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Thread: Looking to buy a new lens

  1. #1
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    Looking to buy a new lens

    I have a Nikon D7000 and I have a Nikkor 60mm f2.8 micro and a Nikkor AF 50mm f/1.8 lens and I also have a Tamron 70-300 1:4-5.6 lens. I would like to purchase a new lens I love to take photos of birds and I love macro photography (wish I would have spent the few extra $$ and bought the 105mm lens). My daughter plays hockey and soccer and I although it is a little out of my budget I am looking at the Nikkor 70-200 f.28 VRII lens. I am definately a beginner photographer and I am wondering if the Nikon AF 80-200 f2.8 would be sufficient. I am also wondering what is the difference in quality and ease of using between the Nikkor 70-200 and the Tamron 70-200 f2.8. Then there is also the Nikkor 70-200 f/2.8 VR and I was wondering about the difference between the VR and the VRII.

    Thanks in advance

    Debbie

  2. #2
    Moderator GrumpyDiver's Avatar
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    Re: Looking to buy a new lens

    I think you should always know why you are purchasing a particular lens, especially if you already have one that covers the focal range. Yes, a faster lens would be useful for sports photography, but are you willing to pay the pro price? You have a crop frame sensor on the 7000 and don't need the high end lens for it. Your 70-300 more than covers the range, but is going to be 1 or 2 stops slower. For your purpose (hand-held sports), I would not touch the 80-200 because it is not stabilized.

    If you are into birds; what about a longer lens. I have the Nikon 80 - 400 and my wife has the Sigma 150 -500mm. I personally would not buy the Nikon, as it is on the "to be updated" list by Nikon (I bought mine 3 years ago). The Sigma's image quality is similar to the Nikon's for less money; allthough the build quality on the Nikon is better.

    You might also want to consider a wide angle. You have nothing that isn't at least a short telephoto, so you will be limited in your landscape / cityscape work. If you want to go really cheap to try that, the kit 18 - 55mm is going to cost you about the same as your f/1.8 50mm (beware of the plastic lens mount though). If you have a bit more to spend, Nikon and Tokina have some nice wide angle and ultra-wide angle lenses (I have the Tokina f/2.8 11-16mm)

  3. #3
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: Looking to buy a new lens

    Surprised you don't have a kit lens (18-55mm).

  4. #4
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    Re: Looking to buy a new lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowman View Post
    Surprised you don't have a kit lens (18-55mm).
    I do, I have the Tamron 28-80 1:3.5-5.6, but I don't use it very often, espcially since I bought the 50mm last year.

  5. #5
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: Looking to buy a new lens

    Quote Originally Posted by debs26 View Post
    I do, I have the Tamron 28-80 1:3.5-5.6, but I don't use it very often, espcially since I bought the 50mm last year.
    For your macro needs it depends on what you want to photograph. The 60mm is good for product photography, 90-105mm flowers, insects, 180-200mm insects. You have other less costly options before making the move towards the 105mm, but keep it in your dream box, you can try the reverse lens technique (adapter less than $12.00) or you can try extension tubes (less than $12.00). Both options take some time getting used to but there are lots of resources available to get you through the discovery phase.

    Regarding the bird photography, I can't see why you can't get some good shots with the 70-300, you just need to lure the birds and give them an incentive to sit still while you fire away.

  6. #6
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    Re: Looking to buy a new lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowman View Post
    For your macro needs it depends on what you want to photograph. The 60mm is good for product photography, 90-105mm flowers, insects, 180-200mm insects. You have other less costly options before making the move towards the 105mm, but keep it in your dream box, you can try the reverse lens technique (adapter less than $12.00) or you can try extension tubes (less than $12.00). Both options take some time getting used to but there are lots of resources available to get you through the discovery phase.

    Regarding the bird photography, I can't see why you can't get some good shots with the 70-300, you just need to lure the birds and give them an incentive to sit still while you fire away.
    So what you are saying is that it is not a lens that I need to buy but some patience

  7. #7
    escaladieu's Avatar
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    Re: Looking to buy a new lens

    If you are into Macro I'd definitely consider extension tubes. They will enable you to use all your lenses for close-up and macro photography. I use the Kenko tubes with my 70-300 and get really good results, and they work well with the 50mm as well. I'm surprised you did not include the 70-300 in your list for birding ... esp on the D7000

  8. #8
    Shadowman's Avatar
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    Re: Looking to buy a new lens

    Quote Originally Posted by debs26 View Post
    So what you are saying is that it is not a lens that I need to buy but some patience
    Agreed, use what you have at the moment and you find it doesn't meet your every need then consider adding to your lens collection. I think you can do a lot with what you have and as Jeff said you can experiment with macro for a lower cost using extension tubes. The only other accessories you will need to go along with the extension tubes are a tripod, good lighting, and a good working surface. If your macro takes you outside then nature will be your platform.

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