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Thread: confusion about buying cameras..

  1. #1

    confusion about buying cameras..

    i have a confusion .... i love to take photos... mainly of nature and wildlife.. so tell whether i should buy NIKON D100 OR D5100 OR NIKON P510 ...TELL ME GUYS

  2. #2

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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    well i have a 5100 and love it, takes great pics and i use it for virtually the same a you want inc landscapes etc, so it gets my vote

  3. #3
    Moderator GrumpyDiver's Avatar
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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    The D100 is an old (pushing 11 years now), obsolete DSLR. I would certainly not recommend buying it. The D5100 is a mid-range DSLR that will require additional lenses and the P510 is a cross-over camera.

    So the question comes down to your photographic experience, expectations and the amount of money you are willing to spend. THe D5100 will give you the highest level of capabilities for expansion, but you are going to have to figure in the cost of lenses. Wildlife photography does require long, and preferably fast lenses. Nature photography is a pretty wide ranging subject, from closeup shots of flowers to landscapes.

    I hope this helps to start claifying a few things.

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    Panama Hat & Camera's Avatar
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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    As Manfred said, the choice of camera depends on your experience, your expectations and how much money you're willing to spend. There is no way to compare the D5100 with the P510. The D5100 is a mid-range DSLR that will allow you to shoot in low light conditions that would be unthinkable for the P510. Additionally, the D5100 focuses much faster than the P510 and will allow you to take photographs with quality far superior to the P510. Additionally, you can expand it by purchasing lenses (which will be an additional cost, that can be very significant).
    I have a P510. It is a complete camera, but does not allow expansions. The P510 is a superzoom camera that is very nice to use and has the most versatile zoom lens available today (focal length = 24 to 1000 mm FFE).
    But again, there is no way compare the Nikon P510 with Nikon D5100 (they are in different categories of cameras).
    I hope I have helped you.
    Antonio.
    Last edited by Panama Hat & Camera; 25th September 2012 at 02:28 AM.

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    Otavio's Avatar
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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    Hi. Probably Manfred and Antonio summarised everything you need to know about P510 and D5100. Just would like to mention that I have a Kodak Z990 (similar category of P510 - Superzoom) and a Nikon D5100 and my summary of it all, based on my own experience, would be:
    1 - If you are more concerned on the Image quality side and are ok to spend with some lenses, go for the D5100.
    2 - If you just want to buy a versatile camera (no further expenses) and have fun with it, you might want to go for the P510.

    My 2 cents!!

  6. #6
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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    I have the Nikon D3100 (entry level DSLR that is lower in cost than the D5100) with about $2,000 worth of DSLR kit to go with it. I also have the Canon SX40 which is similar in capability to the P510 but with a slightly shorter zoom (840mm FFE). I shoot about half of my images with each. On my SmugMug account (link in my signature below) I identify which images are shot with each camera for comparison. Just for fun, see if you can determine which camera was used for any particular image before you check the make and model at the bottom of the associated text.

    If you are just starting out and have a limited budget, you may want to get a less expensive camera and work on your composition, technical shooting, and post processing skills. As you capability and budget grows, consider upgrading to a more professional DSLR. If you have the budget you might prefer to go straight to the DSLR. After all, how long will you need the training wheels? OK, to be fair, some of us longer than others. Obviously, I still have mine!

    One of the differences between a bridge camera and a DSLR is often the ability to shoot RAW images. The new Canon SX50 (upgrade to the Canon SX40) has both the RAW capability and the ability to zoom out to 1,200mm (Full Frame Equivalent) for those wildlife shots.
    Last edited by FrankMi; 26th September 2012 at 02:16 PM.

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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    Or you could look at the latest Panasonic GH3 where any lens you buy has extra reach of 2:1.5 ratio and ISO up with the leaders. The M4/3 sensor is 60% of the APS-C format and capable very satisfying results.

  8. #8

    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    You can not compare a P&S camera with DSLR. If you can raise your budget, you can go for Canon 7D or 650D. If you have to play with limited budget, then go for Canon SX50 HS. This will serve you a little as SLR. It is a Superzoom camera (50X) with RAW capability (a point which should not be neglected). Besides, it has got filter thread and hot shoe also (again very important). Great image stabilization nullifies almost all shakes and tremors while shooting with higher focal length.

  9. #9
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    I own a Canon 7D with a fair amount of top-line lenses and I love the combination...

    However, if I were trying to enter into digital photography at a lower cost, I would seriously consider the Canon SX50 HS. I don't know where you are located but, in the USA, the Canon SX50 HS runs $449 (US Dollars) from B&H in New York City. This is far less than half the price that you would spend to get a Canon or Nikon lens long enough for wildlife work. This is not even considering the price of the camera...

    I would expect that anywhere you purchase it, the Canon SX50 HS price would be in the same ballpark regarding a DSLR and set of lenses...

    I have never used the Canon SX50 HS but, I am seriously considering the addition of this camera to my setup. The Canon SX50 HS is relatively light in weight (as opposed to a DSLR setup) and has an equivalent focal range from 24mm to 1,200mm which is absolutely mind boggling. I would carry this camera virtually everywhere...

    There could possibly be some problems with this super zoom camera. The aperture when the zoom is extended is fairly small. However unless you get into the multi thousand dollar price range, it is doubtful that you will be able to find a lens of this focal length with a wider aperture. There "may" (like I said, I have never used the camera) be a shutter lag which would make some wildlife shots difficult. There "may" be a fairly slow focus (in comparison to a lens like the 400mm f/5.6L) which could make shooting birds in flight chancy. But, I am just bringing up possible scenarios; I have not used this camera...

    Some things which I consider very favorable about the Canon SX50 HS is that the camera incorporates an eye-level viewfinder and a hot-shoe mount. These factors are mandatory for any camera which I would consider. The Canon SX50 HS also has RAW capture capability. This is also one of the must haves for my choice in cameras...

    OTOH, if you would consider a Canon DSLR camera, the Canon 60D or 7D would be good ones to consider. One of the later Canon DSLR xxxD Rebel cameras would also be a decent choice. Canon has a pair of lenses which are great for wildlife photography. The aforementioned 400mm f/5.6L is arguably the best bird in flight lens on the market and the 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS lens is one of the best general purpose wildlife lenses available from any manufacturer...

    However, getting set up for wildlife work with vitually any brand DSLR camera; your expenditure would be five to six times what the Canon SX50 HS runs and would weigh far more...

    Image quality... Unless you ar considering some really large prints, the IQ from the Canon SX50 HS should be adequate for most uses...

    Note: The Canon SX 50HS runs $429 fro Costco a U.S. membership warehouse store...
    http://m.costco.com/Canon-Powershot-...&storeId=10301
    Last edited by rpcrowe; 8th November 2012 at 05:13 PM.

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    Melkus's Avatar
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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    You have a camera store near by, if so that is where you need to start. If they have what you want in stock take a look at it, pick it up dose it feel right in your hands, are the controls lay out so as you can changes settings without much trouble getting to them. In all cases you have to ask your self what are my needs and expectations.

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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    If you are serious about your hobby as a photographer and want to expand your skills not using the Auto settings on your camera, go for a model that will accept external lenses. The 5100 would be an excellent choice. It has just enough features to allow you to become experienced with the features of a good DSLR, how different focal distances effect your images and how camera settings can help get a variety of "looks" to your images in a variety of light, and also the use of in camera and external flash equipment. Getting cameras that have recently been built gives you many innovations and sensor quality that might not be in older models. Later, as you become more advanced in your skills, you can look at more expensive cameras that give you more settings or 'bells and whistles' that you know you would like to have in your camera. As your camera knowledge and composition skills improve, you most likely will start to look for new more expensive lenses rather than a new camera. In short, I expect you will be pleased with the 5100 for several years.

  12. #12

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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    There is one thing about the P510 if it is similar to the P310 is the way the lens looses light as it zooms. In the desire to make a compact camera that is the result. You could be better, if your finances reach that way, of looking at the Panasonic FZ200 which has less reach, though there is not that much difference between x24 and x42 in practice, but has a constant lens. I gather that people have added tele adaptors to the FZ200 which could turn the x24 into x48 though probably with some loss of light. My Pansonic bridge camera is x12 or 430 and with my Raynox 2020 [ x2.2 ] that gives me 950mm AoV which is pretty close to what Nikon are offering us. Constant means that the light gathering power the lens has when at wide angle is maintained throughout the zoom, which could be very handy if photographing wild life in dark foliage.

    Buy a DSLR and you will firstly always be wondering what additional lens you 'need', and the horrible expense of any such lens.
    With a bridge camera for natural history I suggest the only additional thing you will need is a moderate close-up lens to enable you to fill the sensor with images of small things using the zoom to achieve tight framing rather than getting in close to the little beasties. If you have millions then you can afford and likely would get the DSLR and the very expensive long lenses but for the rest of us with limited funds the bridge camera or M4/3 is the answer.

    I think and do compare the bridge camera with the DSLR and the latter becuase of its larger sensor size makes IQ easier to obtain but it is not my choice of tool. Note the word 'tool'. My compromise after several years with bridge cameras is M4/3 and a x10 zoom, but that is probably beyond your budget I suspect.
    Last edited by jcuknz; 8th November 2012 at 06:48 PM.

  13. #13
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    Hi jc,

    Well I am surprised, I never knew there was a bridge camera with a constant lens an f/2.8 600mm FFE is pretty impressive on the Pany FZ200.

    I do curse the ramping on the small lens S100, which runs to f/5.9 at a lowly 120mm FFE, but then it fits in my pocket - can't have everything

    The P510 is f/5.9 at 1000mm, but to put that in context, most affordable DSLR lens will be f/5.6 when zoomed in to 450mm FFE.

    I am becoming very frustrated/disatisfied with the AF performance on my P510 (worse than a P&S), so I actually don't recommend it, try an SX50HS (for 1200mm FFE) or FZ200 (for 600mm FFE).

    Cheers,

  14. #14

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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    Yes Dave
    Panasonic has returned to how they organised the FZ20 which was also f/2.8 constant and where I started with Panasonic. But they were a bit slow in getting there for something I've been agitating for on blogs for some years now when the subject came up and I have moved to M4/3 .... the other thing was a larger sensor and now with M4/3 I have that but sadly the lens is only f/4-f/5.8 and only x10 zoom from a wide of 28mm AoV which gives 280 AoV at Tele end.

    Without having seen an FZ200 I am assuming that sadly the lens trombones as it zooms ... my other reason for sticking with my FZ50 until I changed to M4/3....Models following the FZ50 had serious losses with zooming, tromboned and still had the small P&S sensor. With M4/3 the larger sensor compensates for the light losses and I'm tolerating the trombone

    Now if they would organise a similar lens for M4/3 we will be cooking I am sure it is possible, but sadly all the talk is about primes which don't interest me. I want a large sensor bridge camera, with interchangeable lens just in case I want to do big close-up stuff. with tubes and/or bellows.

    Even the FZ30 and FZ50 do not loose light like most bridge camera with f/2.8-f3.2 though in that respect they were a dissapointment when I got them.
    Last edited by jcuknz; 9th November 2012 at 07:23 AM.

  15. #15
    ajohnw's Avatar
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    Re: confusion about buying cameras..

    A lot of this really depends on what you intend to do with the shots after you have taken them as well as budget and practicalities.

    Sensor size does have it's problems. A 1000mm equivalent lens on an aps camera is not the sort of thing that is easy to carry around. On the other hand it will capture far more real detail than any of the super zoom 1000mm or more equivalent cameras mentioned. For web use this isn't really a problem as the resolution of a PC screen is relatively low. It would be possible to crop a 4000mm equivalent view at least out of the aps camera. Try that on the tiny sensor cameras and you will probably see that the resolution isn't really there. I say probably because I have no intention of buying one to find out as physics comes into the limitations not quality of the camera. I might buy one for small prints and web shots and also because it would be very easy to carry around.

    Both 4/3 and micro 4/3 are interesting but as I am using one I do know that in terms of dynamic range they don't match up to entry level dslr's and some cost rather a lot more. Due to this many shots are likely to need more processing for decent results. Low light focusing isn't too good and manual focusing has it's problems as well. Actually taking Pen's as an example the more expensive e-p3 has more chance of focusing correctly in marginal situations than the e-pl1. They use the same basic hardware as well. I don't know if panasonic do the same sort of thing but they do use the same hardware. The longest sensible zoom to use on either make of camera is the panasonic 100-300mm zoom which takes things up to 600mm equivalent which should easily crop to over 1000mm equivalent. A lot longer for web shots. I do intend to buy one of those and hope it's optical quality is up to it. Olympus tend to be better in that area but given the need to manually focus at times the built in image stability in the Panasonic lenses is essential.. The advantage of m 4/3 is that it's fairly easy to carry a range of lenses about in a shoulder bag with a decent weight saving over aps especially in olympus's case. It's a pity pansonic lenses are both bigger and heavier.

    On super zooms it's worth mentioning that there aren't any free lunches in this area. Zoom up to a range of 3:1 and maybe 4:1 tend to be nearly up to prime lens standards. I understand video cameras are having problems in this area now they need to shoot HD video. If you want to know what a really good zoom for that costs go price up a broadcast quality TV zoom lens and bear in mind that these are only producing 2mp images. Actually my most recent sony compact has better optics than the previous one - probably to obtain decent HD video. In the past I have compared my latest compact with an early 2mp digital ixus, In terms of the actual detail that is really captured it wins. I might not now but only just.

    There are a range of what tend to be called compact system cameras available from several makers. The m 4/3 's win on sensor size but in my view still fall into that category. I have a feeling that Sony will bring out something with a bigger than most but smaller than the 4/3 camera in this category at some point. It might turn out to be the best camera as well. There are myriads of adapters to allow manual focus lenses to be fitted to m 4/3 cameras. This looks to be ideal for longer focal lengths but a tripod is needed really for focusing them. The lenses are also large as usually intended for 35mm. They lack image stability which isn't a problem on a Pen as the IS is built in but I can tell you with some certainty that focusing them on a Pen really is a problem. Olympus could easily do something about that by allowing auto focus confirm to work when manual lenses are on the camera. Silly of them not to really in my view as lots of people would buy them if they did. As they are they are really just a fair step up from a compact. More so than others but probably not as much so as Nex. The Nex suffers from a more limited range of lenses which have to work with an aps sensor. The lenses are basically much bulkier than the body.

    Hope this helps you make your mind up. Personally I wouldn't be too concerned about buying an entry level dslr. These can take excellent photo's and tend to be a bit of a bargain. I'm toying with the idea of upgrading my 300D and can't really see any point in buying anything over Canon's cheapest dslr. I may see something that steers me to the more expensive models but so far I haven't. My 5D is an entirely different kettle of fish but in real terms few photographic situations really justify using it.

    -
    Last edited by ajohnw; 9th November 2012 at 10:26 AM.

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