Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: The most ideal DSLR for:

  1. #1

    The most ideal DSLR for:

    Greetings,

    My name is Dustin, and I'm looking to purchase an SLR to take pictures of landscape, architecture, people, animals, and ideally all of things at night. Here is what I've learned:
    1.i might want something that offers complete control over shutter speed
    2.i want something that shoots greater then 3 frames per second
    3.i want something with a low compression setting so it will retain more quality
    4.obviously want a tripod for night shoots

    my price range is 400-1100, videos are not all that important (already considered the D5100)

    from what I see, the Nikon D3200 or the Canon rebel 3ti/4ti might be my best options. im still unsure and would appreciate some guidance as to what may be the best option.

    im new to photography, thanks for your help

  2. #2
    CP140's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Greater Vancouver Area
    Posts
    319
    Real Name
    Martin

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Welcome to the forum. Everyone has asked those very same questions and I'm sure you'll get some good advice here.

    The cameras you have suggested are very capable. You may wish to consider a couple others outside of the typical Canon/Nikon options.

    Pentax K30.
    Reviews here... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RMfSRpEASg and here... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGQsnxbBhmI would put it a bit above the Canons at a comparable price.

    My honest suggestion... go into your local camera store. Ask to see the Canon/Nikon you have mentioned. Hold them, play with the buttons, feel how they fit your hands. Ask them to mount the kit lens on each body. Feel how smooth/solid each combination feels.

    I did just that... and opted for a Pentax K-r. It felt better/more solid in my hands and the kit lens felt smoother and tighter. I've since upgraded to a Pentax K-30 and am very happy with it. The K-30 also has the advantage of being weather resistant.

    Ultimately, any camera in that price range is going to be a decent performer. Everybody here will have their own opinions/likes/dislikes and every camera has it's advantages and it's disadvantages. AS long as you have done your research, evaluated your needs and picked something that meets those needs, nobody can fault you for your choice. They may disagree with you, but that's OK.

    Let us all know what you decided on and why. Guaranteed there are a dozen others out there with the same questions.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    northern Virginia suburb of Washington, DC
    Posts
    19,064

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Consider purchasing a used camera or lens from a reputable provider that has a no-questions-asked return policy. You can reduce the cost of the model you decide upon or you can step up to a better model thanks to the lower cost of buying used equipment.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Western MA, USA
    Posts
    396
    Real Name
    Tom

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Quote Originally Posted by asilkybush View Post
    Greetings,

    My name is Dustin, and I'm looking to purchase an SLR to take pictures of landscape, architecture, people, animals, and ideally all of things at night. Here is what I've learned:
    1.i might want something that offers complete control over shutter speed
    2.i want something that shoots greater then 3 frames per second
    3.i want something with a low compression setting so it will retain more quality
    4.obviously want a tripod for night shoots

    my price range is 400-1100, videos are not all that important (already considered the D5100)

    from what I see, the Nikon D3200 or the Canon rebel 3ti/4ti might be my best options. im still unsure and would appreciate some guidance as to what may be the best option.
    I'm a Nikon shooter, so I can't offer any help wrt Canon options. First, one general point -- if you are talking about controlling the compression of the raw data, none of the low-end Nikons allow you any control over that. They always do a slightly lossy compression AIUI. If you are talking about control of JPEG compression, the answer is simple -- don't use JPEG if you care about image quality. Raw data (the format is called ".nef" with Nikons) is vastly superior to anything that JPEG can give you. The current Nikons, including the low-end Nikons, have 14 bits of real data per channel at 100 ISO. (BTW, the Canons allow you to save 14 bits, but have only 11.5 bits above the noise floor. This is the big advantage of Nikon over Canon. If you want to just shoot JPEG, buy Canon and get its richer feature set, because you won't be able to take advantage of the Nikon IQ advantage if you're shooting JPEG anyway.)

    I would be less than enthusiastic about the D3200 personally. There are some really big drawbacks to it. AIUI, the D3200 can only be triggered remotely by an IR controller. The D5100 has a cable release option, too. I generally prefer cable remotes for reliability, but here is another aspect that may matter more to you -- the cable release can be used as a "Bulb" shutter release, where you can latch it open for as long as you like. If you want star trails, this may be what you would want to use. AIUI, there is no such function with the IR remote.

    The D3200 lacks "delayed shutter release mode" if memory serves. This is the mirror lock-up option on low-end Nikons. What that does is bring the mirror up a second before the shutter is clicked, so the vibration from raising the mirror has time to dissipate when you are shooting from a tripod. The D5100 has delayed shutter mode.

    The D3200 does not support bracketed exposures, while the D5100 has that. What this means is that you can shoot a burst of three exposures at up to +/- 2 EV exposure bias. This is commonly used for HDR (which I find less useful now that the dynamic range of the Nikon is so good) and for when you are just hedging your bets on what the exposure of a difficult shot should be.

    The articulated display of the D5100 is something that you either love or hate. Personally, I have an articulated screen that I never articulate in practice, so it is only advantageous to me in that I can turn the LCD around for protection when the camera is not being used.

    The D3200 has a lot more pixels than the D5100, which can be useful for cropping an image in post. But the D5100 has a perfectly acceptable pixel density for most things. And it would require very good lenses and technique, indeed, to maintain the IQ at that resolution if you wanted to crop agressively. At least to my mind, that is the only potential plus of the D3200, and it is a mixed blessing.

    So, all-in-all, I would suggest that you seriously consider the D5100 over the D3200 if you decide to buy Nikon. FWIW
    Last edited by tclune; 27th December 2012 at 02:04 PM.

  5. #5
    Melkus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Fayetteville,NC
    Posts
    440
    Real Name
    Paul Melkus

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Any of the many entry level dslr out right now will do what your wanting, it's a matter of picking the one you feel the most comfortable with as far easy of use, how it feels in your hands etc. In all cases it's always best if you can find a store that has the one or ones your thinking so that you can look at them, play around with them etc.

  6. #6
    rpcrowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    13,391
    Real Name
    Richard

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    I would suggest that you get a used (or even refurbished) camera and use the cash left over to equip it with a top-line or close to top-line lens. IMO, a really good lens will provide better payback for your purchasing dollar that will a more expensive camera. I know that this is the case with Canon cameras and strongly suspect that it would also be true for Nikons.

    Although my 7D has video capability, that is not something that I would need in a DSLR camera. Opting out of video allows a wider choice of used cameras.

    Since I am a Canon guy, I cannot provide information on the Nikon line and I will not get into the Canon vs Nikon debate but, will simply say that either brand camera will capture very good imagery IF that camera is equipped with a very good to excellent lens. However, each camera has its bells and whistles which the inclusion of or lack of may or may not be important to you.

    Regarding Canon cameras; I would look into a Canon 40D or 40D as your basic camera. I shoot with both a 40D and a 7D with top-line Canon glass and previously shot with a 30D and 40D (also with top-line lenses).

    See my Yosemite Gallery and my China Galleries for examples of what a photographer can do with the older 30D and 40D cameras equipped with top-line lenses. I used Canon 17-55mm f/2.8IS and a 70-200mm f/4L IS lenses to shoot the images I have included within the galleries.

    http://rpcrowe.smugmug.com/

    Basically canon has three grades of 1.6x crop cameras (look up what is meant by this - there are lots of threads on the subject of crop cameras). There are two basic Rebel grades: the cameras with four digits before the D in their designator (xxxxD) are basic entry level cameras. I would advise against these if you want a camera that you can grow into. The three digit designator cameras (xxxD) such as the 600D (Canon also uses a T designator for the same cameras such as a T4i). These Rebel cameras are very capable of excellent imagery (again if you pair them with good glass).

    I personally prefer the 40D, 50D, 60D or 7D cameras, because they are slighly larger and fit my hands better but, mainly because I prefer the control system of these cameras. BTW: Don't get fooled into thinking that an "entry level" DSLR will be easier to to use that a more sophisticated DSLR. I "could" set up my sophisticated 7D to be as simple to use and as automated as the cheapest "entry level" camera.

    IMO, some of the absolute best values in DSLR cameras are either the Canon 40D or 50D. These cameras are relatively inexpensive so they will allow you to purchase a very good lens (or possibly pair of lenses) to pair with them. They do not have video capability but have other capablities which are lacking in the Rebel line of cameras.

    I would look into getting a used 40D or 50D camera and pairing it with a mid-range zoom that has a constant f/2.8 aperture such as the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 non-VC. I would stay away from extended range zoom lenses if you want top image quality combined with a fast f/stop and acurate autofocus. The extended range lenses just simply cannot compete with the mid-range zooms in those areas. The 17-50mm Tamron is a very good lens which is versatile and which can be used in a variety of venues.

    Purchasing a used 40D or 50D and a new Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 lens will leave you enough out of your high-side budget to buy a relatively decent tripod (most Manfrottos are good for their price).

    After the tripod, I would consider a hotshoe flash with through the lens auto exposure capability. I personally like Canon flashes and have purchased my last two (550EX and 430EX) on the used market and have been very satisfied with their capabilities. Bouncing your flash and using a modifier like the Joe Demb Flash Diffuser Pro or Classic (http://www.dembflashproducts.com/diffuser/) will provide very nice lighting.

    I used a 550EX on a Stroboframe camera flip bracket and bounced it off the ceiling modified with a Demb Flash Diffuser Pro for these shots...

    http://rpcrowe.smugmug.com/Portraits...0241&k=LXnFVZC

    If you need or want a longer lens, I suggest pairing your 17-50mm f/2.8 Tamron with a 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Tamron VC lens. However, a less expensive longer lens might be the Canon 55-250mm IS. Either of these lenses will produce very decent image quality.
    Last edited by rpcrowe; 27th December 2012 at 03:04 PM.

  7. #7

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    I went to a few places and tried out most of the cameras that I've been looking at, and a few of the higher end cameras as well. I could'nt find any place that has a no questions asked return policy, and buying a used camera is out of the question; ive just had to many friends get screwed buying used, especially when its something you plan to use a lot and for a long time.

    I looked at the D3200 and found the controls to be a little distasteful, i perfer less icons and straight to the point information when I'm taking a picture.

    since i live in a rainforest, because of the feel, menu layout, and lens choices (my friend / relatives carry pentax lenses) ive opted to purchase the pentax k30.

    thank you very much for all of your feed back, all of which was heavily considered.

  8. #8
    Melkus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Fayetteville,NC
    Posts
    440
    Real Name
    Paul Melkus

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    You will be very happy with that Pentax K30 I'm sure, did you also get the WS lens as well.

  9. #9
    Mito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Costa Blanca, Spain
    Posts
    223
    Real Name
    Brian

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    As a relative newcomer, I started out with a bridge camera. It has done me well and I still use it, mainly for close-ups. I then bought a Pentax K20D second-hand to learn the "trade" of taking photos. I am still learning and will for a long time to come. There is good advice above but remember that apart from the person behind the camera the thing that improves quality is a good lens and also practice. If you get stuck on technicalities ask here or read the exellent tutorials here. But most of all have fun and enjoy it.

  10. #10
    CP140's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Greater Vancouver Area
    Posts
    319
    Real Name
    Martin

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Quote Originally Posted by asilkybush View Post
    I went to a few places and tried out most of the cameras that I've been looking at, and a few of the higher end cameras as well. I could'nt find any place that has a no questions asked return policy, and buying a used camera is out of the question; ive just had to many friends get screwed buying used, especially when its something you plan to use a lot and for a long time.

    I looked at the D3200 and found the controls to be a little distasteful, i perfer less icons and straight to the point information when I'm taking a picture.

    since i live in a rainforest, because of the feel, menu layout, and lens choices (my friend / relatives carry pentax lenses) ive opted to purchase the pentax k30.

    thank you very much for all of your feed back, all of which was heavily considered.
    Congrats on the K-30. As I've mentioned, I'm quite happy with mine... it is a far more capable as a camera than I am as a photographer. Having said that, I'd be a close match for a 1980s vintage Polaroid...

    Being able to borrow/try a lens from family and friends is a definite plus.

  11. #11

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    thanks! heres what i watched that helped make up my mind

    http://www.youtube.com/results?searc....1._0DxpMSEiys

  12. #12
    CP140's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Greater Vancouver Area
    Posts
    319
    Real Name
    Martin

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Quote Originally Posted by asilkybush View Post
    thanks! heres what i watched that helped make up my mind

    http://www.youtube.com/results?searc....1._0DxpMSEiys
    I understand ! There's a reason the area I live in is called a "temperate rain forest"!

  13. #13
    jimd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Newport, South Wales, UK
    Posts
    23
    Real Name
    Jim

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Another Pentax user. Well done. We'll reach double figures soon

  14. #14
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lincolnshire, England
    Posts
    4
    Real Name
    Richard

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    One more here. Pentax K100d - K20d and K5 user.

  15. #15

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard A View Post
    One more here. Pentax K100d - K20d and K5 user.
    hey richard, which do you prefer and why?

  16. #16
    rawill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Southland - New Zealand
    Posts
    472
    Real Name
    Robin

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Quote Originally Posted by asilkybush View Post
    thanks! heres what i watched that helped make up my mind

    http://www.youtube.com/results?searc....1._0DxpMSEiys
    Ahh, but does it still take photos!

  17. #17

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Quote Originally Posted by rawill View Post
    Ahh, but does it still take photos!
    yes, thats half the fun of getting it wet

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    North East England
    Posts
    109
    Real Name
    George

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Me k110d,K-r,K30

  19. #19
    Mito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Costa Blanca, Spain
    Posts
    223
    Real Name
    Brian

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Quote Originally Posted by jimd View Post
    Another Pentax user. Well done. We'll reach double figures soon
    My Pentax has got double figures - 20

  20. #20
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lincolnshire, England
    Posts
    4
    Real Name
    Richard

    Re: The most ideal DSLR for:

    Hi silkybush,
    Bought a K100d with kit lens and Tamron 70-300 on Friday 13th 2007. Still have the invoice and every now and then look at it in disbelief. I had actually not realized it was Friday the 13th. I had no need to worry, the camera is still with me and works fine despite have done over 40,000 shots. Started doing photos at dog shows along with other things. This camera has earned me good money. Despite its basic status it is a splendid machine unless you need fast autofocus and fast buffering. I find that prints up to 14X11 come out very well.
    October 2009 purchased a K20d and the K100d became the backup machine. K20d was and still is a fabulous camera. I reckon the handling is in some ways better than the K5. Autofocus faster than K100d, resolution superb but ISO no better than K100d.
    This year I bought a K5 and sold the K20d, so the faithful K100d is still my second machine. In May I went off sick and camera work has taken a back seat. I am now getting my health back and taking pictures is once again a large part of my life. However, most of my stuff is for personal pleasure, not for customers.
    I am finding the K5 very, very special, it is a dream to use and the high ISO ability is amazing. Autofocus is on the mark and well quick enough for me. 7 frames per second, that is very fast if you need it.

    Regards, Richard.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •