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Thread: Setting up a new studio

  1. #1
    New Member
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    Mar 2012
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    Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria
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    Sunday Stephen

    Setting up a new studio

    I want to set up a new studio and I've got some money saved, I need some advice please!!!!
    eXplicit

  2. #2
    krispix's Avatar
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    Chris

    Re: Setting up a new studio

    Hi Stephen,
    You haven't told us what you want to do in your new studio. Portraiture, Macro, etc.
    If you let us know this I'm sure we can come up with some advice for you.

  3. #3
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    Sunday Stephen

    Re: Setting up a new studio

    I am so sorry about that. I want to do Potraiture in my studio. Thanks Chris!!!

  4. #4
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Richard

    Re: Setting up a new studio

    It is difficult to provide any advice until we learn the level of your expertise and a bit about your budget. Here are some questions that might possibly provide direction for members to provide recommendations...

    1. Will this be a home type studio or a professional studio?

    2. What is the space allocation for the studio?

    3. If it is a home studio, will it be a permanent setup or will you have to break it down after shooting?

    4. Do you have any studio equipment at this time (backgrounds, lights, etc.)?

    5. Finally, one big question: What is your estimated budget?

    One thing right off the bat! I hope that this doesn't insult you (I don't know your level of experence) but, I strongly suggest that your lighting setup be based on "real" studio strobes; not modified hotshoe flashes or continuous lighting. Quality studio strobes are just about a must (Despite Joe McNalley's great work with hotshoe flashes). However the quality required (read: price) of those strobes should be based on the type and amount of work you will do with them. Professional (5-days a week, 8-hours a day) work certainly demands higher quality equipment than the occasional weekend shooter needs.

    However, whatever the price you have allocated for equipment, I suggest you might be better off to stick with name brands rather than "no-name" Chinese imports. Name brand strobes tend to last longer and they tend to have replacement parts (flash tubes, modeling lights, etc.) available. I have some very old White Lightning studio strobes for which Paul C. Buff still supplies replacement parts.

    IMO, a photographer would be better off buying used name brand equipment than new "no-name" gear.

    Finally, a photographer occasionally can get equipped at a rock-bottom price by purchasing a set of used power-pack lights. Although I like the simplicity of monolights; powerpack sets can sometimes be found at very good prices. A warning however, the powerpack is quite heavy and if you purchase a power pack set from a seller who needs to ship it to you; shipping costs might eat up any savings you get from buying a used powerpack set over monolights.
    Last edited by rpcrowe; 16th March 2012 at 03:25 PM.

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