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Thread: Pictures from a park-- critique?

  1. #1
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    Pictures from a park-- critique?

    Hi Guys!

    The last time I posted here I got a lot of fantastic feedback, and was hoping to get some more from the talented folks on this forum. I have taken some photos in a park, and chose the 3 ones I thought stood out (even though the subject matter is totally uninteresting). I did a little white balancing on the "Path" photo, but beyond that these are unedited. What are your thoughts?

    These were all shot on a Canon Rebel T3i with a Kit Lens.

    1/100
    ƒ/5.6
    ISO 800
    55 mm
    Pictures from a park-- critique?
    Full size here: Path

    1/100
    ƒ/3.5
    ISO 400
    18 mm
    Pictures from a park-- critique?
    Full Size here: Sweet Inspiration

    1/1250
    ƒ/3.5
    ISO 200
    18 mm
    Pictures from a park-- critique?
    Full Size Here: Bench

    Thanks again.

    -Pav
    Last edited by ptrikutam; 9th February 2013 at 09:27 PM.

  2. #2

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    Re: Pictures from a park-- critique?

    Possibly a little difficult to answer this without a specific question, Pav.

    However, what would I have done here:

    This one has too much out of focus foreground. My experience has been that this sort of shot must have a sharp foreground fading to a blurred distance. When the foreground is out of focus you are on a loser before you start.

    The second also has a foreground blur but it is just a narrow strip so I would crop that foreground grass by half and a matching amount from the left side. But you need a narrower aperture to give greater depth of focus for the scene to work well.

    I would double the Iso and preferably use a tripod to allow for a reduced shutter speed.

    Your last shot, of the bench, is a good idea but you have background problems; not really your fault. The bench is too dark while the background is too bright. I wouldn't be photographing that bench at that time.

    However, cropping the top and left side would help to reduce the distraction.

    But, as you said, the subjects are somewhat uninteresting so it would be difficult to produce anything startling here.

  3. #3
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    Re: Pictures from a park-- critique?

    Thanks, Geoff. No real question here-- just curious what CiC thinks. Tough to really get much out of a simple stroll in the park, as far as subject matter goes. Appreciate the feedback!

  4. #4
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Pictures from a park-- critique?

    I think Geoff has summed up the key points.

    But .............
    Quote Originally Posted by ptrikutam View Post
    Tough to really get much out of a simple stroll in the park, as far as subject matter goes.
    Turn that around to read - Going out into the park presents great opportunities and challenges to find and compose pictures - and you've got a whole new perspective ............ and learning opportunity.

  5. #5
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    Re: Pictures from a park-- critique?

    I'm with you on this one, Don. Parks are great places. The ones I visit never stop rewarding me. Its all to do with the approach. Instead of looking for 'things' of interest, Pav, take note of places of interest. I have no idea what this park looks like but I'm already intrigued by the clump of forest at the end of the path. It looks a bit spooky to me. Could you get inj a bit close and give us a bit of a feel for the place. What about under the bench? Whats going on there? Don't try to get too exotic and ambitious with the shots either. Just stick to straight descriptive shots until you have matered the skills needed to go arty farty. Looks like someone has told you about leading lines and convergence but forgot to tell you the rest of the story, which is, there needs to be something worth saying. Keep an eye on the frame as well. You are not only confined to the frame. With a little bit of skill you can include what you want and hint at what is out there.
    If you visit the park often, go back and do it again and again. You'll start seeing things you never saw before.

  6. #6
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: Pictures from a park-- critique?

    I could spend hours in a park, especially if there are mischievous squirrels skittering about.

    Pav, it looks like you know how to make an ordinary image a bit different just with your choice of perspective in the second and third image. Use that to your advantage and try photographing simply items in new ways.

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