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Thread: Ghost boy - c & c wanted.

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    Mustang Oklahoma
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    Ron Lane

    Ghost boy - c & c wanted.

    I took this picture this evening and wasn't expecting this. Shot in manual mode with shutter speed 5, aperture 7.1, ISO 100, EF-S55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II, focal length 55.0mm.

    Comments are welcome.

    Ghost boy - c & c wanted.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Chicago, IL, USA
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    Gretchen

    Re: Ghost boy - c & c wanted.

    This could inspire a Sci-Fi Short story! His eyes are still totally visible! Very, very interesting. I have no idea how it happened, but I really like it!

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    Mustang Oklahoma
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    Ron Lane

    Re: Ghost boy - c & c wanted.

    Thanks Gretchen. He was sitting up like that when I clicked the shutter and then he moved during the shot. I was expecting a blurry blob, but was pleasantly surprised by this.

  4. #4
    FrankMi's Avatar
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    May 2011
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    Fort Mill, South Carolina, USA
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    Frank Miller

    Re: Ghost boy - c & c wanted.

    Hi Ron, ghosting can be an issue any time you have a shutter speed that is long enough for the subject to move. In this case you likely got 1-2 seconds of him in that location and the remaining 3-4 seconds of just the scene behind him.

    This technique can be very useful when shooting a tourist scene. The faster they move and the longer the shutter remains open, the less of the tourist you see and the more of the subject behind them is visible. If the tourist/auto/moving object is fast enough you get only the subject behind them and not the moving object.

  5. #5
    speedneeder's Avatar
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    Nov 2010
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    Owensboro, KY
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    Brian

    Re: Ghost boy - c & c wanted.

    If you are interested in doing more of this - one way you can have control over how much 'ghosting' you have to create multiple images. One could be just everything but the child, then overlay an image of the child on a layer (assuming you have photoshop or something to do this), and then you can change the layer opacity to suit exactly how much ghosting you are going for.

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