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Thread: The black wall and a tree with history

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    New Member Kchen's Avatar
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    The black wall and a tree with history

    The black wall and a tree with history

    These are remembrances left at the black wall in Auschwitz, where prisoners were executed by gun.


    The black wall and a tree with history

    Shot of a tree I liked, located in the jewish cemetery in Oswiecim. This is my first panorama and I didn't follow any tutorial (I'm experienced with PS).

    I'm still a beginner so any tips are appreciated a huge lot!

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    Re: The black wall and a tree with history

    Chang,
    With all my respects, first picture I don't get it, no matter how much I try.
    I do "like" the second one, with the wide angle lens ( I''m fan of it), but god forgive me, I do not see where is the history. I do believet hat "history" might be in the "lower" part of the three, from focus point of view (F16-F22 like)

    hope it helps,
    Leo

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    Re: The black wall and a tree with history

    With the first one, Chang, I wonder if cropping tighter on the right side and ending up with just three lamps and an image ratio of around 5 x 4 might have more impact.

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    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: The black wall and a tree with history

    With both these images, Chang, you have sought to tell a very moving story.

    For me the thing that is missing is context. If you had not told us that the first picture was the Death Wall in Auschwitz 1, people, apart from maybe those who have been there, could not have guessed that this was the location. Similarly, we cannot tell that the second image is taken in one of the cemeteries.

    So, the point I am making is - When we take a photograph, we are at the scene. We are experiencing the emotion that goes with location and the moment (I have been in the places that you have photographed and can testify to the overwhelming emotional experience). But the challenge facing us as photographers is then to convey that in a picture.

    The person viewing your picture will not have been there with you. They do not know what the mood and atmosphere is like. You have to try and capture that in a photograph. So, you have to provide the context; a visual story that the viewer can understand.

    I did not take any pictures when I visited Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II (Birkenau), but I think if I did of the Death Wall, then it needs to show the situation. For example, I think it would need most of the wall and the barrack blocks that line each side showing in the frame. The close-up shows us detail of what lies at the foot of the wall, but does not tell us of the horror of that place.
    Last edited by Donald; 10th April 2012 at 08:32 PM.

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    New Member Kchen's Avatar
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    Re: The black wall and a tree with history

    Quote Originally Posted by LeoLeo View Post
    Chang,
    With all my respects, first picture I don't get it, no matter how much I try.
    I do "like" the second one, with the wide angle lens ( I''m fan of it), but god forgive me, I do not see where is the history. I do believet hat "history" might be in the "lower" part of the three, from focus point of view (F16-F22 like)

    hope it helps,
    Leo
    Thanks a lot for the feedback, it does help a lot!
    The first picture is the black wall in Auschwitz, but as Donald has said, it is missing context.
    I don't have a wide angle lens, so I stitched together three shots for the tree. What I meant with history is that the tree has probably been there for a long time, through the tragic history of the city, but same mistake, no context.
    What do you mean by history in the focus, I'm confused haha.


    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff F View Post
    With the first one, Chang, I wonder if cropping tighter on the right side and ending up with just three lamps and an image ratio of around 5 x 4 might have more impact.
    Great suggestion, thanks!



    Quote Originally Posted by Donald View Post
    With both these images, Chang, you have sought to tell a very moving story.

    For me the thing that is missing is context. If you had not told us that the first picture was the Death Wall in Auschwitz 1, people, apart from maybe those who have been there, could not have guessed that this was the location. Similarly, we cannot tell that the second image is taken in one of the cemeteries.

    So, the point I am making is - When we take a photograph, we are at the scene. We are experiencing the emotion that goes with location and the moment (I have been in the places that you have photographed and can testify to the overwhelming emotional experience). But the challenge facing us as photographers is then to convey that in a picture.

    The person viewing your picture will not have been there with you. They do not know what the mood and atmosphere is like. You have to try and capture that in a photograph. So, you have to provide the context; a visual story that the viewer can understand.

    I did not take any pictures when I visited Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II (Birkenau), but I think if I did of the Death Wall, then it needs to show the situation. For example, I think it would need most of the wall and the barrack blocks that line each side showing in the frame. The close-up shows us detail of what lies at the foot of the wall, but does not tell us of the horror of that place.
    Wow, I haven't even thought about that aspect. Thanks so much, your tips are worth gold!
    I will have another go at it (I'm a volunteer here) and keep your tip in mind.
    Again, thanks, it's very helpful.

    Cheers,
    Chang

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