Helpful Posts Helpful Posts:  0
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: How often is everyone upgrading their Photoshop?

  1. #1
    pixel pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    191
    Real Name
    Peter Phun

    How often is everyone upgrading their Photoshop?

    Hi everyone,
    I'm just curious about how often everyone upgrades their Photoshop or Lightroom apps.

    I tend to skip every other one. Currently still using CS3 because CS4 is not 64 bit for Macs yet.

    Sometimes my hand is forced because the college I teach at wants to always be on the cutting edge even if it's not a significant upgrade.

    I've written a post on upgrading software but would like some suggestions from Windows users on what apps to use to clone their start up volume to step backwards or restore if the upgrade doesn't go well.

    Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

  2. #2
    arith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Burton on Trent, UK
    Posts
    4,788
    Real Name
    Steve

    Re: How often is everyone upgrading their Photoshop?

    Never; in fact I use Helicon Filter and deliberately choose the older version since it has a sensor map facility for dust and fixed noise.

    I might upgrade Gimp if they have a 16 bit verion and would like a 16 bit version of Autostitch but was put off by one of the example images which had a broken flag pole.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,342
    Real Name
    Steve

    Re: How often is everyone upgrading their Photoshop?

    I still use UFRaw and Gimp................i'd rather spend $1000 on a new lens right now. Gimp is a great program, it just doesn't support 16bit file yet, but it's coming.

  4. #4
    Davey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    530

    Re: How often is everyone upgrading their Photoshop?

    Whenever I get a new machine I get whatever version is out then and tend to make do until I need a new machine. I've always done it this way with most software including windows OS but I tend to upgrade linux or bsd machines a few months after a release has gone stable (except on test rigs but thats more hobbyist (see definition of "sad" ) and something a bit different). Saying that I use ones than have slow release schedule so similar timescale on upgrades.

    I find by the time a new version is a must it's time to get a new machine since by then most other components need changing too to bring up to speed with current environment and it's better to build/buy new comp and ather than retire the old machine I find another use for it that is more suited. Other than wear and tear if your current rig runs perfectly fine for you and you don't need extra features that may be added to newer software then upgrade is not necessary.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    17,662
    Real Name
    Have a guess :)

    Re: How often is everyone upgrading their Photoshop?

    Hi Pete,

    I seem to always end up with the latest version at some point, although not usually right away.

    In terms of cloning HDDs, I wouldn't bother; clean installs usually work a lot better, and personally, I think it's a good idea to just fit a brand new HDD at that time (a) so it resets the odo to 0km, and (b) it gives you something to fall back to if the "effluent" hits the "impeller"!

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    USA - California
    Posts
    445

    Re: How often is everyone upgrading their Photoshop?

    I tend to be an early-adopter of new technology. I'll even grab beta copies if they're available. There are crowds that like to wait until the "bugs have been fixed" before upgrading. Those are usually the people who aren’t competent enough to troubleshoot simple problems, in my opinion. Software companies, especially large ones like Adobe, have huge QA departments. I see the "waiting for bugs to be fixed" more as a lost opportunity to use the latest tools, conveniences, and enhancements.

    Often times there are special deals around for the first week or so when a new version is released. In addition, upgrade pricing is usually cheaper if you move to each version instead of skipping (not in total, but per-upgrade). It should be a yearly budget to upgrade software.

    I'm glad that your "hand is forced" to upgrade. I went to a private college specifically for digital media and they tended to have old versions of software and hardware. I was extremely frustrated with the school calling its equipment "state of the art", when it clearly was not. In the end, I ended up learning more at home on my own computer and software then I did in the labs from school. Students should be trained on the latest and greatest so when they get out to the workforce, their knowledge is up to date. There are also issues of students doing work at home, who will often have the latest versions of software. Incompatibility between file formats can occur, causing headache. When I graduated CS3 was out. The school was still running CS. From my self-training at home for CS3, I had a much easier time getting work work right out of school than the rest of my class. No employer wants to hire someone and have to train them on something they should already know (i.e. get them up to date with the current software). They would much rather employ someone who can hit the ground running.

    If you're a home user, then I would say upgrade as often as your pocketbook allows. For the school you work at, I firmly believe they should always have the latest version, as I have been on the other end of that stick.
    Last edited by KentDub; 23rd November 2009 at 04:19 PM.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    USA - California
    Posts
    445

    Re: How often is everyone upgrading their Photoshop?

    As far as cloaning hard drives - this became a bad idea every since people moved over to Windows NT (i.e Windows 2000, XP, Vista, 7). It becomes ever difficult with each new version of Windows. You are far better off, as Colin suggested, doing a fresh install.

    This is a lot of work, I know. If you are looking to do it at work for a whole lab of computers, have your IT department setup a Windows Deployment Server (the Windows Server 2008 Role). There are older Windows 2000/2003 equivilants to thsi feature. This will allow you to "Boot to Network" and start installing Windows. You (or your IT department) can create "answer" files to completely automate the installation, automate configuration, and even automate some software installations (such as the Adobe suite, or Microsoft Office). This requires a moderate amount of work to setup, but if you are constantly reformatting, it's the way to go.

    --
    If you are looking more for protection against a failed upgrade from CS versions, then make sure the System Restore feature is on for Windows (XP, Vista, 7). Ensure it is enabled for all of your drives - and even go as far to manually create a restore point before starting the installation. The restore points arn't fail-proof, and sometimes cause things to get worse. They are, however, worth trying before resorting to reformatting, but should only be used after (at a minimum) basic troubleshooting of the failed installation.

  8. #8
    rpcrowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    12,426
    Real Name
    Richard

    I only upgrade when...

    I only upgrade when the older version cannot perform a function that I need which the newer version can perform.

    But, then again, I am not the lead drummer in the New Equipment Parade. I only get new equipment/software when the old is not doing what I want it to do. As an example, I skipped the entire generation of EOS film cameras; preferring instead to remain with my manual focus 35mm SLR cameras. I am still running Windows XT and will not switch until I am forced to.

    I presently use Adobe CS3 (which I got at a student discount) along with several plug-ins. This program suites me just fine and I cannot envision upgrading until I have exhausted the capabilities of CS3.

  9. #9
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Windsor, Berks, UK
    Posts
    16,038
    Real Name
    Dave Humphries :)

    Re: I only upgrade when...

    I tend to agree with Richard above, I don't upgrade unless there's a feature I particularly want/need in a newer version, I still don't know how to use half of Elements 6

    .. and most of the features in newer versions of PP software seem to be aimed at making skilled jobs less skilled (if you know what I mean), so I'd rather learn the skill and understand why and when to apply it.

    Same goes for camera kit in general in fact.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •