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Thread: protect your gear - camera bags, etc

  1. #1

    protect your gear - camera bags, etc

    hi , i have recently bought a second hand lowepro slingshot aw 200 camera bag, and i love it. these bags are easy to use , low weight from them self, very flexible

    so spend a few dollars , pounds, euros on a bag of them or buy a different brand camara bag but i urge every on tp protect the gear it is more than woth it !
    Last edited by Dirk; 9th August 2009 at 05:56 AM. Reason: typo

  2. #2

    Re: protect your gear

    protect your gear - camera bags, etc

    here you see the bag with in it : canon eos 300D+18-55IS, tammy 28-200 nikn on mount, canon 24-85 usm gofdinger, nikon 18-70 dx ed , 18-55 nikon vr , the d70 body is in the top compartiment

    so enough space for me

  3. #3

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    Re: protect your gear

    I use a Lowepro Nova 5 AW myself, picked it up s/h as new for half new price. It's big enough to be practical and has an all weather cover.

    Bags are like kitchen cupboards, if they're big you will find something to put in them, usually something that you don't need.

  4. #4

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    Re: protect your gear

    Can anyone recommend a camera gear back-packs with the possibility to also hold a tripod, by chance? (On the exterior)

    I do a lot of hiking, and I'm not much of a fan of the shoulder strap bags.

  5. #5
    Moderator Dave Humphries's Avatar
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    Re: protect your gear

    Sorry Sean, this doesn't answer your question.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill44 View Post
    Bags are like kitchen cupboards, if they're big you will find something to put in them, usually something that you don't need.
    I know what you mean Bill, but I think you can go too minimalist - like I have

    My small Lowepro bag fits the camera with my one lens attached, spare batt, 72mm CPL, rocket blower, memory cards, etc. but it leaves no space for bottle(s) of water, snack bar, etc. so if I am wearing trousers with limited pocket room and intend to be out for >4 hours .... I end up with another bag or a jacket I don't need in summer.

    Cheers,

  6. #6

    Re: protect your gear

    if you have a unomat sv 800 it comes with a bag and when you put special tape on the bag as wel on the trpod bag you can stick it on and have it with you too

  7. #7

    Re: protect your gear

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    Can anyone recommend a camera gear back-packs with the possibility to also hold a tripod, by chance? (On the exterior)

    I do a lot of hiking, and I'm not much of a fan of the shoulder strap bags.
    When I want to take my tripod, I use a LowePro MiniTrekker AW. I can pack in an amazing amount of kit, considering the overall size, but it wouldn't suit if you want to pack additional clothing or much in the way of supplies beyond a bottle of water.

    A site I found very useful when looking for a new bag is Cambags.com because you can see pics of real life use.

  8. #8

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    Re: protect your gear

    This was discussed in depth here Camera Bag and sensor cleaning products/solutions

    My Lowenpro Mini Trekker is sufficient for my Canon 40D with 150-500 lens plus 180 macro and still has room for a lightweight jacket and a selection of other essentials. There is a tripod attachment on the outside which works fine; but make sure the elastic straps are really tight and wedged under a lip on the tripod so it can't slip through.

    I carry this along cliff tops and through the woods with no problems. A strong well designed and comfortable piece of kit even when full of heavy gear.

  9. #9

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    Re: protect your gear

    Quote Originally Posted by GillR View Post
    When I want to take my tripod, I use a LowePro MiniTrekker AW. I can pack in an amazing amount of kit, considering the overall size, but it wouldn't suit if you want to pack additional clothing or much in the way of supplies beyond a bottle of water.

    A site I found very useful when looking for a new bag is Cambags.com because you can see pics of real life use.
    Thanks GillR,

    That's exactly what I'm looking for, actually. As for carrying other supplies that's no problem - I'm used to carrying an extra pack and/or convincing one of my friends to become a pack mule.

    I'll be sure to look at that site, thanks for the link.

  10. #10

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    Re: protect your gear

    Out of interest, I adopted a "multi-tier" approach to gear bags ...

    I have 3 LowePro general bags (camera, lenses, filters), and a big builders toolbag for general stuff (batteries / cables / flashes etc). When I need more portability I just throw as many of the general bags into a trampers pack - strap on my tripod - and away I go

  11. #11
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    I'll second the Mini-Trekker

    Quote Originally Posted by GillR View Post
    When I want to take my tripod, I use a LowePro MiniTrekker AW. I can pack in an amazing amount of kit, considering the overall size, but it wouldn't suit if you want to pack additional clothing or much in the way of supplies beyond a bottle of water.

    A site I found very useful when looking for a new bag is Cambags.com because you can see pics of real life use.
    I have a Mini-Trekker and it is, IMO, one of the best backpack type camera cases when you consider all the parameters of a backpack: ease of use, decent (but, not gigantic) size, weight, protection of gear and, of course, price. The Mini-Trekker can accept a tripod or a monopod strapped onto its side.

    Although a backpack is "decent" for transporting gear, I don't like shooting with it. It is not handy to have your gear on your back when shooting and it is also somewhat chancy to carry your gear that way in crowds. It is easy for someone to rip off your gear without you realizing it. There are however, backpacks which cannot be opened from the back. But, I would imagine that they are even more inconvenient to shoot with than regular backpacks.

    I tend to shoot with two 1.6x cameras and two lenses: 17-55mm f/2.8 IS and 70-200mm f/4L IS. This is a very convenient focal range to have at my finger tips. I carry the 17-55mm camera/lens around my neck on a neoprene strap and the 70-200mm camera/lens in an TAMRAC Zoom-19 Holster Case at my left hip. I use a hand strap on that camera and have substituted a round, screw-in, lens hood and an OPTECH Hood Hat for the OEM hood and lens cap. I can get that camera/lens into action faster than I can tell you how I do it. I occasionally carry a 12-24mm Tokina f/4 lens in a soft pouch within a pocket of my shooting vest.

    My wife has sewn VELCRO strips across the left shoulder of my shooting vest to keep the strap of the Zoom-19 case in place and a VELCRO strip at the left side of my shooting vest and a corresponding strip on the Zoom-19 case. These strips keep my case from swinging around as I move.

    I always carry a pair of OPTECH Rain Sleeves to protect my cameras/lenses from rain and blowing dust. These sleeves weigh next-to-nothing and are very inexpensive (about $7.00 per pair). If I am going out in inclement weather, I will also carry an old small 600 (series) Tamrac shoulder bag for the camera with the short lens.

    I am planning a 15-day trip to China in March of next year. This trip will include at least six cities with air travel between the cities. I wanted a a pair of rolling cases. One for my clothing and other travel necessities and one for my camera gear. I was tempted to use a luggage roller and my Mini-Trekker to store my gear and to carry it from hotel to plane to new hotel. However, I wanted something more convenient. I was tossed up between a Mini-Trekker with wheels and a wheeled backpack that is sold on eBay for $50 (USD).

    Checking the carry on limits of China Air, I found that the eBay bag exceeded those limits. The Mini-Trekker was within the limits but, the backpack straps were heavy and bulky. Since I was not planning to carry this bag over rough terrain, I didn't need straps. Additionally, due to the shape of a backpack which becomes narrow towards the top, you are losing out on space.

    I decided on the Lowepro Roller Mini Portable Hard Case for camera storage during the trip and for moving between hotels and airplanes. I will have two international plane trips and seven plane trips within China on this whirlwind tour.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Lowepro-Pro-Roll...d=p3286.c0.m14

    This case can accept a tripod or monopod on its side but, I will transport ny travel tripod and monopod inside my checked-on suitcase (which is also a roller type case). The Lowepro case with tripod attached would exceed the size restrictions for carry on bags with China Air and I have had problems in the past attempting to carry a monopod aboard a plane. It was declared a "weapon like object". Airports and airlines vary regarding monopods but, it is easier and safer to check them in.

    I have enough room inside the Lowepro to carry the Zoom-19 Holster Case as well as the small, light, TAMRAC 603 case.

    Best of all, I was able to get this bag, as a demonstration model, in perfect shape for $100 (USD) at B&H Camera of New York City.

  12. #12

    Re: I'll second the Mini-Trekker

    my bag only did cost me 35 euro not bad for a almost new bag..

  13. #13

    Re: protect your gear

    I use a large National Geographic branded bag (pretentious). Nicely padded waterproof inner section for the camera plus my 28-200 lens attached (including hood). I can fit my flash to the side with its bracket and cord. Plenty of room on the other side for a couple more lenses. A flat compartment at inside back for the 32" reflector and another zipped magazine pouch at the outside back. Two large zip pockets at the front which could fit a couple of smaller primes and a couple of velcro flapped pockets on the outer weather flap ideal for filters etc. The inner is ripstop nylon and the out is all natural canvas and hemp. Plently of velcro straps to back and sides and a couple of straps at the top which my monopod slides through. This bag has the natural look so not much use for the city slicker but the upside of the rather army surplus look is that it is not immediately obvious that it is a camera bag.

    protect your gear - camera bags, etc

    Oh forgot to add it accompanies a Barbour Norfolk Jacket which itself has very large waterproof pockets including the large poachers pocket on the inside. Need to watch for the camera gear bashing against the folding 410 and the rabbit fur plays havoc with the USM. ( I jest...I gave up the 410 years ago)
    Last edited by Wirefox; 17th August 2009 at 07:24 PM.

  14. #14

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    Re: protect your gear

    About gear protection - are lens coats worth it? They aren't that expensive (for a canon 70-200mm F2.8 IS it's roughly $90.) and I'm wondering if it's worth buying them as a kit through B&H.

    Only down side I see to them is they cover up that beautiful red ring at the end of the lens.

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    Re: protect your gear

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    About gear protection - are lens coats worth it? They aren't that expensive (for a canon 70-200mm F2.8 IS it's roughly $90.) and I'm wondering if it's worth buying them as a kit through B&H.

    Only down side I see to them is they cover up that beautiful red ring at the end of the lens.
    I haven't personally ever felt a burning need to use one. I understand that the camoflage ones are good value on longer lenses when bird shooting though.

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