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Thread: Canon Question

  1. #1

    Canon Question

    I have found a really good deal on a Canon 7D...brand new great price (I've been comparing).

    We have an old Canon film camera that has a couple lenses, but I am wondering if those old lenses will work with full function on the new body?

    The film camera was new in about 1978

  2. #2
    Moderator GrumpyDiver's Avatar
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    Re: Canon Question

    I'm not a Canon user, but I believe they changed to the EF lens mount in 1987. I suspect the lenses you have are the incompatible FD mount.

  3. #3

    Re: Canon Question

    I think I settled on a 7D but looks like I will have to buy a bunch of lenses too.

    I found a body for a really good price, but those lenses are freakin' expensive.

    If I go buy some used EOS lenses how should I 'judge' them? What would the criteria be for a used lens?

    I am not talking about a book length tutorial on focal length and crop factor but rather what are some things to watch out for?

  4. #4
    William W's Avatar
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    Re: Canon Question

    Quote Originally Posted by alamo5000 View Post
    I have found a really good deal on a Canon 7D... We have an old Canon film camera that has a couple lenses, but I am wondering if those old lenses will work with full function on the new body? The film camera was new in about 1978
    The Canon AE-1 was introduced in April 1976.
    When the AE-1 came out the Canon FTb and FTb-N were also in the mainstream in the 35mm SLR market. All these cameras are F Mount and these F mount lenses will NOT be (easily) suitable for your EOS 7D.
    In March 1987 the EOS 650 was Canon's first EOS camera, with the new EF Mount lenses.

    Quote Originally Posted by alamo5000 View Post
    I think I settled on a 7D but looks like I will have to buy a bunch of lenses too. If I go buy some used EOS lenses how should I 'judge' them? What would the criteria be for a used lens? I am not talking about a book length tutorial on focal length and crop factor but rather what are some things to watch out for?
    My main criterion for a used lens is to see through the lens and there to be no fungus or large mess inside it and then to shake it and there be no rattles: then I take several pictures with it in various lighting conditions and at various apertures (and FL if a zoom) and critically view them on a laptop.

    Obviously this method might not be suitable for gear bought on the internet, but I don’t buy second hand lenses over the net, but rather in person – and I have only tended to buy specialty lenses second hand.

    Dents are something I notice and avoid, but wear marks is not a problem for me.

    Age of the lens is something I consider as spare parts become more problematic.

    Have you considered the EF-S “kit” lenses (18 to 55IS and 55 to 250IS) – there are really not very expensive, if bought new.

    Also, buying second hand or reconditioned from a store usually comes with a warrantee.

    WW

  5. #5

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    Re: Canon Question

    Quote Originally Posted by alamo5000 View Post
    I have found a really good deal on a Canon 7D...brand new great price (I've been comparing).
    Just make sure that the supplier is both legit and reputable. There are a LOT of rip-off merchants out there ...

    http://www.resellerratings.com/store/Sonic_Cameras

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    inkista's Avatar
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    Re: Canon Question

    For the Canon FD/FL lenses, the only mounts you're liable to want to look at that can easily use those lenses with adapter rings are going to be the mirrorless compact mounts like Olympus & Panasonic micro four-thirds and Sony NEX. And the usage is limited: no autofocus, no aperture control from the camera, and stop-down metering.

    Folks who adapt manual focus lenses are an eccentric and contrary lot. It's typically just easier to buy a lens in the native mount to use instead, because autofocus is a nice nice thing to have, and a kit lens or a 50/1.8 prime (the most common lenses) are dirt cheap in comparison with most lenses. Unless your older Canon lenses are pro-level L lenses, it's probably not worth it to try adapting them.

    Bill, not sure I'd refer to Canon FD or FL as "F mount"; that term is more commonly used to describe the still-current Nikon F mount.

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    William W's Avatar
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    Re: Canon Question

    Quote Originally Posted by inkista View Post
    Bill, not sure I'd refer to Canon FD or FL as "F mount"; that term is more commonly used to describe the still-current Nikon F mount.
    Yes, thanks.
    It was actually a typo and also an error of omission on my behalf:
    I was thinking AE-1 is FD mount with auto aperture metering; and is FL mount with stopped down aperture metering.

    I meant to explain that difference and the probability that the OPs lenses were either FD or FL and my fingers just typed F mount and I forgot to include the rest of the explanation!

    Thanks again,

    WW

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