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Thread: Looking through the lens

  1. #1
    Rowdy's Avatar
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    Looking through the lens

    Hello fellow enthusiasts, I have found when photographing someone they seem to be more relaxed
    when I use the LCD viewer and not the viewfinder. I think they can see your face and your not
    hidden behind the camera. Try it out and see what you think.

  2. #2
    Moderator GrumpyDiver's Avatar
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    Re: Looking through the lens

    I personally find that I can hold the camera a lot more steady if I take the classical shooting position. brace and use the viewfinder. Holding the camera so one can see the viewfinder puts the camera on what is essentially a long lever (your arms) and any minor motions are magnified. This compromises both the framing and the actual exposure.

    I find the only time I do use thescreen is when I am shooting off a tripod and even then I still line up using the viewfinder. If I am manually focusing, I will use the LCD screen to magnify the subject to get a sharp focus. The other instance that I use this technique is when I am using a fairly high density ND filter, and it is much more difficult to use the viewfinder to set up the shot.

  3. #3
    dubaiphil's Avatar
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    Re: Looking through the lens

    Yup - viewfinder for me

  4. #4
    Rowdy's Avatar
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    Re: Looking through the lens

    Quote Originally Posted by GrumpyDiver View Post
    I personally find that I can hold the camera a lot more steady if I take the classical shooting position. brace and use the viewfinder. Holding the camera so one can see the viewfinder puts the camera on what is essentially a long lever (your arms) and any minor motions are magnified. This compromises both the framing and the actual exposure.

    I find the only time I do use thescreen is when I am shooting off a tripod and even then I still line up using the viewfinder. If I am manually focusing, I will use the LCD screen to magnify the subject to get a sharp focus. The other instance that I use this technique is when I am using a fairly high density ND filter, and it is much more difficult to use the viewfinder to set up the shot.

  5. #5

    Re: Looking through the lens

    Hate the LCD. Can't shoot except through the VF.

  6. #6

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    Re: Looking through the lens

    Viewfinder here as well, except when I'd have to be a contorsionist to get at it (very low viewpoint for instance), then the orientable LCD is used

  7. #7

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    Re: Looking through the lens

    Always the viewfinder unless using the tripod. Wouldn't think of changing.

  8. #8
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    Re: Looking through the lens

    VF as well for me. I come from the film days when there wasn't a nice screen on the back of the camera. I am looking for a camera for street photography that I can slip into my pocket with a VF that doesn't cost the earth.

  9. #9
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: Looking through the lens

    I personally consider the LCD virtually useless as a viewfinder and I always use the eye level viewfinder. I would never purchase a camera without an eye level viewfinder and I use a right angle finder rather than the LCD when shooting in awkward positions.

    IMO, it is fairly difficult to spot things like a tree limb or a persons arm intruding into the edge of a frame when shooting with the 3 inch or so LCD at 12-24 inches from my face.

    I like being "INSIDE" the frame with only my image to concentrate on rather than "LOOKING" at my image with a load of distracting elements surrounding it; such as my hand, the camera body and everything in the background. I can also monitor my exposure parameters more easily when viewing with the eye level viewfinder. The f/stop, shutter speed, etc, appears relatively larger and brighter when using the eye level viewfinder.

    Additionally, bright light often makes LCD viewing difficult and following fast moving subjects with an LCD is difficult for me.

    However, these are just my own feelings. If you get good pictures it doesn't matter a tinkers damn how you are using your camera.

    I think however, that there are some photographers who have a difficult time translating the 3D image seen through the eye level viewfinder to a 2D image. The LCD has already done that translation. The photographer is viewing a 2D image on the LCD...
    Last edited by rpcrowe; 2nd October 2012 at 03:56 PM.

  10. #10

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    Re: Looking through the lens

    Quote Originally Posted by rpcrowe View Post
    I think however, that there are some photographers who have a difficult time translating the 3D image seen through the eye level viewfinder to a 2D image. The LCD has already done that translation. The photographer is viewing a 2D image on the LCD...
    If the camera has a mirror, the viewfinder is also displaying a 2D image.

  11. #11
    Cogito's Avatar
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    Two conflicting comments.

    I've had the opportunity to use both a Leica V-Lux4 and a Canon G1X. Both are without a doubt good image takers but the Canon VF was absolutely pathetic and unusable whilst the Leica didn't have a VF and the LCD was utterly unusable in bright sunlight.......
    I like a viewfinder.

  12. #12
    Glenn NK's Avatar
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    Re: Looking through the lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Rowdy View Post
    Hello fellow enthusiasts, I have found when photographing someone they seem to be more relaxed
    when I use the LCD viewer and not the viewfinder. I think they can see your face and your not
    hidden behind the camera. Try it out and see what you think.
    I've used this technique even before there were LCD's; compose in the VF (camera on tripod is best), and then look up to establish a connection (or rapport) with the subject(s). By not hiding behind the camera and using a remote I was able to talk to them, and get their undivided attention.

    It's all about eye contact - we humans communicate a lot of information with our eyes.

    And this communication goes both ways.

    Glenn

  13. #13
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    Re: Looking through the lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn NK View Post
    By not hiding behind the camera and using a remote I was able to talk to them, and get their undivided attention.

    It's all about eye contact - we humans communicate a lot of information with our eyes.

    And this communication goes both ways.

    Glenn
    I agree. With my film camera I had a 25 foot air cable release that worked wonderfully when taking quasi studio photos of my young nephew and niece. I still have the cable release but it lives in a box with everything else that doesn't work on my current camera.

  14. #14
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: Looking through the lens

    Another fix to the communication between photographer and subject is not to hide behind the camera. I usually can compose and shoot my shots quite quickly and then reestablish eye contact with the subject.

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