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Thread: Dark beauty. Lost pixels?

  1. #1

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    Dark beauty. Lost pixels?

    One of my summer vacation photo. I would like your comments. I am not sure if it is too dark. I cropped about half. Someone said I lost too many pixels. Is there a way to keep the pixels when cropping? I use Lightroom 3.Dark beauty. Lost pixels?

  2. #2

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    Re: Dark beauty. Lost pixels?

    Possibly try increasing the highlights a fraction but retain some good shadows.

    What were the image sizes before and after cropping? You can always resize a photo upwards and add extra pixels. But if you go too far there is a risk of some image quality loss.

    I see you used a fairly high shutter speed here. Ideally, I would have reduced that a bit in favour of more focus depth.

  3. #3

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    Re: Dark beauty. Lost pixels?

    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff F View Post
    Possibly try increasing the highlights a fraction but retain some good shadows.

    What were the image sizes before and after cropping? You can always resize a photo upwards and add extra pixels. But if you go too far there is a risk of some image quality loss.

    I see you used a fairly high shutter speed here. Ideally, I would have reduced that a bit in favour of more focus depth.
    Geoff, the original size of the picture was 4272x2848, now 1900x2376. I also notice that now on Cambridge the center of the flower has lost some definition, would thet be the effect of the lost pixels? Also, can I find info here on resizing, ie a tutorial? I am a bit lost with all this mathematics.

  4. #4

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    Re: Dark beauty. Lost pixels?

    This article may help a little. http://www.imaging-resource.com/TIPS/PRINT1/PRINT1A.HTM

    And there are several articles on resizing in the CinC Tutorials; like this one http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...ze-for-web.htm

    Your image here is actually 546 pixels wide. How did you upload? Some methods get auto resized downwards.

    So if you have gone from 2848 pixels wide to 546 there is likely to be quite a bit of softening unless you re sharpened after resizing. I normally use Unsharp Mask around 60% and 0.4 pixels after a substantial downsize. Other people have slightly different settings but the principle remains the same.

    Some sources recommend using an auto resizing sharpen like Bicubic Sharpener but I found the results were often too little or too much. So I prefer to do it manually.

    Your mathematics only really matter when resizing for a specific print size. Otherwise it is just a case of working in actual dimensions like ins/mm or in pixels; depending on the purpose of resizing.
    Last edited by Geoff F; 2nd October 2012 at 09:31 PM. Reason: link added

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    Re: Dark beauty. Lost pixels?

    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff F View Post
    This article may help a little. http://www.imaging-resource.com/TIPS/PRINT1/PRINT1A.HTM

    And there are several articles on resizing in the CinC Tutorials; like this one http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...ze-for-web.htm

    Your image here is actually 546 pixels wide. How did you upload? Some methods get auto resized downwards.

    So if you have gone from 2848 pixels wide to 546 there is likely to be quite a bit of softening unless you re sharpened after resizing. I normally use Unsharp Mask around 60% and 0.4 pixels after a substantial downsize. Other people have slightly different settings but the principle remains the same.

    Some sources recommend using an auto resizing sharpen like Bicubic Sharpener but I found the results were often too little or too much. So I prefer to do it manually.

    Your mathematics only really matter when resizing for a specific print size. Otherwise it is just a case of working in actual dimensions like ins/mm or in pixels; depending on the purpose of resizing.
    Thank you Geoff, a lot of real good info, lots of reading to do. I will let try and apply these. Hopefully I will have some interesting results to show later.

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