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Thread: "Anna"

  1. #1
    Edwin Harvey's Avatar
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    "Anna"

    I am after some feed back from members, as to which is the more favourable, the b&w or the colour version.
    I have just recently purchased a scanner & have been busy for weeks scanning my old slides & negatives, man what a task! These two images are a small part of some I have managed to recover in Photo shop.
    Cheers..... Edwin.

    "Anna"

    "Anna"

  2. #2

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    Re: "Anna"

    You do have a job ahead of you processing your newly scanned images! As to your question, I prefer #1 as I find the noisiness of the color in #2 distracting. As it is I think your processing of #1 enhances the image.

  3. #3
    gregj1763's Avatar
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    Re: "Anna"

    Number 1 for me as well Edwin. The noise in the colour version is a distraction from the subject. A nice profile of a cute little girl.
    Cheers, Greg

  4. #4
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Just add 'MacKenzie'

    Re: "Anna"

    Yep - Make that 3 for #1

  5. #5
    pnodrog's Avatar
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    Re: "Anna"

    Edwin what scanner and scanner software are you using? I have scanned over 2000 photographs with many thousands more to go. It took sometime to get scans to the quality that I felt reasonable. High contrast and noise tended to happen on denser film (over exposed neg or under exposed slide). If it is a problem it may pay to just play with the settings before you scan to many.

    I prefer the B&W version and for some of my more difficult (confess - badly exposed) photographs I find converting to B&W is often more successful. As I scanned I also labelled filed the film in a semblance of order and I have been able to go back and rescanned some of the more important ones as my skill improved.

    Good luck it's a big task.

  6. #6
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: "Anna"

    #1 for me, the second could work but you would have to alter the left, more clear side so that it resembles the right. That would give it an overall more antique look.

  7. #7
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: "Anna"

    Mostly I find that the quality achieved from flatbed scans is not as good as either the original slides or negatives and certainly not as good as can be achieved from today's digital cameras.

    I really like the image you posted. Especially the B&W version. The lack of clarity works quite well and it sort of looks like an old paper negative print. However, I am not sure that it would work well with other subjects...

    Here is an interesting article regarding scanning...

  8. #8
    Edwin Harvey's Avatar
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    Re: "Anna"

    The Scanner I'm using is Photo Maker, by a company called Kaiser Baas & I use Photoshop Elements 10 for the final editing. You are not wrong in saying that it is a gargantuan task.
    Quote Originally Posted by pnodrog View Post
    Edwin what scanner and scanner software are you using? I have scanned over 2000 photographs with many thousands more to go. It took sometime to get scans to the quality that I felt reasonable. High contrast and noise tended to happen on denser film (over exposed neg or under exposed slide). If it is a problem it may pay to just play with the settings before you scan to many.

    I prefer the B&W version and for some of my more difficult (confess - badly exposed) photographs I find converting to B&W is often more successful. As I scanned I also labelled filed the film in a semblance of order and I have been able to go back and rescanned some of the more important ones as my skill improved.

    Good luck it's a big task.

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