quite possible that your computer monitor is not set up properly and is showing a colour cast with B&W images.

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    DanK's Avatar
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    Re: Colour Space Black & White

    is it the colour profile or the colour that is on the original image thats the issue? maybe its my colour setting in my camera? (D300s)
    If you are shooting raw, the camera settings should not matter. It's not clear to me what you mean by colour profile. Do you mean the color working space (sRGB, aRGB, ProPhotoRGB)? This should not make much difference either, but my general rule is to leave it in the largest color space as long as possible, just to have editing headroom.

    Re the color in the image: Yes, that can make a huge difference.

    Conversion from color to a good black and white image is not automatic. It generally takes considerable editing. For example, for my tastes, the tonal range is often compressed (look at the histogram) and needs to be expanded by use of white and black points or the equivalent, and the contrast is often too low for my tastes. In addition, you can control the conversion of individual color channels, in essence doing what color filters did in the days of film. You will have to do some reading; this is more complicated than can be answered in posts. You might start with the relevant tutorial on this site, http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...lack-white.htm.

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