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Thread: Busy As ...

  1. #1

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    Busy As ...

    I have been observing the way folk here crop images to improve them by focusing the viewer's attention. Here is capture I took a few months back,
    Busy As ...

    And here is how I cropped it:

    Busy As ...

    I would appreciate any suggestions to improve on the crop

  2. #2
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: Busy As ...

    Quote Originally Posted by FootLoose View Post
    I would appreciate any suggestions to improve on the crop
    Hi Greg,

    In a few words, don't put the bee dead centre - e.g. is a crop possible that puts it closer to one of the (rule of) thirds intersections?.

    If the subject is the bee, you really needed to get closer (with a macro lens - or a P&S camera), ensure the subject is not in shadow and not close to anything else bright and sharp.

    HTH,

  3. #3

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    Re: Busy As ...

    In addition to Dave's comments, keep in mind that such a dramatic crop will result in a file that is so small that you will also be dramatically limited in the size of the print that can be made.

  4. #4

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    Re: Busy As ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Humphries View Post
    Hi Greg,

    In a few words, don't put the bee dead centre - e.g. is a crop possible that puts it closer to one of the (rule of) thirds intersections?.

    If the subject is the bee, you really needed to get closer (with a macro lens - or a P&S camera), ensure the subject is not in shadow and not close to anything else bright and sharp.

    HTH,
    Dave, I thought it was necessary to get quite close (physically) to the subject in order to use a macro lens?

  5. #5

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    Re: Busy As ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Buckley View Post
    In addition to Dave's comments, keep in mind that such a dramatic crop will result in a file that is so small that you will also be dramatically limited in the size of the print that can be made.
    Thanks Mike.

  6. #6
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: Busy As ...

    Quote Originally Posted by FootLoose View Post
    Dave, I thought it was necessary to get quite close (physically) to the subject in order to use a macro lens?
    All depends on the focal length of the lens Greg; the longer that is, the greater the focus distance (at which you get a particular 'magnification').

    From memory, I can shoot at a working distance of about a foot, maybe a bit less, which won't bother a bee.

    Cheers,

  7. #7

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    Re: Busy As ...

    Your image was taken at f7.1, and 100 mm focal length, and if the bee was 1 m from the camera the depth of field would be 2.44 cm. Drop that down to 30 cm to the bee and the DOF would be only 0.16 cm. Accurate focussing then becomes even more critical

  8. #8

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    Re: Busy As ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken MT View Post
    Your image was taken at f7.1, and 100 mm focal length, and if the bee was 1 m from the camera the depth of field would be 2.44 cm. Drop that down to 30 cm to the bee and the DOF would be only 0.16 cm. Accurate focussing then becomes even more critical
    Yeah, I was about 1m from it ... maybe 1.5m max. It wasn't possible to get any closer as the shrub is in a garden bed on top of a shoulder-high retaining wall.

    Ken, is there a quick way of calculating the depth-of -field? A rule of thumb, perhaps?

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