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Thread: Bellows with Canon DSLR camera

  1. #1
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Bellows with Canon DSLR camera

    I have just found an old Takumar M42 35mm lens that was used on one of the original Pentax screw mount SLR cameras.

    I am thinking about getting a cheap bellows unit which will fit my various 1.6x crop cameras and a M42 adapter.

    This Takumar lens has either a semi-automatic or manual bellows which will solve the problem of no electrical connection between the lens and the camera body. Focus wide open and then stop down to shoot.

    The bellows and adapter will cost in the area of $50 USD total and I already have the lens.

    Since I already have a 90mm f/2.8 Tamron Macro lens, the bellows unit will be used only seldom and mainly for fun.

    Does this sound like it will work?

  2. #2
    William W's Avatar
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    Re: Bellows with Canon DSLR camera

    Yes, sure does.

    Depending upon what bellows you get: be aware of the risk of the camera's mirror hitting the back of the adapter or the back of the bellows - but that can be avoided by using an extension tube between camera and the adapter (or the bellows). A 12mm tube is probably enough for any combination to make the mirror safe.

    WW
    Last edited by William W; 16th June 2012 at 08:00 AM. Reason: added info

  3. #3

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    Re: Bellows with Canon DSLR camera

    It will work for large magnification, if you also get a reverse adapter to turn the lens end for end. A 35 mm lens for SLR is of retrofocus design, which implies that when you use it at a large distance from the sensor, it will focus very close to the front element, or in worst case even inside the lens, when pointing forward as usual. Turned around however, with a reversal ring, it will be OK for larger than life imaging, with a working distance from the rear of the lens of about 2".

    If the lens does not have a stopped down "M" control, you will then need to stop it down with some trickery. In the past, there were rings to attach to the mount that accomplished stopping down, but I believe it can be done by simple means, as for example a bracket that is pinched in the mount and bent in the end to press the plunger at the back of the lens.

  4. #4

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    Re: Bellows with Canon DSLR camera

    I am certainly no expert in bellows use but it seems to me that the bellows, in addition to determining magnification, also plays a large part in the focusing as well. In-camera metering and shutter operation is all within the camera body and the shutter will be set to accomodate the aperture of the lens. The only limiting factor is focusing with a wide open lens and then stopping down for exposure....which could be done on the lens itself. Slow, but it would certainly work. As previously pointed out the first concern is mating the bellows to the camera body so as not to obstruct the mirror function. I realize I've not gone into great detail, but does this make sesnse......

  5. #5

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    Re: Bellows with Canon DSLR camera

    I am wondering about that 35mm Takumar becuase with mine I have a lever and would think is quite awkward to work[ why I rarely used it with my Pentax SLR ] , whereas with the 50mm/135mm there is a slider which stays in position. The 35mm is also rather slow being an f/3.5?

    However your question is should you buy the bellows ... and I'd say yes becuase it would help the Tamron to focus closer than it already does, assuming one can sort out the mounting to suit camera and lens I guess probably both ends of the bellows will be the same so you would not need an adaptor ring like the Takumar will.

    Unless your subject matter is back-lit I would prefer to use the 90mm to keep away from the subject while still getting the tight framing. It makes it easier to light the subject if the camera is not 'on top' of the item.

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