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Thread: DSLR Issue

  1. #1
    Slabstick's Avatar
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    DSLR Issue

    Hello,
    I'm new here and have been looking this site over. I like it. I have a question but not sure just exactly how to ask it. So, I'll just explain the issue I'm having and the question will reveal itself... I hope. I'm pretty new to the DSLR camera. I have no training. So, I must rely on self taught lessons, Internet, etc... Here's my issue. When I am out taking photos " mostly landscapes" I have a problem getting my lighting or exposure just right. I understand that Aperture is key as well as ISO, and shutter speed. When I set my Aperture to say around 4 "which on this particular lens" is as far as I can go. My ISO is at 100 or sometimes 200. Why is it that I can not set my camera to a very fast shutter speed. The faster I try to set it, I can see my exposure getting darker and darker as I move my shutter speed faster. This happens automatically. Is it supposed to since I am on "M"? I realize I can raise my ISO but doesn't that create noise? Maybe it has to do with my lens? I have the 58 mm lens that came with my camera. "Canon T3i 600D". I'll start with this and I'm sure ill have more questions. Thanks

  2. #2
    Administrator Manfred M's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    While exposure is a fairly complex subject, for any particular ISO (sensitivity) setting, there is a combination of aperture and shutter speed that gives you a correct exposure for the specific scene you are shooting. If you are shooting at a relatively low ISO of 100 or 200 and have the aperture wide open, there will only be one particlar shutter speed that your camera will use for the specific lighting conditions. In indoor situations photographers have another variable they can play with, the amount of light, which is where flash comes in. This will not generally work in landscape shots.

    Every time you want to double your shutter speed, you have to open up your aperture a full stop to get the same exposure. If you want a faster shutter speed, and your lens is already wide open, the only other variable you can change is to increase the ISO, to allow for a faster shutter speed. Doubling the ISO setting will let you double current shutter speed.

    You need to understand the "exposure triangle".

  3. #3

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    Re: DSLR Issue

    I am very new to the dslr also, if you havent had a chance to read the tutorials here then thats the first place I would direct you. That said when I shoot theoccasional landscape I usually find myself somewhere inbetween av 14-22 depending on brightness, I shoot as slow a speed as conditions allow, and as low an iso as conditions allow usually requiring a tripod. I am sure their are much more qualified people here to help you. welcome to cic . and check out the tutorials especially the one on exposure triangle.

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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Firstly, have you read the tutorials on this site, particularly this one?

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...a-exposure.htm

    If you are working in Aperture priority mode (Av) using a narrower aperture will darken the image and/or lower the shutter speed.

    Wide open apertures, say F4 for example, will let in most light but this can produce other problems such as a shorter area of sharp focus and slower shutter speed.

    Also, most lenses are a little less sharp when fully open.

    For landscape work, I would normally use F8 or F11 as typical examples. But it does depend on the actual lens and the scene that I am shooting.

    Narrower apertures can cause longer shutter speeds but using a tripod will overcome this potential problem; providing there aren't any issues with subject movement. For example, moving leaves or waves etc.

    Increasing the Iso is an option for producing a better balance between aperture and shutter speed. It is true that higher Iso settings can produce more noise but most of the time you can work at Iso 400 without any serious problems.

    Even going to Iso 800 shouldn't cause too much noise with modern cameras and lenses; but this does depend on the actual scene and darker conditions are usually the most problematic.

  5. #5
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    It sounds like you would be better of using some of the auto settings for a while and watch what settings the camera chooses which I assume can be seen in the viewfinder. Most cameras have a "auto" setting and one such as sports which will tend to push exposure speeds up.

    The brief answer to your question in manual is the metering in the viewfinder. As you increase the speed setting it will move in a negative direction and once past the central position it will under expose the shot. If away from the centre in the other direction it will over expose the shot. If you fix the aperture at something 4 in your case and increase the speed at some point the shot will be under exposed. The only thing that can allow a faster exposure when the meter is indicating the correct exposure is to increase the iso.

    From the question I suspect you should spend some time reading the manual that came with the camera. If it didn't come with one download it from the canon web site. There are also some tutorials on this site linked to at the top of the home page on a whole variety of subjects from simple to advanced.

    John
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Going to start from the botton first. You may not know it but that 58mm is a adapter that screw on to your lens in place of where the filter would go can't see why you have this or would need it, these are very cheap adapter like $10. See if you can un-screw it first it turns CCW. I bet you have the 18mm-55mm kit lens on that Canon.
    Last edited by Melkus; 6th January 2013 at 07:45 PM.

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    Slabstick's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Quote Originally Posted by Melkus View Post
    Going to start from the botton first. You may not know it but that 58mm is a adapter that screw on to your lens in place of where the filter would go can't see why you have this or would need it, these are very cheap adapter like $10. See if you can un-screw it first it turns CCW. I bet you have the 18mm-55mm kit lens on that Canon.
    Yeah your right, my mistake. It is a Polerized filter I purchased
    58mm. It is the 18mm X 55mm lens.

  8. #8
    Slabstick's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Quote Originally Posted by ajohnw View Post
    It sounds like you would be better of using some of the auto settings for a while and watch what settings the camera chooses which I assume can be seen in the viewfinder. Most cameras have a "auto" setting and one such as sports which will tend to push exposure speeds up.

    The brief answer to your question in manual is the metering in the viewfinder. As you increase the speed setting it will move in a negative direction and once past the central position it will under expose the shot. If away from the centre in the other direction it will over expose the shot. If you fix the aperture at something 4 in your case and increase the speed at some point the shot will be under exposed. The only thing that can allow a faster exposure when the meter is indicating the correct exposure is to increase the iso.

    From the question I suspect you should spend some time reading the manual that came with the camera. If it didn't come with one download it from the canon web site. There are also some tutorials on this site linked to at the top of the home page on a whole variety of subjects from simple to advanced.

    John
    -
    Thanks, any help is appreciated. I do however like to underexpos just a bit
    For Lr4 but not enough to lose any quality. I have read the manual
    With my camera some of it needs a bit more explanation. Like I said
    "learning curve" lol. I think what's so difficult for me to grasp is how the
    camera sets the appropriate setting automatically even though your in manual.
    Thanks for the feedback. I need it.

  9. #9
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Quote Originally Posted by Slabstick View Post
    It is a Polarising filter I purchased
    Have you put it on for a specific purpose?

    That isn't a filter I would recommend leaving on all the time, for one thing it will block about 2 stops of light, meaning you'll need to compensate for that. It increases your chances of under exposing.

    Could you do me a favour please?
    Could you Edit your Profile and put your first name in the Real Name field and where you are (roughly) in the Location field? - thanks.

    Welcome to the CiC forums from ...

  10. #10
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Quote Originally Posted by Slabstick View Post
    I think what's so difficult for me to grasp is how the camera sets the appropriate setting automatically even though your in manual.
    It won't (or shouldn't) - unless you have turned on something called Auto-ISO.

    That said, I'm not a Canon user, so there might be other things too.

  11. #11
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    What Dave is saying about that filter under exposing is what I was getting at and saying to take off for now. There no reason really to be using that. Set the lens to 18mm and the camera to Aperture priority (AV) set the ISO and f/stop depending on the light, say it's a nice sunny day, then I would set the ISO to 100 and a f/stop of say 16 if I'm doing landscape.

  12. #12
    Melkus's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Humphries View Post
    It won't (or shouldn't) - unless you have turned on something called Auto-ISO.

    That said, I'm not a Canon user, so there might be other things too.
    Dave is right if your in manual mode the camera should not be adjusting anything other than the ISO if it's set to Auto.

  13. #13
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Quote Originally Posted by Melkus View Post
    Dave is right if your in manual mode the camera should not be adjusting anything other than the ISO if it's set to Auto.
    This is correct, in Manual nothing should be changing, when you set Shutter speed / Aperture they should remain constant.
    John
    Last edited by JPS; 6th January 2013 at 11:34 PM.

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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Maybe I shouldn't comment, I am a newbie.
    When I recently went to DSLR, I used the auto settings for a while.

    Then when doing motorsports shots I use the S setting and let the camera do the rest.
    I am trying to get "speedshots" car in focus, spinning wheels and blurred backgound. (set on about 80)

    When I am doing landscapes I use the A setting, and let the camera do the rest.

    I am only starting to play with the M setting now.
    Without a lot of success at the moment.

  15. #15
    Slabstick's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Thanks Ill keep all that in mind. It's really good to get so much help.

  16. #16
    Slabstick's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Ok, thanks. So if you are indoors and have flash up or enabled the camera will allow a faster shutter speed?

  17. #17
    Slabstick's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Ok thank you, I will.

  18. #18
    Slabstick's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Humphries View Post
    Have you put it on for a specific purpose?

    That isn't a filter I would recommend leaving on all the time, for one thing it will block about 2 stops of light, meaning you'll need to compensate for that. It increases your chances of under exposing.

    Could you do me a favour please?
    Could you Edit your Profile and put your first name in the Real Name field and where you are (roughly) in the Location field? - thanks.

    Welcome to the CiC forums from ...
    Ok, I did. The filter is a Polarized filter that I have been reading about. I went to our local Camera supply and the man only confirmed that in lighter situations the filter will get deeper and richer color. I realize I shouldn't leave it on all the time. Is there a protective lens cover that I should buy? Like a UV cover?

  19. #19
    JPS's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Larry,
    Yes you are correct many people keep a UV filter on the lens to protect it.
    How are you finding the forum?
    John

  20. #20
    Slabstick's Avatar
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    Re: DSLR Issue

    Quote Originally Posted by Melkus View Post
    What Dave is saying about that filter under exposing is what I was getting at and saying to take off for now. There no reason really to be using that. Set the lens to 18mm and the camera to Aperture priority (AV) set the ISO and f/stop depending on the light, say it's a nice sunny day, then I would set the ISO to 100 and a f/stop of say 16 if I'm doing landscape.
    All helpful guys, thanks.

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